Tedeschi Trucks Band Covers The Beatles, Welcomes Doyle Bramhall II At Beacon Finale

first_imgAfter five incredible shows, Tedeschi Trucks Band brought it all home last night with one grand finale at the Beacon Theatre in New York. The band wrapped up a six night run in style, riffing heavily on the music of The Beatles throughout the night.The show started on a high note with “Anyday,” and kept rolling with a number of TTB classics, as well as covers of Taj Mahal and Bobby “Blue” Bland. The band dove into the Beatles extended catalog during their second set, playing George Harrison’s “Wah Wah,” “I’ve Got A Feelin’,” Paul McCartney’s “Eleanor Rigby,” as well as the encore of “With A Little Help From My Friends.”The band also welcomed out guitarist Doyle Bramhall II, a regular collaborator during their Wheels of Soul tour this summer. Bramhall sat in for three songs, “Honest I Do,” “Simple Song” and “Higher.” Bramhall accompanied on vocals and harmonica for the first song, then picked up a guitar and traded licks with Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks to the delight of fans in attendance.Check out videos (courtesy of Sean Roche) and a setlist from the performance below!AnydayLeavin’ TrunkIdle WindCalling Out To YouWah WahHonest I Do ft. Doyle Bramhall IISimple Song > Higher ft. Doyle Bramhall IIAnyhowWith A Little Help From My FriendsSetlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band at The Beacon Theatre, New York, NY – 10/8/16Set One: Anyday, Laugh About It, It’s So Heavy, Don’t Know What > Leavin’ Trunk, I Pity The Fool, I Want More > Idle WindSet Two: Calling Out To You, Just As Strange, Wah Wah, Let Me Get By, I’ve Got A Feelin’, Eleanor Rigby, Cryin’ Over You, Honest I Do*, Simple Song* > Higher*Encore: Anyhow, With A Little Help From My Friends* = w/ Doyle Bramhall IIlast_img read more

Read more

Outdoor Updates: Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers

first_imgPlainfield Township officials have approved zoning to protect their 1½-mile section of the Appalachian Trail. It will prevent projects like natural gas pipelines, wind turbines, solar panels, and cellphone towers from being located near the scenic footpath. The Truth About Recycling: Why Recycling has stopped in many places in the U.S. The global recycling system wasn’t ever perfectly eco-friendly. Recycling operators had been known to illegally burn or bury recycling waste, causing a ripple effect of pollution including contaminated water, killed crops, respiratory illnesses, and long-lasting negative impacts on the environment overall. What happens to the waste we think we’re recycling? For decades, many countries, including us, send plastic waste to China and Southeast Asia for recycling. But just last year, China and many other Asian countries, banned the import due to the overwhelming amount they already had, according to the Business Insider. This has tragically lead to burning and landfills in many of our major cities. center_img Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers The Morning Call reported that The Appalachian Trail Conservancy provided a $16,900 grant covering the cost of a consultant from the Bethlehem-based Urban Research and Development Corp. to draft an ordinance with the township. The ordinance includes guidelines for controlling light pollution, the withdraw of groundwater, digital signs, noise, commercial outdoor recreation, residential developments, solar panels, natural gas pipelines and wind turbines.last_img read more

Read more

Talisay City scholars complete digital training

first_imgOn October this year, 22 scholars fromKabankalan City have also completed the digital marketing and e-commerce coursewhile last month, 20 trainees graduated in Escalante City from virtualassistance technical training.  “Digital Job PH is really intended foremployment generation,” he added. The Digital PH Project, which startedin 2017, mainly aims to provide technical training to unemployed andfinancially unstable residents in the province enabling them to landICT-related jobs.(With a report from PNA/PN) Romeo Tome (standing, 3rd from right), the provincial officer of the Department of Information and Communications Technology-Negros Occidental, with the trainers, local government personnel, and scholars in Talisay City, Negros Occidental who completed the Digital Jobs PH Technical Training Project on Dec. 17. The batch comprised of 17 graduates. The DICT provides training on variouscourses, including general virtual assistance, digital marketing ande-commerce, content writing, search engine optimization and advertising, socialmedia marketing and advertising, graphic design, and web development. The recipient-local government unitshave shouldered the cost of the training venue, computer units, food and snacksof the trainers. The trainees underwent a virtualassistance technical training, which included a six-day face-to-face seminarand a 21-day online session, which began on Nov. 11 and ended on Dec. 17. “Most of our completers areInformation Technology (IT) graduates, some are household mothers. They are alljobless,” said Romeo Tome, provincial officer of the DICT-Negros Occidental, onWednesday. “If there’s available budget, moresites can be covered. In fact, we already have pending requests. Moreemployment positively contributes to the growth of the province’s economy,” headded.center_img BACOLOD City – A total of 17 scholarsin Talisay City, Negros Occidental comprised the latest batch of graduates ofthe Digital Jobs PH Technical Training Project of the Department of Informationand Communications Technology (DICT).   In implementing the project, theDICT-Negros Occidental provides the training and identifies the appropriatemodule depending on the budget allocation. Tome said the DICT-Negros Occidentalaims to implement the project in two sites per province every year. In Negros Occidental, 24 scholars inSan Carlos City and 22 others in Cadiz City have been trained in digitalmarketing and e-commerce in 2017 and 2018, respectively. He added two of the scholars haveimmediately landed online jobs. After completing the modules, Tomesaid the participants underwent a 21-day exposure, which enabled them to lookfor employment online. The recipients should be 18 years oldand above, at least high school graduates and computer literates. last_img read more

