Mark Tomlinson resigns as CEO of Bako North Western

first_imgBako North Western Group group CEO Mark Tomlinson has resigned with immediate effect for personal reasons.Group chairman Joseph Hall announced Tomlinson’s resignation and revealed Paul Ogle (pictured right), former managing director of Johnsons the Cleaners, will be named interim CEO until a successor is found.Tomlinson will leave Bako North Western after nine years, and eight years as CEO of the company.Hall said the board “is thankful for Tomlinson’s years of service and leadership.”“We understand and support his decision to step down and are grateful for his many accomplishments,” Hall said. “We wish him and his family the very best for the future.”During his time at Bako North Western, he cycled the length of the country from John O’Groats, north of Scotland, to Land’s End, Cornwall to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Care in July 2016. He also raised £5,000 for the Royal British Legion by cycling from Manchester to St Ives in 2013.last_img read more

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Willie Nelson, Bonnie Raitt, & More Team Up For All-Star “Harvey Can’t Mess With Texas” Concert [Video]

first_imgIt’s been a rough month for natural disasters affecting North America, and the artist community has come together to show their support in various benefit concerts around the country. On September 22 at Austin’s Frank Erwin Center, great legends Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, James Taylor, Bonnie Raitt and more hosted the Harvey Can’t Mess With Texas benefit concert. Performances from Leon Bridges, Lyle Lovett, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Edie Brickell & New Bohemians, Ryan Bingham and Ha*Ash also highlighted the event. The house band featured Charlie Sexton as musical director with Asleep At The Wheel. All proceeds from the concert went to benefit the Rebuild Texas Fund.The event was live streamed on Friday night, and was highlighted by several surprise moments and collaborations. Willie Nelson and Bonnie Raitt performed a duet of “Texas Flood” by Stevie Ray Vaughn; Nelson teamed up with Leon Bridges to perform his original “Funny How Time Slips Away”; Paul Simon delivered versions of “America” by Simon & Garfunkel and a cover of Ernest Tubb‘s “Waltz Across Texas” with his wife Edie Brickell; James Taylor performed “Country Road,” as well as “You Can’t Close Your Eyes” with Bonnie Raitt. The performers all joined together for a concert-closing rendition of “On The Road Again.”You can watch the full performance in the video below, courtesy of KHOU 11:last_img read more

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Professor lectures on Dante’s literary and theological influences

first_imgDr. Robin Kirkpatrick, poet, professor emeritus of Italian and English Literature at the University of Cambridge and scholar of Dante and the Renaissance, delivered the University’s annual Religion and Literature lecture, titled “The Pace of Praise: Might Theology Walk Together with Literature?”Dr. Kirkpatrick, whose 2006 translation of Dante’s epic poem “The Divine Comedy” has been described as “one of the most important contributions to Dante scholarship of recent times,” spoke about the relationship between religion and literature with a particular focus on “The Divine Comedy” and how literary works like it are connected to the art of praise.“One impulse, common to literary study and theology, is a desire to cultivate and promote the language of intelligent praise” Kirkpatrick said, “But it may also be said that the point of theology in one of its aspects is to prepare our language for its use in performance, prayer and literature, and focusing our thoughts on … praise.”Kirkpatrick said Chaucer’s “Troilus and Criseyde” and “Purgatorio” the second part of “The Divine Comedy” are works of literature that can be a approached as a form of theological discovery.“The late Middle Ages saw the invention, or re-invention, of literature as an independent field of human endeavor,” he said. “The texts in question call into play …  the stress between pain and praise that a Psalm might display, but equally, for scrupulous attention to language.”Kirkpatrick said the combination of Dante’s use of detailed theological augmentation and distinctly poetic language characterized the way praise is approached in literature, particularly the slow tempo at which it is delivered.“As capable as Dante is of the highest flights of imagination, grotesquery as well as ecstasy, the foundation of his art is an unremitting clarity of articulation,” he said. “As incarnate beings we speak at our best not in high-flown rhetoric, but along the pulse of silence.”Following the logic of Dante’s references to faith revealing itself in infidelity, authors who may be seen as “searching, violent or even blasphemous” can make a serious contribution to theological studies, and similarly, the use of surprising language in the Psalms can make a contribution to praise as a form of literature, Kirkpatrick said. He said the end of Psalm 137 is one such example.“Scripture is full of scandals, which may shock the poet out of cliche, or predictable sentiment,” Kirkpatrick said.Dr. Kirkpatrick is a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the departments of Religion and Literature at Notre Dame this semester.Tags: Dante, Pace of Praise, Psalmlast_img read more

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