Professors hope to make comic books more relevant on campus

first_imgTCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt Linkedin Olivia Moodyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/olivia-moody/ printSwapping out traditional textbooks in the classroom and bringing in comic books is getting some students enthusiastic about learning.Wesley Cray, an assistant professor of philosophy, began using comic books in his classroom due to his teaching style, which focuses on philosophical questions pertaining to various forms of art.“Comics, it turns out, is among my favorite art forms, so it was only a matter of time before they showed up in my classroom,” Cray said.Not only are students as enthusiastic about this form of literature — they can get a different type of literacy through this interplay of text and images that they wouldn’t through standard written books, said Cray.Junior Ali Scholtz uses comic books in her Entrepreneurial Opportunity Recognition class. She said that comic book reading was new for her. After some adjusting, she became much more interested than she would have with a traditional textbook.“It wasn’t something I found myself dreading to read before every class,” Scholtz said. “Instead, I enjoyed seeing what was going to come next.”Comic book, “Mission In A Bottle”, was assigned to student Ali Scholtz by her professor.Cray, alongside an informal group of professors, created the TCU Comics Initiative, a group consisting of TCU faculty who share research and teaching interests involving comics.“One of our goals is to help promote comics scholarship and comics-related activities on campus,” Cray said. “There are a growing number of comics-related courses on campus, so our hope is to use the Comics Initiative to help raise awareness about these courses and get students interested.”The TCU Comics Initiative had their first group activity by bringing 2009 alumni Molly Mahan back to campus to talk about how her liberal arts education at TCU helped her with her career as an editor with DC Comics.Cray said in the future, the TCU Comics Initiative hopes to be formally recognized by the university and potentially develop a Center for Comics Studies in the future. Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Miller’s floater at the buzzer gives Horned Frogs win over Cowboys Twitter Olivia Moodyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/olivia-moody/ Women’s Track and Field adds plethora of new talent to roster Chicken wings are the Super Bowl champs Born and raised in Denver, Colorado, Olivia was ready to head out of state to follow her passion for journalism. After making the dance team at TCU, this school became the perfect place for her to follow her passion for journalism and her love for dance. Journalism has carried over into her personal life with her recent blog “Liv Greatly.” Using her minor in criminal justice, Olivia’s end goal is to become an investigative reporter. Twittercenter_img Olivia Moodyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/olivia-moody/ Women of Empowerment Organization provides ‘inclusion and support’ ReddIt Facebook Linkedin + posts Facebook Olivia Moody Olivia Moodyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/olivia-moody/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Previous articleWomen’s Basketball outlasts Ole Miss in SEC/Big 12 challenge, 55-50Next articleBane explodes for season-high 24 points, TCU defeats Central Michigan Olivia Moody RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Researchers Find 1 In 5 LA County Renters Pay Late Or Miss Payment

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Roughly one in five tenants in Los Angeles County have paid their rent late or skipped at least one payment during the pandemic, putting them at risk of losing their homes when the state’s eviction moratorium expires, according to a joint UCLA-USC study released Monday.“Twenty-two percent of Los Angeles County tenants paid rent late at least once from April to July, while between May and July, about 7% did not pay any rent at least once,” according to researchers at the UCLA Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.Among households in the county that did not pay rent, either in full or partially, about 98,000 tenants have been threatened with an eviction, while an additional 40,000 report that their landlord has begun eviction proceedings, according to the report detailing hardships faced by tenants during the COVID- 19 pandemic, including lost wages as a result of the economic shutdown.“I think everyone understood, early on, that renters might be in trouble as a result of COVID-19 and its economic fallout,” said lead author Michael Manville, an associate professor of urban planning at UCLA.Highlights of the study’s findings include:• about 16% of tenants report paying rent late each month from April through July;• about 10% did not pay rent in full for at least one month between May and July; and• about 2% of renters are three full months behind on rent, representing almost 40,000 households.“Nonpayment occurs disproportionately among the lowest-income renter households, so repaying back rent could be a tremendous burden for them,” noted the report’s co-author Michael Lens of UCLA.And although the majority of tenants are paying their rent despite the pandemic, researchers said it’s important to note that many are relying on unconventional and potentially unsustainable funding sources. One-third of households with problems paying rent relied on credit card debt and about 40% used emergency payday loans, according to the report.Renters who struggle to pay their bills are suffering disproportionately from anxiety, depression and food scarcity, and they are relying more on credit cards, family and friends, and payday loans to cover their expenses, researchers found.The prevalence of job losses and nonconventional forms of payment suggest the importance of direct income assistance to renter households, researchers said, noting that tenants collecting unemployment insurance were 39% less likely to miss rent payments.“One of the main concerns among landlords at the beginning of the pandemic was that tenants weren’t going to pay their rent if they knew they weren’t going to be evicted,” said Richard Green, director of the USC Lusk Center. “Not only have we not seen any evidence of this, but getting money in renters’ hands through unemployment insurance or rental assistance helps a lot.”California’s moratorium on evictions is scheduled to end Sept. 1, but lawmakers are considering a bill that would extend certain protections through Jan. 31, 2021.Paavo Monkkonen, an associate professor of urban planning and public policy for UCLA, said the research shows that helping renters now “will not only stave off looming evictions next month but also prevent cumulative money problems that are no less serious, such as renters struggling to pay back credit card debt, struggling to manage a repayment plan or emerging from the pandemic with little savings left.”To read the full report, go to www.lewis.ucla.edu/research/covid19-and- renter-distress/. Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 17 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Subscribe Community Newscenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Researchers Find 1 In 5 LA County Renters Pay Late Or Miss Payment CITY NEWS SERVICE Published on Monday, August 31, 2020 | 2:04 pm STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Yoga Poses To Overcome Stress And AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

