The perks of being a credit union member

first_imgLast year, banks raked in over 6 billion dollars from ATM and overdraft fees — that’s right, people were charged for using their money. Luckily, credit union members don’t have this problem. At a credit union, there are less fees, more account protection and services to help your financial wellness. Check out the many benefits of choosing a credit union over a bank.You’re not just a customer—you’re a member-ownerWhen you join a credit union, you become a member-owner of the financial institution. Credit unions are not in business to make stockholders richer like banks, they aim to maximize stakeholder value. This means credit unions work to pass the profits to you, the member-owner, and this is done by offering lower interest rates, fewer fees and situation-based lending needs. Ask yourself: would I rather be a customer or a member? Choose membership. It’s rewarding. continue reading » 60SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Message to Big Ben—Be a leader, a mentor, not a crybaby (Feb. 20)

first_imgBEN ROETHLISBERGERSince shortly before the final 2018 NFL regular season game was played at Heinz Field between AFC North divisional rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cincinnati Bengals, “the soapbox has been turnin’ and reputations have been burnin’”…All while Steelers starting quarterback Ben “Big Ben” Roethlisberger has been using the “fake news” radio and TV outlets to shift the blame for his shortcomings in a way that appears as if as he’s been mentored by the 45th President of the United States.Roethlisberger is essentially on record saying that he has earned the right to be critical of his teammates. On Nov. 28, 2018, after the Steelers lost a critical game in Denver to the Broncos, USA Today sportswriter Lorenzo Reyes posted the following quotes from Roethlisberger after he called in for a radio interview trying to blame everyone except Jed Clampett for tossing the game-ending pick. “I think I have earned the right to be able to do that [criticize his teammates] with as long as I have been here,” Roethlisberger said. “I’ll just be just as critical on myself as well in front of you guys. You have to know how to motivate different guys in different ways. I think that’s part of being a leader, being a captain, just understanding players. So sometimes you just grab them off to the side, and sometimes you have to be honest with them.”Hey “Big” Ben, how about being honest with yourself when you throw game-ending picks?Is Ben Roethlisberger the quarterback, the head coach and the offensive coordinator all wrapped into one? It has been also rumored that in a team meeting he allegedly said this to Antonio Brown: “I don’t have to throw you the ball.”Does that statement by Roethlisberger reveal that he thinks that he is superior to his offensive coordinator and head coach? Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown seems to think so. Brown recently tweeted the following. “He has an owner mentality like he can call out anybody including coaches. Players know but they can’t say anything about it otherwise they meal ticket gone. It’s a dirty game within a game.” Roethlisberger has that entitled, “I can’t do anything wrong attitude.”Roethlisberger also criticized rookie wideout James Washington for failing to reel in an overthrown errant pass thrown near him by “Big Ben” late in the third quarter. “He has to make (the catch),” Roethlisberger said. “I just think he didn’t trust his hands.”Has Roethlisberger become a mind reader?“Yes, he’s a rookie, but you can’t be out there if you’re not going to make those plays for us.”“Big” Ben must have forgotten that all of his veteran teammates were not totally thrilled with him during his rookie year. Lest we forget; on Sept. 21, 2004, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette sports columnist Ed Bouchette penned an article shortly after the Steelers then-rookie QB Roethlisberger took over for the Steelers’ injured starter Tommy Maddox. Former Steelers O-lineman Alan Faneca was asked was it exciting that the young quarterback was at the helm. “Exciting?” Faneca replied to a question in an are-you-crazy kind of way. “No, it’s not exciting. Do you want to go work with some little young kid who’s just out of college?” It’s a learning process for him. He’s a No. 1 pick, he’s fresh out of college and that’s the big thing. He’s throwing in a new offense. He’s not in that Miami, Ohio, offense that he sat in for three years, four years. He has to learn that, too, so there’s a lot to soak in.”Hey Ben, there is a lot of knowledge that younger players have to soak in. It’s also a process for James Washington. Remember that you were rookie a couple of decades ago and they trusted in your “raw” abilities. Now is not the time for tears and sniffles. Be a leader, a mentor and not a crybaby. Like us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourierlast_img read more

