Fr. Jim Martin to offer talk on LGBT community and church

first_imgCampus Ministry, the Gender Relations Center (GRC) and the Center for Social Concerns will co-sponsor a lecture delivered by live video Monday night. Fr. Jim Martin will discuss his book “Building A Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion and Sensitivity.” The lecture starts at 6 p.m. in DeBartolo Hall room 101, and Martin will answer questions until 10 p.m.One of the organizers for the event, Fr. Joe Corpora from Campus Ministry, said he wanted to bring Fr. Martin’s lecture to campus to spark a discussion about how students can identify as LGBT and be members of the Church.“The way I began this whole thing at Notre Dame is that I kept running into students who were totally of the Church, had left the Church,” Corpora said. “But then I would run into other students who were on the way out or maybe quietly out but really still wanted to be Catholic. And I thought, ‘Well if they come out and leave the Church, then who’s going to be left for the Church?’”After reading Martin’s book, Corpora said he had a mutual friend introduce him to Martin, so he could ask about giving the talk.“It’s the most tame book you’re going to read,” he said. “All it’s trying to say is how the Church and a community — namely the LGBT community — might each learn to respect and value each other,” Corpora said. “I thought it’s important that we offer something for students — whoever they happen to be — to think about this.”Corpora said he received some pushback from individuals about the talk, but not from the Notre Dame community.“I will talk with anybody,” Corpora said. “But this borders on being hateful, the way the email is written: ‘We are calling for the immediate rescinding of this invitation, and this priest does nothing but promote animalistic urges inside of humans,’ which is simply not true.”Corpora said Martin’s message aligns with Church teaching.“First of all, he’s not promoting homosexuality,” he said. “Second of all, he’s not saying not to be chaste.”Corpora said a planning committee, which included individuals from the GRC and Campus Ministry, as well as four students, helped to coordinate the event.Sophomore Francesca Denegri, a member of the planning committee, said she thinks it’s important for Notre Dame to invite a speaker who will address this topic.“A lot of times, students have criticized how Notre Dame kind of isolates the LGBTQ community, but this is such a leap in actually opening up the conversation … and not just hiding behind it,” Denegri said.After the lecture, attendees will be given a piece of paper with a prayer on one side and resources such as the GRC and PrismND on the other. Two follow-up sessions will also be offered the following week for students who may want to discuss the topic further, Corpora said.Corpora said he hopes the lecture will open the conversation on campus about the relationship between the LGBT community and the Church.“If you don’t have the conversation, the Church loses, and so does the LGBT community,” he said. “It’s like everyone loses, so let’s have a conversation, at least to talk with each other. I hope it will provoke more discussion at Notre Dame on a topic that’s not going to go away, either in the world or in the Church.”Tags: Building a Bridge, Campus Ministry, Center for Social Concerns, Fr. Joe Corpora, Gender Relations Centerlast_img read more

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Royal Navy tests underwater gliders in North Atlantic

first_imgRoyal Navy is trialing underwater gliders in the North Atlantic, that can rapidly send vital information during submarine hunting operations. One of the Slocum Gliders is being tested in the seas west of Scotland during a five-month deployment. The data is being integrated into ocean forecast models by the Met Office and is available for use by the Navy at the Joint Operational Meteorology and Oceanography Centre at Northwood. The intention is for the navy to eventually deploy gliders continually to high-threat areas to give a clear and constant picture of the underwater battlespace, meaning operational decisions will be based on the very latest information. During these latest tests, the project has been able to look at reducing power consumption of on-board sensors to extend battery life and resolve teething issues of getting data from the shore-side receivers to the Met Office. The way sound travels through water is greatly affected by the water temperature, pressure and salinity, which impacts the effectiveness of sonar and sensors used by ships and aircraft to track submarines. “Ocean environments are changing – what we knew 20 or 30 years ago doesn’t apply now in many areas, particularly the North Atlantic which is our backyard for submarine operations and probably one of the most complicated and challenging bodies of ocean,” said Captain Pat Mowatt RN. The Slocum was due to stay out for four weeks but has been extended to up to five months, giving the project the opportunity to test the glider to its limits on a long duration mission for the first time. These trials are supported by the National Oceanographic Centre, British Oceanographic Data Centre and the Scottish Association of Marine Science. Having this data quickly means sub-hunters will be able to adapt better when they are attempting to detect underwater surface threats. The gliders can provide up-to-date information on these matters quickly to TAC HM (tactical hydrography, meteorology and oceanography) trained officers who can then advise submarine hunting commanders about the range of the ship’s sonars and how to adjust settings for best results. The glider can dive down to 1,000 meters using controlled buoyancy to drive itself to the surface and back down, which ultimately means it can stay out at sea for months on end and constantly send data. Right now, the Royal Navy continues to trial these gliders as part of Project Hecla. One of them is currently off the North West coast of the Outer Hebrides. “Salinity, sound velocity and temperature have all changed. We need to know these accurately as we strive to understand more and more about the undersea environment (battlespace) and how this effects the performance of ship and submarine sensors so we can achieve an operational advantage.” Project Hecla was established to optimise the Navy’s ability to collect and exploit hydrographic and oceanographic information and they are continuing to look at other opportunities on top of the gliders. The unmanned Slocum is capable of sending near real-time information on temperature, depth, salinity (salt content), currents, oxygen levels, turbulence and more. A better understanding of water column properties can also reveal insight into how an adversary might exploit the environment to ‘hide’ in underwater features, such as ocean fronts and eddies. Project Hecla is also involved in maintaining safety of navigation for all ships using autonomous vehicles. The project will also trial how autonomous vehicles can aid data collection and exploitation missions alongside NavyX, who are responsible for developing and testing new technology for potential use on the frontlines. These parameters can impact the efficiency of the sonar and sensors used by the Type 23 frigates and Merlin and Wildcat helicopters – as well as the Royal Air Force’s P-8 Poseidon – during submarine hunting operations. Data from trials of the REMUS autonomous underwater vehicles is used to produce Admiralty Charts for maritime navigation systems.last_img read more