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Limerick flood defence ‘Toblerone’ topping is not to everyone’s taste

first_imgNewsLocal NewsLimerick flood defence ‘Toblerone’ topping is not to everyone’s tasteBy Bernie English – July 16, 2017 996 Covid crisis impacts building of new homes in Limerick Linkedin Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 654 new homes built in Limerick over past year Lack of security put Opera centre at risk Fatality in Abbeyfeale WhatsApp Printcenter_img Facebook Advertisement An Bord Pleanála grants permission for King’s Island Flood Relief Scheme picture: Brendan GleesonSOME have compared it to a Toblerone chocolate bar but it’s definitely not to everyone’s taste – that’s the verdict of residents of Verdent Crescent in King’s Island on the new flood defence wall recently erected by Limerick City and County Council.Limerick flood defence. picture: Brendan GleesonHigh tides caused havoc in the area in recent years with home owners and elected representatives clamouring for the council to take measures to save their homes from further damage.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The council acceded to their wishes and erected a wall between Verdent Crescent and the river – but locals say that while it might solve the flooding problem, it’s left them staring at an ugly structure.“It looks dreadful. There must have been a better way to finish it,” said local resident Rita Samphier.82 year-old Rita, who has been living in the Crescent since it was built, said that “no-one who has to look out at this wall is happy. We can’t see the lovely flowing water or the ducks and swans anymore. Instead we have this ugly thing that’s topped with soemthing that looks like a pyramid. We have to look at this for the rest of our lives,” she told the Limerick Post.Local councillor, John Gilligan (Ind) says he’s fully in agreement with Rita.“The flood defence are completely necessary but I think they might have come up with something more attractive, This looks like an ugly Toblerone,” he said.Cllr Gilligan approached the council engineers after hearing complaints from the residents.“The told me that because it is a double wall, the capping is a necessary part of the structure”.“We were delighted that they fronted the wall with stone but the capping is not at all aesthetically pleasing. The problem is that it can’t be rounded for health and safety reasons – the engineers have to use something that people can’t walk on top of,” he explained.However he believes that something can still be done to make the structure visually more acceptable.“I’m asking them to look at painting it to make it look better but first and foremost, the wall is intended to keep the area flood free,” he said. Previous articleBusy night for Limerick Fire ServiceNext articleCardinal says Church must stand on the side of victims Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. 900 homes with go-ahead still on drawing board Twitter TAGSConstructionflood defenceKing’s Islandresidential last_img read more

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Cowan to make Dail statement on drink driving disqualification

first_imgAgriculture Minister Barry Cowen is expected to make a Dáil statement on his drink-driving disqualification.The Minister will request Dáil time to make a statement on the matter.However, the mechanism does not allow opposition TDs to put questions to the Minister on the issue.Minister Cowen was put off the road for three months in 2016 for drink driving while on a learner’s permit – something he didn’t tell party leader Micheál Martin about. WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Cowan to make Dail statement on drink driving disqualification By News Highland – July 6, 2020 Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Previous articleCalifornian benefactor gives huge boost to Termon GAANext articleEvening News, Sport, and Obituaries on Monday July 6th News Highland Google+ WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Homepage BannerNews Facebook Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 last_img read more

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Coronavirus updates: US passes 250,000 deaths, nearly 1 in 5 worldwide