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Olympia Area Events Weekend Update: May 21st – 22nd:

first_imgCREDIT: www.mostexpensive.netSaturday May 21st:                         If you love or collect comic books, do not miss the Tenth Annual Olympia Comics Festival in the Capitol Theater this Sunday. The festival opens at 10:30AM and tickets cost only $5! This year’s stage show includes interviews with special guests Paul Chadwick, Meagan Kelso and Larry Gonick. There will also be contests, prizes, and more. After the stage show, head over to the Olympia Center for the Northwest Cartoonist Expo from 1:30pm to 6:00pm (the cost is free!) and visit Danger Room Comics downtown for book signings. This festival is all-ages and open to the public.For more information about this year’s festival visit: www.olympiacomicsfestival.org Saturday May 21st:                         Take advantage of the wonderful spring weather this weekend and come out to the BBQ by the Lake and Spring Fair Concert (5700 Columbus Park Black Lake Blvd SW Olympia, WA 98512)! From 11AM-7PM this Saturday and Sunday, enjoy hours of jam-packed entertainment including art shows, cooking demonstrations, local bands, face painting, and animal balloons. Not to mention the finger-licking barbeque that will be provided by Barb’s BBQ and Catering. Don’t miss this great family fun event! Facebook0Tweet0Pin0Saturday May 21st:                         Inspire your young readers at Barnes and Noble Children’s Story Time at their location near the Capitol Mall (1530 Black Lake Blvd SW Olympia, WA 98512). Story time begins at 1PM in the children’s book section.last_img read more

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County to Decide Little Silver Winery Proposal

first_imgBy John BurtonLITTLE SILVER – The debate over a proposed commercial winery for a Seven Bridges Road property is moving outside the borough in early August when it will be considered by Monmouth County officials.The county’s Agricultural Development Board is scheduled to hear the controversial proposal during its Aug. 7 meeting in Freehold. The plan, submitted by Seven Bridges Winery, LLC, seeks to operate a winery and retail outlet on the property overlooking the Shrewsbury River that the owner now uses as a vineyard and residence.Seven Bridges Winery is asking the county board for its approval by asking it to issue a site-specific agricultural management practice plan.The plan, submitted to the county board and filed on Feb. 9, is requesting “an exemption of municipal site plan review” with approval under the state statute commonly referred to as the Right to Farm Act.Richard DeBlasi, the owner of the site, is “requesting the Monmouth CADB (County Agricultural Development Board) affirm that the sale of wine is an accepted farm market practice,” under state statute. “We also request that we can bottle (package) the agricultural output of the farm and establish a farm market facility (“Tasting Room”) without the expense and burden of municipal site plan review,” according to DeBlasi’s application.When the application is heard, along with those issues, the board will likely discuss matters of ingress and egress at the site because Seven Bridges Road is a county road, said Harriet Honigfeld, program coordinator for the county’s Division of Planning.DeBlasi has been growing grapes on about 5 acres of the approximately 15-acre tract he has owned for the past 10 years. A total of 12.7 of the acreage is assessed as farmland. Prior to DeBlasi owning it, the location was a farm that grew and harvested hay, according to the application.DeBlasi did not return phone calls by press time seeking comment on his move to seek county approval for his plan.His attorney, Patrick Accisano, Sea Girt, was unavailable for comment.Previously, borough officials expressed concern that forwarding the application to the county was an attempt to circumvent borough approval on a plan that has stirred some controversy locally, with a number of area residents voicing opposition, fearing a commercial operation in a residential zone, and all that would entail – additional noise, traffic.Residents who appeared before the borough council when the proposal was first floated “were uniformly against it,” Mayor Robert Neff Jr. saidThe state statute, approved in 1983, is intended to protect farms and farmers from public and private nuisance actions and unduly restrictive municipal regulations, according to the state Department of Agriculture.Early in 2012, DeBlasi appeared before the borough council on two occasions to talk about his proposal and seek a zoning change that would allow the winery as a permitted use in the area.“He didn’t get any interest from the council,” for that measure, said Neff.Without the zoning change, DeBlasi could have sought a use variance from the borough Zoning Board of Adjust­ment, which would have meant meeting a fairly rigorous legal burden to show the negatives of the project didn’t outweigh any positives it would have brought. Instead he moved to the county seeking its approval.“At the end of the day what we’re looking to do is to make absolutely sure when and if the (county) board approves this proposal, the (borough) council retains control over safety, health and welfare issues, particularly with regards to traffic and health codes that apply,” Neff saidThe Agricultural Develop­ment Board meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 7 in the freeholders’ meeting chambers.last_img read more

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Election 2017: Two Challenge Incumbents for Middletown’s Township Committee

