Laudrup unhappy with late penalty

first_img However, the Swans, who had let leads slip in the dying moments of both Europa League meetings with Kuban Krasnodar, were denied again when Madley, taking charge of only his third Premier League game, decided Wayne Routledge had handled after Steven Nzonzi flicked on a Robert Huth header. Substitute Charlie Adam made no mistake from the spot as the Potters snatched a point. Laudrup conceded the ball had “maybe” struck Routledge on the arm, but he was deeply unhappy with the decision despite attempting to be careful with his words in order to avoid any action from the Football Association. He said: “In every game there are talking points over decisions, but when I saw it again, or even out there, there are seven Stoke players in the box and none were asking for a penalty, apart from Peter Crouch, who was appealing for a corner. “So there was only one man in the stadium who thought it was a penalty, and unfortunately that was the referee. “But the referees are not allowed to say anything and I have to be careful what I say otherwise I will get a fine or a sanction. “Of course we can all make mistakes and say we are sorry, the players can do the same. But we have to leave the referees, it would be nice if the referee said ‘sorry, it was a mistake’.” When it was put to him that the ball had struck Routledge’s arm, Laudrup said: “Maybe, but it is not always handball if it touches you. A thrilling Liberty Stadium encounter ended in a 3-3 draw, a result which had looked unlikely when Stoke roared into a 2-0 first-half lead as Jonathan Walters and Stephen Ireland produced composed finishes. But Wilfried Bony got one back early in the second half, before Nathan Dyer levelled and the Ivorian struck his 10th goal of the season to put Swansea ahead with four minutes to go. Press Association Swansea manager Michael Laudrup felt referee Robert Madley owed him and his players an apology after seeing his side suffer stoppage-time agony for the third time in four games against Stoke. “Whenever there is a handball there are players trying to do something to make the referee give handball. “But there were seven Stoke players in the box, none of them asking for the penalty. “It was in the last minute, if Stoke thought it was handball I am sure they would try to ask for it. So why give it? “It would have been a fantastic win and it is all away because of a very, very bad decision.” He added: “I have not spoken to the referee, I do not know the rules on that so I have to be careful. I have heard you cannot even say a referee is good before the game or you can get fined, so I can’t say much more as I don’t have £10,000 to waste.” But Laudrup did praise his side’s fightback after a poor first-half display. “I just feel so sorry for my players given how they performed after a difficult start to the game, 2-0 down after 20 or so minutes,” he said. “We couldn’t believe it but we continued to play in a difficult situation. We came out in the second half and kept Stoke in their box for the entire second half. “We scored one, then the second and what should have been the winner, and then this happens in the last minute.” Stoke boss Mark Hughes saw his side’s winless run extend to eight league games, but was happy to take a point, although he did have sympathy for Laudrup. He said: “I have seen it and I can understand why Swansea are aggrieved about it, but those things can go for you or go against you and we are grateful we got a break. “It still had to be dispatched and Charlie did well as he had not been on long and showed good mental strength to get us a point, which at that stage it looked like we were not going to get. “In the first half we were excellent, we came with a gameplan and executed it. “We knew there would be a response, we knew they would put us under pressure, and we could have handled it better. “To concede three goals in the manner we did was not what we have been about this season.” last_img read more

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Badgers get 2nd shot at earning NCAA tourney bid