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, EMILY SHAPIRO, ERIN SCHUMAKER, IVAN PEREIRA and JON HAWORTH, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 1.3 million people worldwide.Over 55.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has also varied from country to country.The United States is the worst-affected nation, with more than 11.3 million diagnosed cases and at least 249,430 deaths.Nearly 200 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least 10 of which are in crucial phase three studies. Of those 10 potential vaccines in late-stage trials, there are currently five that will be available in the United States if approved.Here’s how the news developed Wednesday. All times Eastern:Nov 18, 10:04 pmNew cases up nearly 40% from last week, according to HHS memoNew COVID-19 cases in the U.S. increased nearly 40% in week-over-week comparisons, according to an internal Health and Human Services memo obtained by ABC News.The number of new cases confirmed from Nov. 11 to 17 (over 1.1 million) was a 38.9% increase from the previous seven-day period, the memo said. The national test-positivity rate increased to 11% from 9.3% during that time.Deaths also increased 8.4% in week-to-week comparisons, the memo said.Across the country, 27% of hospitals have more than 80% of their intensive care unit beds filled. That number was 17% to 18% during the summertime peak.Arkansas and Indiana have recently reported record hospitalizations, HHS said, while Kentucky, New Mexico, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee and Oklahoma have also seen notable increases. In Minnesota, the areas bordering Wisconsin are reporting over 85% usage of critical care beds at hospitals, according to the memo.Nov 18, 9:15 pmUS records highest daily death count since MayThe U.S. saw 1,869 deaths reported on Wednesday, the highest daily death count since May 7, according to The COVID Tracking Project.The country saw nearly 164,000 new cases and more than 79,000 Americans are hospitalized with the virus, a record number according to the health data.A dozen states, including New York, Florida, California and Indiana, recorded more than 5,000 new cases, according to the data.Twenty-six states currently have over 1,000 patients in the hospital for COVID-19-related issues, according to The COVID Tracking Project.Nov 18, 8:40 pmMinnesota to enact new restrictionsMinnesota Gov. Tim Walz announced a new set of coronavirus restrictions for nonessential businesses will go into effect this weekend.Starting at midnight on Saturday, all restaurants are closed to in-person dining and gyms and other indoor entertainment will be closed. In-person social gatherings outside of the household are prohibited, as are weddings, private parties and other social occasions.Hair salons, barbershops and retail stores are exempt from the new restrictions. Places of worship, schools, dental offices and elective surgeries, which are already operating in a limited fashion, will also not be further limited by the new restrictions.“Today marks a somber milestone in the pandemic as we surpass 3,000 Minnesotans lost to COVID-19,” Walz said.The governor added that hospitals are at the “breaking point” and nearing a situation where they will have to turn away new patients.The restrictions will remain in effect for at least four weeks.Nov 18, 6:38 pmKansas issues statewide mask mandateKansas became the latest state to issue a mask mandate, as COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths spike.Gov. Laura Kelly announced the executive order Wednesday, which would require Kansans to wear face coverings inside public spaces or in situations where physical distancing of 6 feet cannot be maintained.Children younger than 5 and people with medical conditions are exempt.The order begins Nov. 25 and will be in effect indefinitely.The mandate follows a similar order issued in Iowa on Monday, as the Midwest experiences a surge of COVID-19 cases.ABC News’ Darren Reynolds contributed to this report.Nov 18, 6:38 pmUS hits 250,000 COVID-19 deathsThe U.S. marked a grim milestone in the pandemic, with the COVID-19 death toll passing 250,000, according to Johns Hopkins University.There have been 250,029 confirmed deaths due to the virus, based on the university’s tracker. The tally crossed a quarter million shortly before 6 p.m. ET.Globally, over 1.3 million people have died from COVID-19.The U.S. has had the most deaths out of any country, according to the JHU tracker, accounting for 18.6% of the global total, followed by Brazil at 166,699 (12.4%), India at 130,993 (9.7%) and Mexico at 99,026 (7.4%).Nov 18, 3:50 pmFlorida mayors beg governor to enact statewide mask mandateThe mayors of five Florida cities — Miami Beach, St. Petersburg, Sunrise, Miami Shores and Hialeah — are begging Gov. Ron DeSantis to enact a statewide mask mandate. At a Wednesday news conference, they also asked DeSantis to allow local governments to make decisions for their communities in regards to social distancing, contact tracing and testing. “Since the governor opened up the economy totally in late September and simultaneously prevented local governments from enforcing individual mask mandates, we have seen an enormous surge,” Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber said. “Our state’s primary economic engine is hospitality, and people will not travel here if they believe it’s unsafe. In fact, I’m convinced in projecting our state as a place where people are not wearing masks and where the virus is allowed to spread unconstrained will only serve to discourage visitors.”“We are asking the governor to lead,” Gelber said.“For whatever reason our governor has decided that he is going to follow the lead of our president and not listen to what the medical experts and what the health care experts are saying,” added St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman. “We have got to have a state that follows the same rules and puts in place the same rules as some of the other states around the country.”ABC News’ Rachel Katz contributed to this report.Nov 18, 3:06 pm19 states hit record number of hospitalizationsAccording to the COVID Tracking Project, 19 states hit a record number of current hospitalizations Tuesday: Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.Six states — Idaho, Maine, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Washington and Wyoming — reached a record number of new cases Tuesday. Four states — Iowa, Kentucky, New Mexico and Wisconsin — recorded a record number of deaths.Daily cases have climbed each day over the last week in the U.S., reaching 154,266 on Tuesday, according to the COVID Tracking Project.ABC News’ Brian Hartman, Ben Bell, Soorin Kim and Arielle Mitropoulos contributed to this report.Nov 18, 2:55 pmNYC schools closing ThursdayNew York City public schools will close for in-person learning Thursday because the city has reached its 3% positivity rate threshold, said Chancellor Richard Carranza.All 300,000 students will learn remotely until further notice, he said.“This is a temporary closure, and school buildings will reopen as soon as it is safe to do so,” Carranza said.According to state data, New York City’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate is 2.5%.As of Monday, the schools had a positivity rate of 0.23% out of more than 140,000 students and staff tested.ABC News’ Aaron Katersky contributed to this report.Nov 18, 2:15 pmUS facing ‘worst rate of rise in cases’White House coronavirus task force member Adm. Brett Giroir said the U.S. is facing “the worst rate of rise in cases that we’ve seen.”“This is not crying wolf,” he stressed in an interview on MSNBC.Though “vaccines are around the corner,” Giroir said, state and local officials must be “very rigorous” about limiting certain businesses, limiting crowds in indoor spaces and enforcing mask use.“If we do not do that, we will lose tens of thousands of Americans by the time the vaccine is out and widely distributed,” he said.Giroir also urged Americans to remember that a negative test is not a “free pass” to forgo masks and social distancing over the holidays.“That negative test today does not mean you’re going to be negative tomorrow or the next day, and certainly not by Thanksgiving. And it is not a free pass to go without all the important measures that we want, particularly mask wearing, physical distancing and following all the recommendations that the CDC has for the holidays,” Giroir said.ABC News’ Brian Hartman contributed to this report.Nov 18, 12:28 pmNew surge hits South KoreaSouth Korea is on edge after a surge in new COVID-19 cases this week.Since the outbreak in late February, South Korea has mostly maintained low COVID-19 number.But this week this country is seeing a steady increase and hit the highest in 81 days at 313 newly confirmed cases.South Korea now has 29,311 cases and 496 deaths.ABC News’ Joohee Cho Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Nov 18, 11:31 amDelta Air Lines extending middle-seat block through MarchDelta Air Lines will continue to block middle seats through March 2021 “because customers tell us that adds confidence to their travel experience,” CEO Ed Bastian told “GMA 3: What You Need to Know.”Bastian stressed that Delta hasn’t “pulled back at all with our safety and cleaning protocols.”“Every airplane gets sanitized with electric spray fogging before we take off. We continue to focus on the filtration systems ,and they’re state-of-the-art, and customers are required to wear masks,” he said. “We don’t have a single documented transmission of COVID aboard any of our planes.”“While travel is slow, it’s steadily improving,” Bastian said. “We’re expecting over the Thanksgiving holiday period, starting on Friday for the next 10 days, about 2 million customers.”ABC News’ Andrea Amiel and Lataya Rothmiller contributed to this report.Nov 18, 10:17 amNurse on the picket line speaks out: ‘We’re putting our foot down’Jim Gentile is one of hundreds of registered nurses who have gone on strike at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, Pennsylvania, some 25 miles northeast of Philadelphia. The nurses and their union say the main issue is inadequate staffing due to low wages, which they fear will only worsen as COVID-19 hospitalizations increase over the winter months.