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Sharma equals fastest T20 ton

first_img(Reuters) – INDIA’S Rohit Sharma on Friday equalled the fastest century in Twenty20 International cricket from only 35 balls to set up the hosts’ massive 88-run victory against Sri Lanka and a series win with a match to spare in Indore.Opening batsman Rohit, leading India in the absence of the newly-wed regular captain Virat Kohli, matched the record South Africa’s David Miller set against Bangladesh in OctoberRohit, the only batsman to hit three double hundreds in the 50-over format, added 165 with fellow opener Lokesh Rahul to power India to 260-5 in their 20 overs for the joint-highest total by a team in what is the shortest format of the game.In reply, Sri Lanka, who lost the opening match by 93 runs at Cuttack on Wednesday, were bundled out for 172 in the 18th over to go down 2-0 in the three-match series after also losing in tests and one-day internationals.India’s wrist spinners once again did the damage for the hosts with leg-spinner Yuzvendra Chahal taking 4-52 while left-armer Kuldeep Yadav picked up 3-52.Angelo Mathews could not bat due to an injury as Sri Lanka’s chase screeched to a halt after they lost six wickets in two overs from the spinners.Kusal Perera top-scored with 77 off 37 balls for the touring side, who had also gone down 9-0 across formats to India at home earlier in the year.The 30-year-old Rohit smashed 10 sixes and 12 fours before he was eventually dismissed for 118 in 43 balls on a featherbed of a wicket at the Holkar Cricket Stadium, where Sri Lanka captain Thisara Perera won the toss and opted to field.Four of Rohit’s sixes came in consecutive deliveries off Thisara which took him to 97 and he completed his second hundred in the format with a four on the next ball he faced from seamer Angelo Mathews.Rahul took charge after Rohit’s dismissal and added 78 for the second wicket with former captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni before falling for 89 off 49 balls.India were well on course to eclipse the highest T20 International total of 263-3, which was set by Australia against Sri Lanka in 2016, but lost their way by losing four wickets in the last two overs of their innings.Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium will host the final match of the tour on Sunday.last_img read more

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Cazenovia’s Smith makes state boys swim meet in two races

