8 repatriated OFWs arrive in Roxas City

first_imgEight overseas Filipino workers who were stranded in Cebu return in Roxas City onboard a plane chartered by the city government on May 14. They are currently at the city’s isolation center in Barangay Milibili undergoing a 14-day mandatory quarantine. GLENN BEUP ROXAS City – Eight overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who were stranded in Cebu since last month due to travel restrictions brought by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were repatriated onboard a private plane chartered by the city government.They are the third batch of repatriates who arrived in this city.After arriving at the city’s airport around 4 p.m. on May 14, the OFWs were immediately transported to the city’s isolation facility in Barangay Milibili to undergo a 14-day mandatory quarantine, mayor Ronnie Dadivas said.A rapid test was then conducted to them there, and they all yielded negative results for COVID-19.Prior to their arrival in the city, they also tested negative for the virus in Cebu using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction machine.On May 14 also, 6 OFWs – two women and four men – who were stranded in Manila finished their mandatory quarantine in the city’s isolation facility.“To our OFW’s repatriates, salamat sa inyo suporta kag kooperasyon sa pagsunod sa patakaran sang aton quarantine facility,” Dadivas said.The overseas workers were immediately welcomed by their family members.On the other hand, 14 residents here who were stranded in Boracay Island, Malay, Aklan were picked up by the city government yesterday.All of them also yielded negative results in the rapid test for COVID-19.(With a report from PIA/PN)last_img read more

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Thousands Evacuated As River Dams Break in Central Michigan

first_imgMIDLAND, Mich. (AP) — Rapidly rising water overtook dams and forced the evacuation of about 10,000 people in central Michigan, where flooding struck communities along rain-swollen waterways and the governor said one downtown could be “under approximately 9 feet of water” by Wednesday.For the second time in less than 24 hours, families living along the Tittabawassee River and connected lakes in Midland County were ordered Tuesday evening to leave home. By Wednesday morning, water that was several feet high covered some streets near the river in downtown Midland, including riverside parkland, and reaching a hotel and parking lots.The river rose Wednesday morning to 34.4 feet (10.5 meters) in Midland, topping a previous record reading of 33.9 feet (10.3 meters) set during flooding in 1986, the National Weather Service said. Its flood stage is 24 feet (7.3 meters), and it was expected to crest by day’s end at about 38 feet (11.6 meters).The Weather Service urged anyone near the river to seek higher ground following “castastrophic dam failures” at the Edenville Dam, about 140 miles (225 kilometers) north of Detroit, and the Sanford Dam, about seven miles (11 kilometers) downriver. The evacuations come as Michigan remains under a stay-at-home order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, said downtown Midland, a city of 42,000 about 8 miles (14 kilometers) downstream from the Sanford Dam, faced an especially serious flooding threat. Dow Chemical Co.’s main plant sits on the city’s riverbank.“In the next 12 to 15 hours, downtown Midland could be under approximately 9 feet of water,” the governor said during a late Tuesday briefing. “We are anticipating an historic high water level.”Steve Carlson, 61, said he and his wife, Patty, fled their Midland home about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday on their own accord after an evacuation order was issued for large swath of the city and they noticed neighborhood creeks were spilling over local roads, threatening some homes.“They had risen a lot and the worst was yet to come,” he said Wednesday morning.One couple who lives in their neighborhood decided to stay put, but Carlson said everyone else evacuated themselves from the area. They spent the night in a hotel. He said they’ve been wearing face masks in the hotel to protect themselves from the coronavirus.“The hotel was very happy to be see people coming in. There were refugees coming in,” he said with a laugh.Further down the Tittabawassee River, communities in Saginaw County were on alert for flooding, with a flash flood watch in effect Wednesday.“It’s going to continue downriver,” Sara Pampreen, a weather service meteorologist, said Wednesday morning. “Just exactly how much, that’s the question.”Whitmer declared a state of emergency for Midland County and urged residents threatened by the flooding to find a place to stay with friends or relatives or to seek out one of several shelters that opened across the county. She encouraged people to do their best to take precautions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, such as wearing a face covering and observing social distancing “to the best of your ability.”“This is unlike anything we’ve seen in Midland County,” she said. ”If you have a family member or loved one who lives in another part of the state, go there now.”Emergency responders went door-to-door early Tuesday morning warning residents living near the Edenville Dam of the rising water. Some residents were able to return home, only to be told to leave again following the dam’s breach several hours later. The evacuations include the towns of Edenville, Sanford and parts of Midland, according to Selina Tisdale, spokeswoman for Midland County.“We were back at home and starting to feel comfortable that things were calming down,” said Catherine Sias, who lives about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the Edenville Dam and first left home early Tuesday morning. “All of a sudden we heard the fire truck sirens going north toward the dam.”Sias, 45, said emergency alerts then began coming on her cellphone and people started calling to make sure she was safe.“While packing, there were tons of police and fire trucks going up and down the roads,” she added. “As far as I know, all of our neighbors got out.”Dow Chemical has activated its emergency operations center and will be adjusting operations as a result of current flood stage conditions, spokeswoman Rachelle Schikorra said in an email.In 2018, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission revoked the license of the company that operated the Edenville Dam due to non-compliance issues that included spillway capacity and the inability to pass the most severe flood reasonably possible in the area.The Edenville Dam, which was built in 1924, was rated in unsatisfactory condition in 2018 by the state. The Sanford Dam, which was built in 1925, received a fair condition rating.Both dams are in the process of being sold.There were 19 high hazard dams in unsatisfactory or poor condition in Michigan in 2018, ranking 20th among the 45 states and Puerto Rico for which The Associated Press obtained condition assessments.Flood warnings in Michigan were issued following widespread rainfall of 4 to 7 inches (10.2 to 17.8 centimeters) since Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. Heavy runoff pushed rivers higher.last_img read more

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Deputies accused of arrest ‘competitions’

first_imgThe Sheriff’s Department was under fire from law enforcement experts today over contests to see which Lakewood station deputies could make the most arrests, impound the most vehicles and question the most gang members in a 24-hour period. An e-mail written Aug. 15 described one recent competition — “Operation Any Booking” — designed to arrest as many people as possible within a specific 24-hour period. Lakewood-based sheriff’s Lt. James Tatreau, the e-mail’s author, said the intent was motivational and said the only prize was “bragging rights.” “No way, no how did anyone encourage officers to falsify a report or an arrest,” he said. Another competition, dubbed “Operation Vehicle Impound,” aimed at seizing as many cars as possible. It took place July 11 and dramatically increased the number of vehicles seized. A third competition challenged deputies to see how many gang members and other suspected criminals could be stopped and questioned. That produced a spike in such interviews. Some police accountability experts, civil libertarians and defense attorneys condemned the competitions, saying they trivialized traumatic encounters such as arrests and having a car impounded. “It’s crazy,” said Jane White, the associate director of the National Center for Community Policing. “I’m at a loss for words. I’ve never heard of anything like this before.” Hubert Williams, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Police Foundation, which promotes innovative policing strategies, said that the competitions were “highly problematic and inappropriate.” Sheriff Lee Baca said the competitions were well-meaning but ill-conceived. For the latest news and observations on crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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