“We’re putting our foot down now because we know it’s going to get twice as bad,” Gentile told “Start Here,” ABC News’ daily news podcast.Gentile, who works in the surgical services unit, said the hospital suspended all elective and non-emergency surgeries when the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic hit earlier this year. He and his coworkers were then sent to other floors to take care of COVID-19 patients.“I did postmortem care on more bodies in two months than I have in 42 years of nursing. That’s how bad it was,” he said. “That’s not my job. Usually, we wake people up from surgery and everybody’s happy and we send them home. So this was really quite a shift.”The hospital resumed all surgeries over the summer and Gentile was able to return to his unit. But as COVID-19 hospitalizations tick back up, Gentile worries he and his coworkers will again be taken out of their area of expertise and sent to the coronavirus wards.“In two weeks, we’ve doubled the number of COVID patients in our hospital,” he said. “There are not enough nurses to take care of the patients.”The nurses on the picket line are fighting for a fair contract and better wages.Gentile said the hospital desperately needs to hire more nurses to help care for the influx of COVID-19 patients, but the wages are too low and can’t compete with other area hospitals. In the last two years, 243 nurses have left St. Mary’s Medical Center, according to Gentile.“When they showed us the wages, we realized no nurses are going to come to our institution with wages this low,” he said. “We’re not going to be able to recruit, we’re not going to be able to retain.”Gentile, who has watched coworkers and friends die from COVID-19, said it’s a matter of life and death.“They don’t understand the PTSD that nurses are going through and all they care about is keeping, you know, the budget, the bottom line, the margin,” he said. “It doesn’t matter how much money you’ve lost. We’ve lost family, we’ve lost friends. We put our lives at stake.”When asked for comment, a St. Mary Medical Center spokesperson told ABC News the hospital has offered a wage increase, which the nurses rejected, and that outside nurses have been hired to fill in during the strike.“We respect the union members’ right to strike, and we remain committed to negotiating in good faith to reach agreement on a fair, consistent and sustainable initial contract for St. Mary nurses,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “We look forward to the day productive negotiations can resume.”Nov 18, 8:38 amEurope sees decline in cases for first time in months, but deaths continue to rise: WHOThe European region saw a 10% decline in the number of new COVID-19 cases over the past week for the first time in more than three months, according to the latest weekly epidemiological report from the World Health Organization.The report, dated Tuesday, said the decline is attributed to “the strengthening of public health and social measures across the region.”However, the number of new deaths from the disease “has increased substantially” in Europe, with an 18% jump over the past week in comparison to the previous one.The European region recorded 46% of all cases and 49% of all deaths reported globally over the past week, with nearly two million new cases and almost 30,000 new deaths. The countries reporting the highest number of cases during that time were Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Poland, Russia, Germany, Spain, Ukraine, Romania and Austria, according to the report.The nations with the highest weekly mortality rates — exceeding 60 deaths per 1 million population — were the Czech Republic, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Belgium, North Macedonia, Armenia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Poland, France, Croatia and Montenegro. The United Kingdom was the first country in the region to record over 50,000 cumulative deaths, the report said.Nov 18, 6:57 amPfizer vaccine 95% effective in final analysis, plans to seek emergency authorization ‘within days’Pfizer and partner BioNTech announced Wednesday that their COVID-19 vaccine candidate is more than 95% effective in the final analysis of its massive Phase 3 trial and has reached a key safety milestone that will allow the company to apply for authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration “within days.”If the FDA gives the vaccine the green light, Pfizer will likely make history as the first company with an FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccine. It has plans to start delivering millions of doses of the potentially lifesaving vaccine to the most vulnerable overnight once the government gives a green light, possibly before the end of 2020, the company said.Just last week, Pfizer and BioNTech announced their vaccine was more than 90% effective, according to a preliminary analysis based on the first 94 patients to develop symptomatic COVID-19 in a trial of more than 43,000 volunteers.But with the pandemic raging in the United States and across the globe, it didn’t take long for even more volunteers to become infected, quickly bringing Pfizer’s trial to 170 COVID-positive cases — exceeding the threshold needed for a “final” analysis on the vaccine’s effectiveness.In a press release, delivered before the stock market opened, Pfizer announced that among the 170 volunteers to develop COVID-19 in the clinical trial, 162 had been given placebo shots, while only eight volunteers to become infected were given the real vaccine.This means Pfizer’s vaccine is roughly 95% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19. The updated efficacy data follows news from competitor Moderna, which announced earlier this week that its vaccine was 94.5% effective in its own preliminary analysis.It’s not known yet what level of immunity or how long the immunity lasts after receiving the vaccines. Trial volunteers will be followed for two years to answer questions like durability of protection.Pfizer also announced another major milestone Wednesday — enough safety data to merit FDA authorization. The FDA requires at least two months of safety data among at least half of the trial volunteers before it will consider granting a limited emergency authorization. Pfizer has now hit key milestones that will allow the company to apply for this limited authorization, which could happen in the coming days.Nov 18, 6:02 amTokyo reports highest daily increase in casesTokyo confirmed 493 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, the highest single-day tally for Japan’s capital since the pandemic began.According to local media reports, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government is preparing to raise the COVID-19 alert level to the highest of four ranks and is also considering asking bars and restaurants to shorten their hours again as part of efforts to curb the rising infection rate.Meanwhile, Japan confirmed more than 2,000 new cases on Wednesday for the first time since the start of the pandemic. Overall, the East Asian country has reported more than 120,000 cases including just under 2,000 deaths, according to the latest figures from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare.The recent surge in infections comes amid the Japanese government’s controversial “Go to Travel” campaign, which encourages domestic travel to help boost the economy by providing residents with subsidies of up to 50% on hotels, restaurants and transportation within Japan.Nov 18, 5:24 amRussia sees record-high deaths for second straight dayRussia registered 456 deaths from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, setting a new single-day record for the second straight day.An additional 20,985 new cases of COVID-19 were also confirmed nationwide over the past day. Russia’s cumulative total now stands at 1,991,998 cases with 34,387 deaths, according to the country’s coronavirus response headquarters.Moscow remains the epicenter of the country’s outbreak and recent surge. Nearly 20% of the newly confirmed cases — 4,174 — and more than 16% of the new deaths — 76 — were reported in the capital, according to Russia’s coronavirus response headquarters.Despite the growing number of infections and deaths, Russian authorities have repeatedly said they have no plans to impose another nationwide lockdown.The Eastern European country of 145 million people has the fifth-highest tally of COVID-19 cases in the world, behind only the United States, India, Brazil and France, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Nov 18, 5:06 amFrance becomes first country in Europe to reach two million casesFrance’s tally of COVID-19 cases has hit the two million mark, becoming the first country in Europe to do so and the fourth in the world.French Director General of Health Jerome Salomon announced Tuesday evening that the country had reached the grim milestone of 2,036,755 confirmed cases, along with an “unprecedented number of hospitalizations” of over 33,000.“Whether in cities or in rural areas, all regions, all metropolitan departments are affected,” Salomon said. “This second wave, which we are all facing, is massive, deadly and is straining all of our caregivers and our health system as a whole.”French Health Minister Olivier Veran said on Tuesday that while the country was regaining control over COVID-19, it’s still too soon to lift the second nationwide lockdown, which was imposed on Oct. 30 to contain the spread of the virus.The French government has set a Dec. 1 deadline for ending the lockdown but said it could extend it if case numbers don’t decline fast enough.Nov 18, 4:27 amUS reports over 150K new cases for fifth straight dayThere were 161,934 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the United States on Tuesday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the fifth day in a row that the country has reported over 150,000 newly diagnosed infections. Tuesday’s count is slightly less than the all-time high of 177,224 on Nov. 13.An additional 1,707 fatalities from COVID-19 were also registered nationwide on Tuesday, the highest since mid-May but still under a peak of 2,609 new deaths on April 15.A total of 11,359,804 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 248,687 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. 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Leading payments platform says it is “hard to believe” rent isn’t recorded by credit agencies

