Scott Metzger Announces The First RANA Show Since 2011

first_imgJoe Russo’s Almost Dead guitarist, the one and only Scott Metzger, will reunite with his RANA band members for a show at Brooklyn Bowl next Thursday night, May 5th. It has been several years since the New York/New Jersey rockers have shared the stage together, which should make for quite the celebration. In addition to the RANA lineup, which features Matt Durant (Keyboards & Vocals), Andrew Southern (Bass & Vocals), Scott Metzger (Guitar & Vocals), and Ryan Thornton (Drums), there will also be several special guests joining the band throughout the night.Watch a highlight of the band’s recent trip to the Bowl, back in 2009.Tickets for the show go on sale tomorrow, April 29th, and can be found HERE.last_img

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AGL Inductees

first_imgTwenty-five professionals, who represent a wide swath of Georgia’s agriculture and natural resource industries, have been chosen to participate in the 2019-2020 class of Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry (AGL).Organized by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, the purpose of AGL is to educate and empower Georgia’s agricultural leaders to become effective advocates for the largest economic drivers in Georgia — the state’s agriculture and forestry industries.“This class was chosen from 78 outstanding nominations,” said Lauren Griffeth, director of AGL. “These individuals represent a broad array of facets in agriculture, forestry and allied sectors and display a commitment to leadership in the field for their career.” The AGL program is designed to bring together leaders from all segments of the state’s agriculture, forestry, natural resources and allied industries. Over 16 months, participants will help one another grow through personalized leadership development training geared toward understanding themselves as leaders, analyzing issues facing their industries, and strengthening connections to become catalysts for positive change.AGL’s 2019-2020 inductees are:Daniel Atkins, area marketing manager, WeyerhaeuserToby Bowen, account manager, AGCOJason Bragg, vice president for government relations, Georgia EMCSam Brown, owner and CEO, Fiddleheads Garden CenterJordan Carter, director of sales and marketing, Leger & SonTR Clark, regional manager, F&W Forest ServicesHillery Culpepper, assistant director of development, FFA FoundationNicole Duvall, program coordinator, Commission for MilkDusty Engel, corporate precision ag manager, John DeereChan Flanders, forester, West FraserSusan Harrell, financial analyst and timberland ownerAaron Hemmer, regional lending manager, AgGeorgiaMatthew Hested, executive director of communications and strategy, Georgia Forestry AssociationJessica Jarvholhm, event coordinator, PineyWoods FarmBen Lancaster, sales manager, International Forest CompanyJason Little, director of valuation services, Forest Resource ConsultantsDavid Martin, president and CEO, Widget DevelopmentSamantha McLeod, executive director, Georgia Pecan Growers AssociationFrances Mitchell, field sales representative, BayerArren Moses, farmer, Edward Moses FarmsSarah Nerswick, agriculture education teacher and FFA advisor, Cambridge High SchoolErin Nessmith, Young Farmer and Rancher Program coordinator, Georgia Farm BureauBlake Poole, middle Georgia field representative, Office of Governor Brian KempEric Simpson, farmer and co-op organizer, West Georgia Farmer’s CooperativeKeaton Walker, marketing and sponsorship director, Georgia National Fairgrounds & AgricenterIn 1991, community and state leaders started participating in the original, agriculture-based leadership development program known as “Agri-Leaders,” which was sponsored by the Georgia Agri-Leaders Forum Foundation. Since that time, 399 Georgia business leaders, farmers, foresters, educators and other stakeholders have completed the program and become more effective leaders and advocates.Through AGL, participants will complete five in-state institutes, an advocacy institute in Washington, D.C., and an optional international experience in Chile. This will be the fourth class of AGL participants to experience transformational leadership development through the UGA program.Those seeking more information about AGL can visit www.agl.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Cricket News We made mistakes under challenging conditions, says Rahane

