Borlaug Fellows

first_imgFor many Indian families, “pulse” crops – lentils and other legumes that are eaten as porridges – are essential. Not only are they an important source of protein, but these pulse crops can also grow on poor soil and produce lentils and legumes even with limited and erratic rainfall.Despite their resiliency, production levels of these important crops have declined over the past 70 years, according to Sushil Yadav, a Borlaug Fellow who spent four months at the University of Georgia Center for Applied Genetic Technologies working with Zenglu Li, learning “metabolic fingerprinting” skills that he’ll take back to India.“Eighty percent of the farms in the Hyderabad area of India are small and marginal,” said Yadav, who is a scientist at the Central Research Institute for Dryland Research there. “If we can identify the key genetic regulators for enhancing drought-stress tolerance in these crops, we can stabilize their productivity and increase their availability to a very large vegetarian population in India.”Yadav is one of three international researchers who studied with UGA faculty this spring as part of the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. The program, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service, promotes food security and economic growth by providing training and collaborative research opportunities to researchers and policymakers from developing or middle-income countries who are in the early or middle stages of their careers, according to the USDA’s website. At UGA, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs manages the program.Also studying at UGA through the Borlaug Fellowship Program are Direba Demisse of Ethiopia and Reham Fathey Aly of Egypt.“Ethiopia has more than 50 million head of cattle, but milk production is very low. In fact, we have to import milk from other countries,” said Demisse, national project coordinator for smallholder dairy cattle genetic improvement research at the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research in Holeta. “If we can use modern molecular technologies to increase the number of improved animals while conserving indigenous genetic resources and develop a clear breeding strategy, we can improve our country’s food security.”During his stay, Demisse worked with Ignacy Misztal in the college’s Department of Animal and Dairy Science.Aly, who will remain at UGA until late July, said she has learned a great deal about integrated pest management (IPM), which she plans to introduce to her colleagues in the agricultural zoology and nematology department at the Cairo University in Giza, Egypt.“I’ve learned so much about the principles of bioassay and how applicable the work I’m doing here will be in Egypt,” said Aly, who is working with Ashfaq Sial in the UGA entomology department. “Not only will the work I’m learning be useful in the management and mitigation of the peach fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly, but I hope to write a project that uses IPM for the control of snails, which have become a major pest in Egypt.”Sial, whose research includes developing new integrated pest management techniques to control spotted wing drosophila in blueberries, said he looks forward to traveling to Egypt later this year to continue his work with Aly.“One of the many benefits of the Borlaug Fellowship is the opportunity for mentors to travel to the fellow’s country,” he said. “At this point, Egypt has very little understanding of IPM techniques and relies more on chemical options to control pests. I think there are a lot of opportunities to establish partnerships with researchers there that could particularly benefit fruit and vegetable growers in both Georgia and parts of Egypt.”Borlaug fellows are selected annually based on research proposals submitted to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. Once the fellows have been selected, U.S. universities bid to host them, identifying research mentors and arranging logistics. Costs are covered by the Borlaug Fellowship Program.“We have been hosting Borlaug Fellows in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences since 2006 and have had researchers from Armenia, Rwanda, Malawi, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Kosovo, Iraq, Pakistan, the Philippines and Poland,” according to Victoria McMaken, associate director of the Office of Global Programs.“There are a number of benefits for both the individual fellows and mentors, but because all of these projects are related to food security, the University of Georgia, the state of Georgia and the United States all benefit from creating long-standing connections with university and research institutions throughout the world,” McMaken said.last_img read more

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6 reasons your members don’t heart you on social media

first_imgYour credit union has decided to dedicate some resources to improving your social media presence. By now, you most likely have the basics:  A Facebook page, perhaps even a twitter account. You post once or twice a week, maybe even less depending on how busy you are with other daily activities. Most small and medium-sized credit unions don’t have the deep pockets to warrant a fully-staffed marketing department, so the task of updating your pages is in the hands of your executive team or more likely the youngest/hippest employee on your payroll.You know that in today’s digital world, social media is another way to reach members and establish your credit union as a financial leader in the community. Almost every generation can be reached via social media, especially millennials, the largest generation in the US history, and the upcoming Gen Z population. The importance of social media cannot be overstated, especially when promoting credit union member services. However, despite best efforts, your base of followers might be stagnant. Here are 6 possible reasons your members aren’t engaging with your credit union on social media.You’re Strictly Promotional. Members don’t want to feel like they’re constantly being sold to via social media, let alone any marketing platform. If you’re only posting about promotions, members are quick to unfollow. Utilize the 80/20 rule when posting content: only 20% of content should be sales focused, while the remaining 80% should be focused on other efforts. continue reading » 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Dominicans given kudos for their participation in disaster weekend

first_img Share Share 7 Views   no discussions Share LocalNews Dominicans given kudos for their participation in disaster weekend by: – June 29, 2011center_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Dominicans are being encouraged to continue to carry out activities, to prepare themselves for any natural disaster.Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit declared the weekend of June 24th to 27th to deal with natural disasters.Chairman of the Cabinet Sub Committee responsible for the program Ambrose George says the weekend activities should go beyond that.There were heightened activities in some areas to a lesser extent in other areas. From all reports everything went well. Several persons turned out but it should not stop there…it must continue,” he said.George said he is hoping that the event becomes annual.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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DSC students encouraged to embrace learning and to take advantage of opportunities.