first_imgRental payments platform PayProp has called for rental histories to be added to tenants’ credit scores which is says will help re-ignite the first-time buyer property market.The company, which started in South Africa but now has a substantial presence in the UK and elsewhere, says enabling tenants to use their regular rent payments to improve their credit scores would help more first time buyers get on to the property ladder, and also incentivise tenants not to pay their rent late.“Many tenants have been paying rent on time for years, if not decades. The fact that this does not carry the same weight as a mortgage payment is hard to believe,” says Neil Cobbold, CEO of PayProp in the UK (pictured, below).“Thanks to the rapid growth of the private rental sector, more tenants are paying higher rents. Taking cognisance of rent payments would therefore make perfect sense, encouraging the next generation of property buyers.“Recording and counting rent payments towards credit scores is a modern phenomenon and therefore it needs a modern solution,”Credit reference agencies and lenders in the UK are not required to take rental payment into account when ‘scoring’ borrowers, and only Experian does so voluntarily, but only for tenants who rent via large-scale landlords and housing associations.Individual tenants can ask to have their rental payments paid through Experian via stand-alone service CreditLadder.LegislationAlso, last year saw significant support from the government and campaigners for rental payments to be added to credit scores. This included a parliamentary debate following a 140,000-strong e-petition, the launch and second reading of Lord Bird’s Creditworthiness Assessment Bill in the Lords, and a £2 million initiative funded by the government to find the best tech platform to record rental payments by tenants.“It’s great to see other businesses support the Creditworthiness Assessment Bill,” says Sheraz Dar, CEO of  CreditLadder (pictured, right) which currently works with 650 letting agents across the UK.“We have always believed a tenant’s rent payment should count towards their credit score and this is something we’ve been supporting for over a year with Experian.“In two weeks time we are fundamentally changing how a tenant’s rent payment will be verified as we embrace changes in technology and legislation, this will also allow us to enhance and support tenant referencing.” PayProp rental payments credit histories credit scores creditladder January 5, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Leading payments platform says it is “hard to believe” rent isn’t recorded by credit agencies previous nextProptechLeading payments platform says it is “hard to believe” rent isn’t recorded by credit agenciesPayProp joins rising chorus of calls for tenants’ rental payments to be added to credit histories and given as much weight as mortgage payments.Nigel lewis5th January 201801,780 Viewslast_img read more