first_imgLondon: India vice-captain Ajinkya Rahane has admitted that the visiting batsmen committed mistakes under challenging conditions as his side were bowled out for just 107 runs in the first innings of the rain-affected second Test against England at Lord’s.  The inept technique coupled with fragile temperament of Indian batting was thoroughly exposed as they crumbled to 107 all out against a top quality England seam attack on a rain-hit second day on Friday.“I don’t think you can get any more challenging conditions than this (in Test cricket) especially with Duke ball in these weather conditions. But as a batsman you have to back your ability. It is all about intent out there, of not only scoring runs but also leaving the ball and defending well. As a batsman it is always a challenge to come here and play against this kind of attack,” Rahane said.“You have to accept your mistake. Acceptance is the key, I think, when you play in England. It’s not about getting caught behind, even run out, but you have got to accept your mistake and move on. The quicker we learn from our mistakes, the better for us. I am sure everyone will learn from this innings and there is a long way to go in this match as well as the series,” he said.Pacer James Anderson took 5/20 as only two Indian batsmen crossed the 20-run mark. The Dukes ball swung prodigiously as rain interrupted India’s first innings thrice on day two.“These were definitely challenging conditions. Anderson did not bowl a short ball. He was just bowling at same spot—four or five metre length—and that is really crucial on this wicket. If you are bowling that length, you got to bowl consistently, then as a batsman you have to leave the ball or back your methods consistently. It is all about patience on these conditions and trusting your methods and backing your ability,” said the visiting team vice-captain.“Anderson was really good. He bowled in the right areas. Bowling 13-14 overs for 20 overs and getting five wickets is really good, and that’s why he is a quality bowler.”India were not helped by the fact that Cheteshwar Pujara was run out for the third time this year after a horrendous mix up with skipper Virat Kohli.“It definitely hurts as a teammates, and I am sure even Pujara will be upset about his run out. The run out definitely hurt us and the weather after that too. I think we did not get to play for 3-4 hours, so definitely as a team you feel really bad,” said Rahane who could contribute just 18 from 44 balls.Rahane, who himself found it tough to contend with Anderson and Chris Woakes, said his side’s batting line-up would do well by learning from their counterparts on how to play on these conditions.“You have to conquer every situation. May be we will need to learn from their batting unit how to bat in such conditions, which shots are important, which shots you can play, etc. Many times in England you cannot only stay defensive. You need to understand which shots you can play—may be the cut shot or the late cut. So the earlier you learn all that the better it would be for you,” he said.Asked about his own batting, he said, “Before I got out today I was thinking about my innings at Lord’s in 2014. I think we had less time to bat out, about 25-30 minutes to bat out this evening. In my head I only had one thought if we could bat out today then tomorrow it could be totally different.”Despite a low total, Rahane tried to put up a brave face for his side and said they cannot make excuses for another poor batting effort overall. He added that the team would continue fighting in this game with three days still left to play.“They used the conditions really well. I thought the wicket, because of the weather we cannot control. First half, when the game was on and off, it was difficult for batting team to switch on and off. But when you play at the highest level, no excuses. I would like to give credit to English bowling team—Anderson, Stuart Broad and others—they bowled really well as a unit.“You cannot be too harsh on yourself as an individual and team when you get conditions like this. You have to back yourself as a player and team. I felt we were right there skill wise. There is still a long way to go in this match. We have to bowl well, and our bowling unit is doing well. If weather permits, I am sure our bowlers will bowl in the right areas well. Cricket is a funny game, we still have to back ourselves and get positive mind set back,” he said.Asked if the Indian line-up is too dependent on Kohli, Rahane said, “I don’t think there is anything wrong. Just because you don’t get any runs or any start, that does not mean your methods are wrong. It is a five-match series and it is a long way to go.“It is important that you back yourself in English conditions and trust your methods. I think still you need luck in these conditions. But there are no complaints at all, we have to bowl and field well.”India also lack a third full-time pacer. Instead, they have opted for two spinners, with Kuldeep Yadav included ahead of Umesh Yadav.The vice-captain said that in drier conditions, Kuldeep could wreak havoc. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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Messengers of Peace: The wings of Peace

first_imgNehemiah B. Fensuah is a graduate of Economics at the African Methodist Episcopal University on Camp Johnson Road.He’s one of the 1,000 (and counting) volunteer peace messengers working on peace advocacy, mediation and volunteerism in Liberia. Drawing on the synergy of these volunteers, Messengers of Peace (MOP) – Liberia has been able to disseminate its peace messages to over 25 percent of Liberian youth.Our peace clubs — the wings of peace — concentrate mostly in Monrovia and its environs. In the hinterland regions of Lofa, Grand Gedeh, Maryland, Gbarpolu and River Cess, MOP-Liberia is yet to reach those anticipated prime targets.What MOP-Liberia needs right now is access to technology, social skills and resources that can help get our messages of peace across to young Liberians in the hinterland. We need the connectivity.As one of the nation’s leading youth-based NGOs, MOP-Liberia is committed to assisting young people across the country to be better informed about peace building initiatives and about the importance of peace in sustainable development efforts.Our volunteers keep up with us and every day, they go above and beyond the call of duty to sustain peace.-Gwendolyn S. Myers-Executive Director/Messengers of Peace-Liberia (MOP)-Read on.My name is Nehemiah B. Fensuah and I am 27. I am a resident of Barclay Avenue, 14th Street, Sinkor, and a graduate of the African Methodist Episcopal University, where I obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics in 2010. I see volunteerism as a way of giving back to society, contributing, and helping individuals and society at-large. It is working with others to make a meaningful contribution to a better community and society.Liberia, as a nation has emerged from a 14-year devastating civil conflict that stemmed from bad governance practices and other vices. The effect of the war destroyed the fabrics of our society. Although we have made some gains, by sustaining peace over the past 10 years, and improved governance to some extent, our post-conflict environment is still fragile and there is more work that needs to be done to achieve sustainable peace and development in Liberia.These are reasons that have motivated me to become a volunteer peace messenger at the Messengers of Peace (MOP) – Liberia.I see the Messengers of Peace (MOP) – Liberia as one the core non-governmental organizations in the country that are working assiduously with young people to spread messages of peace and non-violence in our country.  As we know that young people make up a huge segment of our population, I see the urgent need to work with young people to consolidate the peace we have enjoyed over the past 10 years.I chose to volunteer with the Messengers of Peace – (MOP) among others because of the reputation and credibility MOP has acquired both locally and internationally since its establishment in 2008.At MOP, I’ve worked with the team for the “A Dollar for Peace Concert”, and I look forward to coaching and mentoring adolescent girls and boys in peace building, as well as working on youth engagement and leaderships programs.I believe that without peace, there is no progress we can make as a nation and world. Peace generates a sense of security in our minds and helps us to live in a society and world which is far better from hostility. Peace is especially important in our society today, because it makes a better environment for the next generation, and helps us to live in harmony.I will therefore like to encourage other young people to join this great initiative and try to “change their minds and attitudes” to behaviors that foster sustainable peace, reconciliation, and development.In the next five years, as an aspiring economist, it is my dreams to pursue advance training in Development Economics that will enable me contribute more effectively to Liberia’s post-war development, through devising and executing development strategies in Liberia.I also plan to prepare myself for a future in development research, as well delving into critical issues viable for informing policy in Liberia and across countries in the sub-region.Messengers of Peace is a great help in me achieving my goal by rendering me the opportunity to give back to society, and creating a framework that I can work with other young people to consolidate peace in Liberia. We‘re making an investment for peace in Liberia, and through the involvement of young people we’re building the groundwork for growth.  Join us.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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