first_imgBut throughout the long race, Smith proved a bit quicker than Merkling, and then he pulled away in the last 100 yards, finishing in 4:48.77 to Merkling’s 4:51.74, an improvement of nearly 17 seconds from earlier this season.Since the state qualifying standard was 4:52.52, Smith easily gained a place on the Section III team that will go to Long Island’s Nassau Aquatic Center for the March 6-7 state meet – and he’ll do so in two events.Earlier in the sectional meet, Smith attacked the 200 individual medley. Again, Merkling was the main opposition and this time the Liverpool junior won in 1:57.92. However, Smith, needing to record 2:00.63 to reach the state meet, finished in 1:59.63 to advance. That was an improvement of more than eight seconds over his previous best of 2:08.23.Moving to Saturday’s sectional state qualifier, Smith would go 4:49.92 in the 500 freestyle, finishing a close second to Syracuse’s Belal Hamad, who posted 4:49.71 to get to the top spot.In the 200 IM, Smith improved 1:58.92, still second to Merkling, who won in 1:56.95. And in the 400 freestyle relay, Smith, joining Lucas Weires, Eric Bang and Ben Rabin, went 3:19.94, again second to Liverpool, who went 3:17.79.Three other Cazenovia students swam at the sectional Class A meet, too, with sophomore Cooper Hughes making his way to 18th place in the 50 freestyle in a season-best 24.48 seconds.Freshman Max Vidakovic took part in the 100 backstroke, finishing 24th in 1:09.41, and eighth-grader Eddie Comeau swam in the 100 breaststroke, getting 22nd place in 1:15.58.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story All through this winter, four Cazenovia High School students have taken part in boys swimming with Fayetteville-Manlius, competing in home meets a few blocks from their home campus at Cazenovia College.That included sophomore Quinn Smith, who would go to Thursday’s Section III Class A championships at Nottingham High School and secure spots in next month’s state meet in two different events, winning the 500-yard freestyle.Going into the meet, Smith has posted a time of five minutes, 5.70 seconds that made him the third seed, well behind Liverpool’s Griffin Merkling, the top seed at 4:56.86.center_img Tags: Cazenoviaswimminglast_img read more

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Visitors to mountain ski resorts are transported back in time

first_imgWhile Lake Arrowhead has no official “town center,” its Village serves as the main shopping district, with 50 factory outlets, boutiques, restaurants and a supermarket. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger chose Lake Arrowhead Village as the backdrop for a news conference last fall, when he urged tourists to return to the fire-blackened communities. “Our business is doing well here. We’ve come back after the fires and just had a real surge of shoppers,” said Linda Griffith, spokeswoman for Lake Arrowhead Village. “The shopping experience here is nice because most of the business owners are local residents, and it’s a friendly environment.” The communities also have holiday events planned for December, including weekend visits with Santa and performances by the Dickens Carolers from Rim of the World High School. Ten minutes to the west of Lake Arrowhead lies Blue Jay Village, home to Betty’s General Store, the historic Royal Oak Restaurant and County Furniture, which specializes in mountain-theme furnishings. It’s also the location of Jensen’s Finest Foods, the oldest grocery store on the mountain with renowned baked goods including breads, tortillas, chips and pastries. “They have busloads of people come in for their baked goods,” Griffith said. “They have a Bavarian chocolate brownie that I love.” Holidays and especially chocolate are a big draw in the mountains. Big Bear Valley celebrates the delectable treat in a unique fashion that also showcases its bed and breakfasts. The Holiday Bed and Breakfast Chocolate Tour, held this year the first weekend in December, invites visitors to admire the beautifully decorated lodgings while sampling chocolate. In some places, visitors were encouraged to taste it, in others to make it and at one stop, the delicacy was served up as a decadent facial treatment.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Nestled among the snow-capped peaks and tall pine forests, the quaint hamlets and resort towns that dot the San Bernardino Mountains draw visitors yearning for slices of a simpler life. A stroll through Lake Arrowhead, Big Bear or Blue Jay Village can be like a trip back in time – back to the days of general stores and family cafes. “People come into our store to just get away from a busy life and to walk around and enjoy the environment,” said Jay Tait, owner of the 28-year-old Bear Mountain Trading Company in Big Bear Lake. “There’s a lot of nostalgia in the store.” Wander upstairs in Tait’s place and find a room stocked year-round with Christmas ornaments and decorations. An old-fashioned candy counter sells jawbreakers, licorice and assorted “penny” treats. The store also sells its own brand of jams, jellies and sauces, along with an array of wildlife d cor. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champIn neighboring Lake Arrowhead, Sondra’s/Tattle Tails is among the most popular stops for shoppers in search of women’s and children’s clothing. “If you buy an outfit there, you won’t find another person in another one of those outfits anywhere else,” said Leslie McLellan, director of marketing and tourism for the Lake Arrowhead Communities Chamber of Commerce. “It’s the quintessential women’s clothing store.” The same hospitable vibe can be felt at Woody’s Boathouse, a family-owned steak and seafood restaurant that has operated on the peninsula of Lake Arrowhead for 16 years. The walls are lined with dozens of vintage photographs of movie stars and of the early days of the village. The booths are crafted from the old wooden Chris Craft boats that used to travel the lake in bygone days. “Every seat has a great lake view,” said general manager Dee Dee Romack, whose father, Randy, owns the restaurant. last_img read more

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