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN – It’s been nearly a decade since a Democrat was elected to the Middletown Township Committee but that is not stopping a pair of first-year candidates who are looking to buck the trend as they face off against two GOP incumbents in the Nov. 7 election.Running for their third and fourth terms, respectively, on the township committee are Deputy Mayor Stephanie Murray and Committeeman Tony Fiore, both Republicans. Challenging them are two Democrats new to having their names on a November ballot – Will Hutton, endorsed by the local Democrat organization, and Tricia Maguire, a Democratic Party write-in candidate. All candidates are vying for two open seats on the five-person committee, which comes with a three-year term.Republicans say the crux of their campaign is to continue the fight on a number of local issues important not only to Middletown, but also regionally specific to Monmouth County.Fiore, 40, a senior vice president at Prudential Investments who oversees a national retirement sales division, said one of his key platforms is to limit the amount of affordable housing which could make its way to Middletown in the future.Democratic Party candidate Will Hutton is a retired township employee.According to a presentation by township officials this summer, there are 492 affordable housing units across Middletown’s 41 square miles. Nearly 57 percent of the affordable housing is represented by two senior housing complexes: Conifer Senior Housing and Bayshore Village. Both are located on “the wet side” of Route 36.Fiore said he’d fight if quotas became exorbitant.“Some court may say that we are well under the quota on where we should be and that could have a tremendous impact on development, taxes, and services in Middletown,” he said.Running with Fiore for a third consecutive term is Stephanie Murray, 42, who works for the Borough of West Long Branch as the borough administrator, a position she took this past summer.Murray pointed to the opioid crisis threatening New Jersey, and said she’s been part of a number of township initiatives to lessen the threat locally. The Middletown Municipal Alliance, a drug and alcohol prevention program, is free to residents who use the service. Murray said the program is made available to middle school students with parental consent.“I think it’s a tremendous asset because it really teaches the kids from a young age to be aware of this,” she said, referring to opioid addiction.Regarding more pressing issues concerning residents – the Monmouth County Reliability Project (MCRP) and the Village 35 development – both Republicans commented on the former, yet declined to comment on the latter.Democratic Party candidate Tricia Maguire was boosted onto the ballot by write-in votes.Fiore and Murray were part of the Middletown administration which authorized a shared defense agreement among other towns which would be affected by the MCRP, a 230-kV transmission line along 10 miles of NJ Transit commuter rail line from Aberdeen to Red Bank. Over $100,000 has been spent in that fight.“I think we’re going to be successful because at the end of the day, after our due diligence, I don’t believe that the project is warranted,” Fiore said.Both Republicans said they couldn’t comment on the Village 35 application, a 52-acre commercial complex planned along Route 35 North. Its fate is currently pending before the township’s planning board.Murray did offer a general statement about her views on applications submitted in town.“We’ve entrusted residents to those boards,” she said. “I trust they will make the right decision and I trust the residents when they go to those meetings to make themselves heard.”Democrats running this year share a similar platform – underrepresentation of political diversity on the governing body – which they feel has become a detriment to the township.  Maguire, a 47-year-old small business owner, was added to the ballot after she said she received 153 write-ins from residents. It is her first run at elected office.“When you hold up a mirror, the committee is not really reflective of what our township looks like,” Maguire said, alluding to the all-Republican governing body.One of Maguire’s primary goals, in an effort for transparency, would be to create a “community coalition,” where leaders of advocacy groups from different sections of Middletown can meet regularly to discuss different issues affecting different parts of town.The idea stems from her other platform issue this election: overdevelopment.Maguire pointed to the Village 35 application and the impact it would have on surrounding residents. She believes the process has become overwhelming for many.“No one is negating an individual’s right to develop property if they own it,” Maguire said. “I think the concern is the pace at which it happens and residents feel the developer’s wants are being more elevated than their needs.”The other Democrat running this election season is also focusing on giving residents more of a say in what goes on in town. Hutton, 47, is retired and owns Love and Laughter Productions, a film and broadcasting company. For 26 years, he worked for Middletown as a senior traffic maintenance worker.As a township employee, Hutton said he was in the Bayshore in the wake of Super Storm Sandy, helping repair traffic signals and street signs. That experience has motivated him to look for more funding for homeowners in the Bayshore section of town, so they don’t think about leaving.Still vacant and forlorn properties from the 2012 storm affect everyone, said Hutton. “(Residents) all say they’re from different sections, but if the tax revenue brings more people into the Bayshore, that will bring those home values up.”Regarding Village 35, Hutton said he is “not against any development.” Like his Democrat counterpart, he just wants “responsible development. More input form the community, have their voices heard, and find a response,” he said.Both Hutton and Maguire were critical of the MCRP, doubting its need in a time of renewable energy, and worried about the effect it would have on Middletown residents.Maguire described herself as a “Rager,” a term given to members of the group Residents Against Giant Electric (RAGE) who are fighting the proposal. When asked about the project, Hutton said, “I would say, ‘No. Hell no.’ ”This article was first published in the Oct. 12-19, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Sahara plays role of Grinch, steals Leafs Christmas