Read more

‘Pink out’ planned in Greensburg

first_imgGreensburg, In. — The Decatur County Memorial Hospital encourages the community to support breast awareness Friday, October 26.While the entire community is encouraged to wear pink, employees at the Decatur County Memorial Hospital will donate $5. Those funds will be used to help those less fortunate get the mammograms they need for preventive care.Residents are encouraged to post pictures of their pink outfits on social media.last_img

Read more

Thousands Evacuated As River Dams Break in Central Michigan

first_imgMIDLAND, Mich. (AP) — Rapidly rising water overtook dams and forced the evacuation of about 10,000 people in central Michigan, where flooding struck communities along rain-swollen waterways and the governor said one downtown could be “under approximately 9 feet of water” by Wednesday.For the second time in less than 24 hours, families living along the Tittabawassee River and connected lakes in Midland County were ordered Tuesday evening to leave home. By Wednesday morning, water that was several feet high covered some streets near the river in downtown Midland, including riverside parkland, and reaching a hotel and parking lots.The river rose Wednesday morning to 34.4 feet (10.5 meters) in Midland, topping a previous record reading of 33.9 feet (10.3 meters) set during flooding in 1986, the National Weather Service said. Its flood stage is 24 feet (7.3 meters), and it was expected to crest by day’s end at about 38 feet (11.6 meters).The Weather Service urged anyone near the river to seek higher ground following “castastrophic dam failures” at the Edenville Dam, about 140 miles (225 kilometers) north of Detroit, and the Sanford Dam, about seven miles (11 kilometers) downriver. The evacuations come as Michigan remains under a stay-at-home order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, said downtown Midland, a city of 42,000 about 8 miles (14 kilometers) downstream from the Sanford Dam, faced an especially serious flooding threat. Dow Chemical Co.’s main plant sits on the city’s riverbank.“In the next 12 to 15 hours, downtown Midland could be under approximately 9 feet of water,” the governor said during a late Tuesday briefing. “We are anticipating an historic high water level.”Steve Carlson, 61, said he and his wife, Patty, fled their Midland home about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday on their own accord after an evacuation order was issued for large swath of the city and they noticed neighborhood creeks were spilling over local roads, threatening some homes.“They had risen a lot and the worst was yet to come,” he said Wednesday morning.One couple who lives in their neighborhood decided to stay put, but Carlson said everyone else evacuated themselves from the area. They spent the night in a hotel. He said they’ve been wearing face masks in the hotel to protect themselves from the coronavirus.“The hotel was very happy to be see people coming in. There were refugees coming in,” he said with a laugh.Further down the Tittabawassee River, communities in Saginaw County were on alert for flooding, with a flash flood watch in effect Wednesday.“It’s going to continue downriver,” Sara Pampreen, a weather service meteorologist, said Wednesday morning. “Just exactly how much, that’s the question.”Whitmer declared a state of emergency for Midland County and urged residents threatened by the flooding to find a place to stay with friends or relatives or to seek out one of several shelters that opened across the county. She encouraged people to do their best to take precautions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, such as wearing a face covering and observing social distancing “to the best of your ability.”“This is unlike anything we’ve seen in Midland County,” she said. ”If you have a family member or loved one who lives in another part of the state, go there now.”Emergency responders went door-to-door early Tuesday morning warning residents living near the Edenville Dam of the rising water. Some residents were able to return home, only to be told to leave again following the dam’s breach several hours later. The evacuations include the towns of Edenville, Sanford and parts of Midland, according to Selina Tisdale, spokeswoman for Midland County.“We were back at home and starting to feel comfortable that things were calming down,” said Catherine Sias, who lives about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the Edenville Dam and first left home early Tuesday morning. “All of a sudden we heard the fire truck sirens going north toward the dam.”Sias, 45, said emergency alerts then began coming on her cellphone and people started calling to make sure she was safe.“While packing, there were tons of police and fire trucks going up and down the roads,” she added. “As far as I know, all of our neighbors got out.”Dow Chemical has activated its emergency operations center and will be adjusting operations as a result of current flood stage conditions, spokeswoman Rachelle Schikorra said in an email.In 2018, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission revoked the license of the company that operated the Edenville Dam due to non-compliance issues that included spillway capacity and the inability to pass the most severe flood reasonably possible in the area.The Edenville Dam, which was built in 1924, was rated in unsatisfactory condition in 2018 by the state. The Sanford Dam, which was built in 1925, received a fair condition rating.Both dams are in the process of being sold.There were 19 high hazard dams in unsatisfactory or poor condition in Michigan in 2018, ranking 20th among the 45 states and Puerto Rico for which The Associated Press obtained condition assessments.Flood warnings in Michigan were issued following widespread rainfall of 4 to 7 inches (10.2 to 17.8 centimeters) since Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. Heavy runoff pushed rivers higher.last_img read more

Read more