first_imgThe No. 3-seeded Wisconsin men’s soccer team (9-7-2, 3-2-1 Big Ten) begins its Big Ten Tournament run today as it takes on a No. 6-seeded Michigan squad (6-9-4, 1-2-3) at 12:30 p.m. in Columbus, Ohio at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.Following a loss to Indiana in the Big Ten title match this past week, Wisconsin fell into a tie with Ohio State for second place in the conference with 10 points. Unfortunately for the Badgers, the Buckeyes secured the No. 2 seed based on their head-to-head victory over UW earlier this season.With the NCAA tournament looming over the horizon, this week’s Big Ten Tournament could be the deciding factor as to whether or not the Badgers receive a bid.Following the team’s disappointing stretch of three losses to end the season, Wisconsin head coach Jeff Rohrman admits his team might need to win all three games and capture the Big Ten Championship in order to get an NCAA bid.”We’re definitely a bubble team, there’s no question about it,” Rohrman said. “I think we’re disappointed with the results last week, and we’re clearly in a position where we have to go to Columbus and, in my opinion, probably win three games.”To a certain degree, Wisconsin’s late-season woes may become all the more painful as the Badgers hope for a tournament berth with seven losses to the record.”There [have] been teams that have been in the [NCAA] tournament with eight or nine losses in the past three or four years,” Rohrman said. “So, you never know. As I told the guys [Monday], all you can really focus on is what you can bring and what you can control, and then just let things kind of fall into place as they may.”While the Badgers slipped at the end of the season, the ferocious Wolverines made the most of their final two Big Ten matches, earning a point against Ohio State in a 0-0 draw and bagging all three points in its final match of the season, a 1-0 victory over Penn State, which earned Michigan goalkeeper Patrick Sperry the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week honor.When asked about his team’s performance in the crucial 1-0 loss to Indiana this past week, Rohrman admits playing the seven-time NCAA champions at home is always as difficult as it gets.”Winning at Indiana is no easy task — it’s a daunting challenge,” Rohrman said. “Yet, at the same time, I thought we had two or three very good chances that we just didn’t find the frame with. The goal [Indiana] scored was off a long throw — it wasn’t off creative, quality attacking play. But, I give them credit, they won the game … and I thought overall they might have played a better game than we did.”In its previous meeting with Michigan this season, Wisconsin won 2-1 in dramatic fashion, benefiting from a fluke own goal in extra time to give the Badgers their first Big Ten win.”You know, you create your own luck — and that’s from persistence and hard work,” Rohrman said in reference to the Michigan own goal. “I thought on that day, we did that. I like how we match up against Michigan, and certainly we should be confident in how we played against them earlier in the year.”Although they were victorious, Rohrman believes his squad should have sealed the victory before extra time, and admits his team will need to bring the same emotion and intensity they brought in the last meeting.”In thinking about that game, I thought we played a pretty complete game,” Rohrman said. “We brought the intensity and the emotion that we needed to on that day. I thought we were a little unfortunate not to get away with a win in regulation … but, we’ve learned from that, we’ve talked about it, and thankfully we were able to get the win.”As an NCAA bid has not been secured yet, tonight’s game could, in fact, be the final match for Wisconsin’s seniors. With the stakes higher than ever for eight Badger seniors tonight, the intensity should be high as well.”I know that [the seniors] are extremely motivated,” Rohrman said. “They know this potentially could be their last week to wear a Wisconsin uniform, and, as I told Hamid [Afsari] — I don’t want this to be [their] last week. They’re going to be really inspired and ready to meet the challenge this week.”The winner of tonight’s showdown will play the victor of the No. 2 Ohio State/ No. 7 Michigan St. match in a semi-final on Friday at 6:30 p.m.last_img read more

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Vin Scully says realistically 2016 will “be the last one”

first_imgDodgers fans rejoiced Friday night when it was announced that 87-year-old Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully would return for a record 67th season.Then came a sobering thought Saturday afternoon, delivered by the golden voice of Scully himself in his press conference to talk about returning for 2016.“I would say realistically, and I don’t want any headlines, but I would say next year would be the last one,” Scully said, eloquent as ever. “I mean, how much longer can you go on fooling people? So yeah, I would be saying, ‘Dear God, if you give me next year, I will hang it up.’”Then as he has done throughout his career, Scully put it in perfect perspective. “Let me put it this way,” Scully said. “I saw Mel Allen leave the Yankees. I saw Red Barber leave the Dodgers. I saw Russ Hodges leave the Giants. I saw Harry Caray leave the Cubs. I saw Jack Buck leave the Cardinals. And you know what? Not one of those teams missed a game. They kept playing, and the fans kept going. And I will just go along where they are, and be very happy and privileged to be in that company.“I know I can be replaced. They’ve all come and gone, and I will join that same group.”Scully dismissed the idea of a farewell tour, particularly since he does not travel with the team on the road. He said the Dodgers’ success on the field — even if they win the World Series this year — will not factor into his decision to return in 2016.But Scully said he will continue to do what he has loved for 66 seasons.“If there’s one little bit of poetry that I’ve always remembered, it’s that line from Dylan Thomas, and most of you probably know the same thing,” Scully said. “Where he wrote, ‘Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.’ Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img “And I guess in a way, that’s what I’m doing. I’m raging against the dying of my career, which has to be around the corner now. But at least for the God-given time I have left, I’ll be raging.”Scully said he had his wife Sandy’s blessing. It is a decision they normally make together.“Sandy is remarkable, she really is,” Scully said. “The biggest thing she told me is “I don’t want you home babysitting me. If you are at home, you will become an old man just waiting to do something around the house.’ She said if I still want to do it and still feel I can do it, I had her blessing.”last_img read more

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Banja Luka is Host of World Parachuting Championships

first_imgIn August, the World Parachuting Championships will take place in Banja Luka, confirmed the Aviation Union of the RS.‘’The World Aviation Federation (FAI), through the International Parachuting Commission (IPC), whose conference was held in Vienna on 28 January, confirmed that in August the World Parachuting Championship will take place in Banja Luka’’, said in a statement by the Aviation Union.‘’After problems with the Parachute Club Banja Luka, the relevant authorities of the RS Aviation Union adopted a decision that all aviation clubs from the RS would participate in the organization of the competition, which guarantees a successful organization’’, said in the statement.At the conference in Vienna, the President of the B&H Aviation Association Duško Grmuša, President of the Aviation Club of the RS Ranko Seferović and delegate of the B&H Aviation Association in the International Parachuting Commission Vladan Stojković represented the interests of the aviation clubs from the RS.(Source: klix.ba)last_img read more

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