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Teenagers from France allegedly break into numerous cars in Secaucus

first_imgSECAUCUS – Secaucus police have charged ten teenagers from France in a series of car burglaries allegedly taking place in town earlier this month, according to a press release.On July 21, the Secaucus Police Department received calls of vehicle burglaries in the area around Second Street.Twelve vehicles were reported to have been burglarized after 4 a.m. that morning. Both patrol and detective division personnel worked together to process the vehicles for evidence and canvass the area. They soon located surveillance footage from nearby locations showing what appeared to be juveniles committing the burglaries.Shortly after 3 a.m the following day, Officer Michael Bronowich was patrolling the area when he came across a large group of juveniles walking between cars with flashlights. Bronowich observed that many of the juveniles fit the profile from the surveillance footage. The juveniles, ranging from ages 13 to 17, were taken into custody.The youth are French nationals visiting the U.S. on a summer camp retreat, according to the release. They were staying at the town’s Red Roof Inn with adult guardians. They went out for walks collectively when they allegedly committed the burglaries. Further investigation by police managed to procure some of the stolen itemsAll ten juveniles are charged with twelve counts of burglary and twelve counts of conspiracy to commit burglary. Three of the juveniles are additionally charged with three counts of theft; one juvenile is additionally charged with receiving stolen property. Though ordered released to their guardians, the teens’ passports have been seized. They were set to make their first court appearance July 24.Noting that all the burglarized vehicles were unlocked, Chief Kevin Flaherty urged all residents to “be sure to lock their vehicles to reduce the ability to commit this ‘crime of opportunity.’” ×last_img read more