first_img Share EducationLocalNewsTertiary DSC students encouraged to embrace learning and to take advantage of opportunities. by: – August 30, 2011 Tweet Hon. Minister Mr. Kelver DArrouxHonourable Kelver Darroux explained to the new students that the opportunity to attend a tertiary institution should be embraced as there are many other students who cannot attend college due to unfortunate circumstances.“You should take advantage of the opportunity that the Dominica State College is making towards your advancement. I tell you because there are a number of students like yourself, who would have wished to have been given the opportunity, but unfortunately they are not here this morning. It’s not because it’s their fault but some simply because of the circumstances they have come a crossed today, whether financially or whether they have not been raised in a home that has given them the foundation to make the right choices in life.”Mr Darroux also explained that he wants to challenge our young people, “in today’s time you should not settle for the average. We do not explore our full potential and the capacity that our brain is able to work and generate we do not make ample use of it. So we have to challenge ourselves more as young people, we have to go out and do research, find out things for ourselves and empower and educate ourselves.Former students of the Dominica State College who volunteered to assist with the orientation programme reminded the students of the need for great organization and preparation and to avoid procrastinating as this can create major set backs.The volunteers further advised the students to seek help, you are new and not everything may come right away with the transition of high school to college. Your education is your responsibility and you have to set your goals to what you want to do and you need to be your own person, if you fail to plan you plan to fail.As part of the orientation, the Heads of Faculty Departments were also introduced to the students and they are as follows;Mr. Rawl Leslie, Dean Faculty of Applied Arts & TechnologyMs. Josephine Lewis, Dean Faculty of Arts and ScienceMrs. Mary Vidal, Dean Faculty of EducationMrs. Denise Edwards, Dean Faculty of Health ServicesMrs. Jacqueline Royer, Director of Learning ResourcesMr. Edgar Hunter, Director of Student Support ServicesMr. Henry Volney, Director of Admissions & Financial AidMrs. Catherine Abraham, BursarMr. Ashley Massicotte, RegistrarDr. Helen Francis-Steadman PhD, Vice PresidentDr. Donald Peters, PresidentDominica Vibes News 69 Views   one comment President of The Dominica State College – Dr. Donald Peters PhDPresident of the DSC Dr. Peters in addressing the opening ceremony encouraged the students to embrace learning.“Today you join millions of students all over the world, and today the world is smaller. You will require a college degree in order to work. Our education is one that runs smoother and the degree credits can be transferred to anywhere in the world, similarly students in other countries may also work in Dominica. In order to survive you have to pay attention to what is in front of you, and you must embrace learning.”Dr Peters also advised the students to organize their time and work as organization is the key and the responsibility for their success lies in their hands. Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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CREDITORS MEETING DATE SET FOR GLENEANY HOUSE LIMITED

first_imgA CREDITORS’ meeting has been called following the closure last December of a well-known Letterkenny Hotel.The Gleneany House Hotel in the town shut its doors with the loss of 15 jobs.A creditors’ meeting will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Letterkenny next Friday, April 8th, at 9.30am. When the hotel closed, owner Paul Kelly, said he had no choice but to close the 25 bedroom family-run business.He said at the time: “Today is a very sad day for the entire Kelly family and for me personally, as Gleneany House has been a major part of my life for almost 20 years, but due to very tough trading times, it is no longer economically possible to remain open.“I would like to thank everyone for supporting us down through the years, our customers, suppliers and most importantly, our loyal committed and hard working staff past and present,” he said.Gleneany House Hotel in Letterkenny had been open for the past 20 years and had enjoyed a solid reputation in hotel circles and particularly with tourists from Belfast. CREDITORS MEETING DATE SET FOR GLENEANY HOUSE LIMITED was last modified: March 29th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:April 8thcreditors meetingGleneany House Hotelletterkennylast_img read more

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South Koreas prime minister offers to resign over ferry

first_imgJINDO, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s prime minister offered to resign Sunday over the government’s handling of a deadly ferry sinking, blaming “deep-rooted evils” and irregularities in a society for a tragedy that has left more than 300 people dead or missing and led to widespread shame, fury and finger-pointing.The resignation offer comes amid rising indignation over claims by the victims’ relatives that the government didn’t do enough to rescue or to protect their loved ones. Most of the missing and dead were high school students on a school trip. Officials have taken into custody all 15 people involved in navigating the ferry that sank April 16, a prosecutor said. South Korean executive power is largely concentrated in the president, Park Geun-hye, so the resignation offer by Prime Minister Chung Hong-won appears to be largely symbolic. There was no immediate word from Park about whether she would accept Chung’s resignation. Chung was heckled by relatives and his car was blocked when he visited a shelter on an island near the site of the sinking a week ago. On Sunday, he issued an extraordinary statement to reporters in Seoul on the national tragedy.“As I saw grieving families suffering with the pain of losing their loved ones and the sadness and resentment of the public, I thought I should take all responsibility as prime minister,” Chung said. “There have been so many varieties of irregularities that have continued in every corner of our society and practices that have gone wrong. I hope these deep-rooted evils get corrected this time and this kind of accident never happens again.”last_img read more

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