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily SportsTalk about the Grinch stealing Christmas. Talk about those poor souls down in Nelsonville who now have to spend Christmas without their green candy or two green points.Dylan Sahara took all the greenly momentum heading into the break to the top of Mount Crumpit scoring with just over a second remaining in the second overtime period to lift the Grand Forks Border Bruins to a 6-5 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the  Nelson Leafs Sunday afternoon at the NDCC Arena. “That was a pretty good present right there,” a beaming Sahara said from outside the boisterous Grand Forks dressing room.Sahara, with only eight goals on the season but none bigger than Sunday’s winner, grabbed a loose puck in the neutral zone. The Kaledan, B.C. native skated down the left side of the ice before swooping in front of Nelson goalie Marcus Beesley.Sahara out waited Beesley before lifting a backhander into bottom left corner of the net.“I just saw the puck . . . the clock didn’t really matter,” explained Sahara. “I just had to go to the net. I was just glad I got it past him in time.”The loss was a bitter pill to swallow for the Leafs. The defending Murdoch Division champs are desperately trying to prove to the rest of the league this franchise can be included in the same sentence as the elite teams in the KIJHL.However, for the second time this season the Leafs have been beaten by one of the weaker sisters.“We kind of threw this one away,” said Leaf assistant coach Sean Dooley, who along with assistant Jason Rushton were trying to give head coach Chris Shaw an early Christmas present.Shaw was suspended for the Grand Forks game after a line brawl broke out in the final minutes of Saturday’s 4-1 loss to Beaver Valley. The game featured four fights, which is an automatic game suspension for the head coach of both Beaver Valley and Nelson.“We thought we had a comfortable lead,” Dooley added. “We thought that was good enough but at the end of the game we basically threw it away.”The Leafs had a comfortable lead. Gavin Currie scored on the power play at the 12-minute mark of the third period to give Nelson a 5-2 advantage.But no sooner than the Leafs had done the customary high five by the bench then Sahara scored his first of two on the night to make it a two-goal game.Twenty-one seconds later Zachary Thompson beat Beesley to make it a one-goal contest. With Nelson attempting to run out the clock Randy Tosoff scored the tying marker, tucking home a loose puck past Beesley.“We started going right after (Thompson’s) goal,” Sahara said. “We took the momentum and were able to get right back into the game with it.”In the overtime both teams had chances to end the contest. Leaf defenceman Tyler Parfeniuk skated around the Bruins’ defence but was denied by goalie Garrett Muir.  Muir replaced Ryan Ryman who left the game in the third with a leg injury.Beesley was also busy as the Leafs pressed for the winner leaving the backstopper the last man standing on too many occasions.“Grand Forks doesn’t have that bad a team,” Dooley confessed. “They’ve got a few good players on that team. We get up those goals and think the game is won but before you know it (Grand Forks) is right back in it.”Currie, as he’s done all season, led the Leaf charge offensively with two goals. Evan J. Moir, Marcus Dahl and rookie Adam Wheeldon scored singles.Kale Erickson and Yan Kalashnikov also scored for the Bruins. Nelson out shot Grand Forks 38-33.The Leafs are idle for a few weeks before returning to action December 29th in Castlegar against the Rebels. Nelson hosts Spokane Braves for the annual New Year’s Eve contest at 1 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.BLUELINES: Nelson was missing defenceman Blake Arcuri and forwards Cody Abbey and Colton Malmsten to suspension after the line brawl Saturday night in Beaver Valley. . . . Also on the sidelines due to injury was defencemen Walker Sidoni and Raymond Reimer and forward Connor McLaughlin. The news is not good for McLaughlin who could be gone for the rest of the season with a shoulder injury. . . .The turning point for Nelson may have come in the third when captain Taylor O’Neil dropped the gloves with Cody Larsen of the Bruins. Because when the roof began to cave in on Nelson there was no one there to hold it up, including the team captain. . . .After being held off the scoresheet last week in Osoyoos, Leafs leading scorer Gavin Currie has quietly put together a three-game point streak. The Abbotsford native has points in 15 of the last 19 games. . . .So what would have happened in second, three-on-three, overtime has their been a penalty called by referee Erik Laughton? The veteran referee said an extra player would have been added to the team with the man advantage making the power play a 4-on-3. . . .Nelson defeated Kimberley 6-4 Friday in the Bavarian City to open the weekend. Saturday, the Leaf fell 4-1 to the Hawks in Fruitvale. . . .Grand Forks, losing to Beaver Valley 7-4 Saturday, plays in Fruitvale Tuesday and Creston Friday before heading into the Christmas break.last_img read more

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