Sea quality in Croatia rated “excellent”

first_imgThe share of bathing places with excellent water quality in European countries The number of beaches that met the strictest quality standards and received the rating of “excellent” increased slightly, from 85 percent in 2017 to 85,1 percent last year. If we take into account the bathing areas that have met the minimum requirements for the assessment of “satisfactory quality”, the picture is somewhat different. There were 2017 percent of such beaches in 96, and slightly less in 2018 – 95,4 percent. The main reason for this is the opening of new bathing areas, and according to the Bathing Water Directive, the classification is based on data for four bathing seasons. Last year, the water quality in 301 bathing areas (1,3% of them) in the EU, Albania and Switzerland was assessed as “poor”, compared to 1,4% in 2017. According to the latest annual report on monitoring the quality of bathing water in Europe, more than 85 percent of European bathing areas surveyed met strict EU standards and were rated “excellent” for water purity, including Croatia with a quality of 94,4 percent. The results published today are a good indicator of where the best bathing water can be found this summer. European Environment Agency Executive Director Hans Bruyninckx added that “the report confirms that the efforts of the member states have paid off over more than 40 years, primarily in the field of wastewater treatment. Most Europeans today enjoy excellent quality bathing water. Still, this is just one of the main issues, along with plastic pollution and the protection of marine life, that we need to address in order to make our seas, lakes and rivers healthier.” “Yesterday we marked World Environment Day. We face many challenges and that is why it is important to remember the success stories from the European Union on the topic of ecology. The quality of European beaches is one such story that is close to everyone. By testing, reporting, monitoring and exchanging expertise, we strive to improve the quality of our favorite beaches. The new review of environmental activities will allow Member States to show each other how best to achieve and maintain the excellent standards that have been achieved during my term of office. I thank the European Environment Agency for its help in improving standards and sending reliable information on a regular basis, because based on this information you will easily be able to choose where to swim this summer.”, Said Carmenu Vella, European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries. As many as 95,4 percent of the 21.831 bathing areas in the 28 EU Member States covered by the monitoring met the minimum quality requirements in accordance with EU regulations, as stated in this year’s report of the European Commission and the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report also includes 300 beaches in Albania and Switzerland. Bathing water requirements have been established EU Bathing Water Directive. By implementing its provisions, we have significantly improved the quality of bathing water in Europe in the last 40 years. This directive introduced effective monitoring and management, and in combination with investments in urban wastewater treatment, there has been a drastic reduction in the amount of untreated or partially treated wastewater from households and industry discharged into watercourses. Local authorities are required to collect water samples at official bathing areas during the bathing season. The samples are then searched for two types of bacteria whose presence indicates contamination caused by wastewater or animal waste.last_img read more

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Geeks Guide to Amazon Prime Day 2017

first_imgStay on target Amazon’s ‘Marvelous’ Gas Station Discount Causes Chaos in CaliforniaAmazon to Donate Unsold Products Instead of Trashing Them On your mark, get set, shop!Amazon Prime Day 2017 begins tonight at 9 p.m. Eastern—promising 30 hours of deals for techies, beauty fans, gamers, kids, home chefs, bookworms, fitness buffs, DIYers, sports enthusiasts, and other stereotypes.If you’re not already a Prime member, now’s a great time to sign up for a 30-day free trial.“Our teams have been working for months to source exciting and interesting deals,” Greg Greeley vice president of Amazon Prime, said in a statement. “Our fulfillment centers are loaded with products, our operations associates are ready and our transportation partners around the world are excitedly waiting for the first Prime Day order.”Amazon’s yearly rollbacks aren’t the only annual deductions, though: Since 1952, Black Friday—the day after Thanksgiving in the US—has marked the beginning of the holiday shopping season.“Amazon talks a big game telling Black Friday to ‘step aside,’” deal aggregator BestBlackFriday.com said in a recent blog post, analyzing deals from the previous two Prime Day events.And the online retailer is not wrong: 64 percent of Prime Day 2015 prices were better than Black Friday, while 77 percent of Prime Day 2016 discounts trumped that year’s post-Thanksgiving shopping spree, according to the blog.“Amazon views Prime Day as a Black Friday competitor, so we feel as though it is our duty to hold them to such a bold claim,” BestBlackFriday said. “While Black Friday still wins in sheer volume, Prime Day has a lot to be excited about.”BestBlackFriday.com’s Prime Day 2017 tips:Keep personal information up to date. Scrambling for your credit card could take minutes that you don’t have to spare.Download Amazon’s free app. It will be easier to make purchases on an actual computer, but the application is “a vital tool for any successful Prime shopper.”Add products to your shopping list. If items are included in Prime Day, you will receive a notification.Prepare for long hours. “For the complete Prime Day experience, you are going to have to sacrifice a little sleep.” Stay up late Monday, get up early Tuesday. Shop around. “While we cannot provide specific details yet, we have spoken to numerous large retailers regarding their competing Prime Day sales this year. We’ll just say you should not do all your shopping at Amazon on Prime Day if you want the best deals.”Prime Day 2017 deals comparison:Amazon Echo: Now $89.99 (save $90): $50 less than Black Friday 2016, $40 less than Prime Day 2016Amazon Echo Dot: Now $34.99 (save $15): $5 less than Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2016Kindle Paperwhite: Now $89.99 (save $30): $10 less than Black Friday 2016, same price as Prime Day 2016Fire 7 tablet: Now $29.99 (save $20): $3.34 less than Black Friday and Prime Day 201632-inch 720 TCL TV: Now $99.99: $30 more than Black Friday 2016, same price as Prime Day 2016Additional Prime Day 2017 sneak peek:$40 off Fire HD 8 Kids Edition (now $89.99)Four months of Amazon Music Unlimited streaming for $0.99 (with purchase of Echo device, Fire TV streaming media player, Fire tablet)25 percent or more off AmazonBasics20 percent back on select items with Amazon Prime credit cardUp to 50 percent off grocery items by Amazonvia AmazonPrime Day 2017 tips for Alexa shoppers:Prime members with an Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show, Amazon Tap, compatible Fire TV, or a Fire tablet can start spending earlier, and continue longer:Beginning at 7 p.m. Eastern, voice shoppers get exclusive early access to select reductions. And have access to Alexa deals through July 17.Just ask “Alexa, what are your Prime Day deals?” and snag a $10 credit when you order an Alexa Deal of $20 or more.Prime Air cargo planes are ready to fly in the U.S. (via Amazon)This year’s buying bonanza is set to be Amazon’s biggest: According to new data from securities research firm Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP), Amazon Prime membership has increased 35 percent in one year—from 63 million US members at the end of June 2016 to 85 million today.A Prime subscription costs $10 per month, or $99 a year. Amazon last week announced that customers with a valid Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card can sign up for Prime’s two-day shipping and other perks for just $5.99 monthly.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

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