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Community celebrates mass to remember loss of first-year students

first_imgGrace Doerfler | The Observer University President Fr. John Jenkins said mass Tuesday night in the stadium to remember first-year students Valeria Espinel and Olivia Laura Rojas.Espinel, originally from Guayaquil, Ecuador, lived in Badin Hall and planned to study economics. Rojas, from Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, lived in Cavanaugh Hall. She intended to study in the Mendoza College of Business.The community also held in prayer sophomore Eduardo Jose Elias Calderon, who was injured in the crash and remains hospitalized.Family members and friends of Espinel and Rojas traveled to Notre Dame and attended the mass. Others attended from Bolivia, Ecuador and the Dominican Republic through a live stream of the service.Vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding welcomed the community to the memorial service.“We are grateful for your presence as we gather to pray for the eternal rest of two members of the class of 2024,” she said. “We believe that God is holding them gently and in immeasurable love.”University President Fr. John Jenkins presided at the mass, first thanking the families of the two students for traveling to campus. The mass began somberly as Jenkins reflected on the tragedy that occurred Saturday morning.“Olivia and Valeria were with us for too short a time,” he said. “But I’ve heard from their friends, their teachers and their families that they embraced Notre Dame and made it their home. We now gather to remember and pray for these two friends, students, classmates and family members who have been taken from us so suddenly, so soon.”Director of Campus Ministry Fr. Pete McCormick delivered the homily at the service. He acknowledged the tragedy that had shaken the community, noting “the hardship that comes from losing two members of our Notre Dame family to an untimely death.”McCormick’s homily focused on honoring how Espinel and Rojas deeply valued friendship and family. He read from papers each student had written earlier in the semester about how to live a good life and celebrated the friendship between the two young women.“To think that this relationship was somehow simply limited between Valeria and Olivia would be a big mistake,” McCormick said. “Together they built upon each other’s strengths to create a network of great friends and meaningful relationships.”McCormick said sorrow is appropriate in response to these students’ deaths, but he invited the congregation to trust in God’s mercy.“We commend these two sisters of ours to a God who makes all things new — grateful for their lives, thankful for the ways that God has worked through them to give us a clear sense of heaven itself,” he said. “We now commend our sisters to eternal rest.”The mass included a mix of Spanish and English, including music in Spanish provided by Coro Primavera, the University’s Spanish-language choir. The rectors of Cavanaugh Hall and Badin Hall, Jo Cecilio and Sr. Susan Sisko, respectively, offered bilingual prayers of the faithful. Grace Doerfler | The Observer To remember the light of Espinel and Rojas, those gathered in the congregation turned on their flashlights on their phones.At the mass’ conclusion, McCormick asked all those gathered to turn on their phone flashlights “as a way of reflecting back the light that Valeria and Olivia have shown to us.” As lights illuminated the stadium, McCormick addressed the two students’ families.“Family members, we have been blessed to walk among the lights of your two daughters,” he said. “Know that while this day may pass and memories of this particular moment may fade, know that your daughters will walk with us and our community forever.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Mass of Remembrance, Notre Dame Stadium, University President Fr. John Jenkins Thousands of members of the Notre Dame community gathered Tuesday night to remember first-year students Valeria Espinel and Olivia Laura Rojas in a mass held in Notre Dame Stadium. Both students passed away early Saturday morning after being hit by a car.last_img read more

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Borlaug Fellows

first_imgFor many Indian families, “pulse” crops – lentils and other legumes that are eaten as porridges – are essential. Not only are they an important source of protein, but these pulse crops can also grow on poor soil and produce lentils and legumes even with limited and erratic rainfall.Despite their resiliency, production levels of these important crops have declined over the past 70 years, according to Sushil Yadav, a Borlaug Fellow who spent four months at the University of Georgia Center for Applied Genetic Technologies working with Zenglu Li, learning “metabolic fingerprinting” skills that he’ll take back to India.“Eighty percent of the farms in the Hyderabad area of India are small and marginal,” said Yadav, who is a scientist at the Central Research Institute for Dryland Research there. “If we can identify the key genetic regulators for enhancing drought-stress tolerance in these crops, we can stabilize their productivity and increase their availability to a very large vegetarian population in India.”Yadav is one of three international researchers who studied with UGA faculty this spring as part of the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. The program, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service, promotes food security and economic growth by providing training and collaborative research opportunities to researchers and policymakers from developing or middle-income countries who are in the early or middle stages of their careers, according to the USDA’s website. At UGA, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs manages the program.Also studying at UGA through the Borlaug Fellowship Program are Direba Demisse of Ethiopia and Reham Fathey Aly of Egypt.“Ethiopia has more than 50 million head of cattle, but milk production is very low. In fact, we have to import milk from other countries,” said Demisse, national project coordinator for smallholder dairy cattle genetic improvement research at the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research in Holeta. “If we can use modern molecular technologies to increase the number of improved animals while conserving indigenous genetic resources and develop a clear breeding strategy, we can improve our country’s food security.”During his stay, Demisse worked with Ignacy Misztal in the college’s Department of Animal and Dairy Science.Aly, who will remain at UGA until late July, said she has learned a great deal about integrated pest management (IPM), which she plans to introduce to her colleagues in the agricultural zoology and nematology department at the Cairo University in Giza, Egypt.“I’ve learned so much about the principles of bioassay and how applicable the work I’m doing here will be in Egypt,” said Aly, who is working with Ashfaq Sial in the UGA entomology department. “Not only will the work I’m learning be useful in the management and mitigation of the peach fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly, but I hope to write a project that uses IPM for the control of snails, which have become a major pest in Egypt.”Sial, whose research includes developing new integrated pest management techniques to control spotted wing drosophila in blueberries, said he looks forward to traveling to Egypt later this year to continue his work with Aly.“One of the many benefits of the Borlaug Fellowship is the opportunity for mentors to travel to the fellow’s country,” he said. “At this point, Egypt has very little understanding of IPM techniques and relies more on chemical options to control pests. I think there are a lot of opportunities to establish partnerships with researchers there that could particularly benefit fruit and vegetable growers in both Georgia and parts of Egypt.”Borlaug fellows are selected annually based on research proposals submitted to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. Once the fellows have been selected, U.S. universities bid to host them, identifying research mentors and arranging logistics. Costs are covered by the Borlaug Fellowship Program.“We have been hosting Borlaug Fellows in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences since 2006 and have had researchers from Armenia, Rwanda, Malawi, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Kosovo, Iraq, Pakistan, the Philippines and Poland,” according to Victoria McMaken, associate director of the Office of Global Programs.“There are a number of benefits for both the individual fellows and mentors, but because all of these projects are related to food security, the University of Georgia, the state of Georgia and the United States all benefit from creating long-standing connections with university and research institutions throughout the world,” McMaken said.last_img read more

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Spanish pension funds post average 3.2% gain despite bond losses

first_imgMeanwhile, figures from Mercer’s Pension Investment Performance Service (PIPS) showed that, for the 2017 calendar year, equity allocations within Spanish pension funds returned 7.8%. Within this, euro-zone equities returned 8.4%, European equities outside the euro-zone gained 4.9%, and North American equities increased by 4.4%.Among the biggest allocations within fixed income, euro-zone government bonds made 0.2%, while euro-zone credit made 1.4%. However, government bonds, high yield and credit allocations outside of Europe contributed to an overall loss in fixed income of 0.5%.Xavier Bellavista, principal at Mercer, said these losses were due to performance and currency depreciation in non-euro-zone assets.Within alternatives, private equity made 13.3%, hedge funds 2.3% and real estate 1.3%.The PIPS survey covered a large sample of pension funds, most of them occupational schemes. It reported that Spanish funds on averaged allocated 59.9% to fixed income and 35.4% to equities.Fixed income allocations were dominated by euro-zone credit (18.8%), followed by euro-zone government bonds (18%) and 9.7% in cash. Euro-zone equities made up 17.7%, North American equities 10% and emerging markets 3.6%.According to the PIPS figures, only 4.6% of pension fund assets were held in alternatives, principally 1.7% in real estate and 1.4% in hedge funds.There has been a gradual shift away from euro-zone holdings over the long term, according to Mercer.Bellavista said: “The main difference between December 2017 and December 2016 is the increase in exposure to non-euro-zone assets… especially in fixed income. The equity exposure is the highest in the last seven years, while alternatives continue to increase slowly.”In terms of risk management, Bellavista observed that in general, during 2017 and the start of 2018, pension funds had quite a positive sentiment when looking at macroeconomic data.However, he added: “Most pension fund managers maintain a prudent approach because of high valuations and low interest rates. This is making some of them implement hedging strategies to protect against tail risk.” Spanish occupational pension funds gained 3.2% on average in 2017, according to the country’s Investment and Pension Fund Association (INVERCO).This marked an improvement on the 2.7% gain posted in 2016, and outpaced inflation, which came in at just under 2%.The fourth-quarter results brought the average annualised returns for Spanish occupational funds to 3% for the three years to 31 December 2017, and 4.8% for the five-year period.At end-December total assets under management for the sector stood at €35.8bn, an increase of 1% over the year. The number of participants in the occupational system was stable at just over 2m.last_img read more

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