Over 1,900 signed up for Women’s March-Fort Worth Saturday afternoon

first_imgOffice of Religious and Spiritual Life affirms Muslim students in light of online threats The Leap: 10 April Fool’s pranks to try this year World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Twitter Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Lead On committee co-chairs share goals with students ‘The Big Switch:’ Student spends a day in the chancellor’s shoes Twitter Shane Battis Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ printOrganizers of the Women’s March-Fort Worth are expecting about 1,900 people to join Saturday afternoon’s march through downtown.Marchers will meet in front of the Tarrant County Courthouse. The group will start on Main Street, left on 3rd Street to Commerce Street, right on 4th Street to Main Street, turn right on 9th Avenue in front of the Fort Worth Convention Center, and circle back to the courthouse on Houston Street. The march is expected to start at 12:30 p.m. and continue until about 3:00 p.m..According to actionnetwork.org, the march is meant to show solidarity with those demonstrating in Saturday’s march in Washington D.C.  Brienn Richter, an assistant organizer, said the mission of both events is to give women a voice to express their views on issues.Marches are organized in Dallas, Austin, Houston, Denton as well as in cities all over the U.S..A statement on the event page reads in part: “The Women’s March will send a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world, that women’s rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.”Richter said, “We’re not marching against something. We’re marching for what we are for.”Erin Blythe, another organizer, said people will be advocating for various issues like planned parenthood, Obamacare, LGBTQ rights and the inauguration.“I voted and didn’t feel heard,” Blythe said. “I called my legislators and didn’t feel heard. Now I’m marching with other women who don’t feel heard. I feel invisible. By marching we will be visible and physically present.”Event organizers publicizing the event on actionnetwork.org and Facebook have stressed that the march is non-partisan and does not condone any acts of physical or verbal aggression.The event page invites anyone to join. Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Linkedin Facebook Facebook Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Linkedin ReddIt + posts Previous articleOver 1,900 signed up for Women’s March-Fort Worth Saturday afternoonNext articleTCU Football Recruiting Update Shane Battis RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Progressives Should Be Pleased By What Bernie Sanders Has Done So Far

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By David SprintzenGiven the completely unpredictable nature of the current political campaign, it is probably somewhat of a fool’s errand to offer the following comments, but I’ll offer them nonetheless. U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ losing four of five Eastern primaries on Tuesday makes it almost certain that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic presidential candidate.Having said that, from the perspective of one who shares practically all of the views expressed by Sen. Sanders (I-VT)—and thus, obviously, would love to see him elected president—I believe his total results are the best that progressives like myself could hope for. Let me briefly suggest why, knowing that there is much more that needs to be said on these matters.I sincerely doubt that Sanders could have been elected. I know that polls say differently, but I think they completely fail to take into consideration the kind of withering attack that he would face not only from Republicans, but from the mega-rich and the media, both from the mainstream and from the radical right of Talk Radio.Sanders’ campaign has laid the groundwork for the mobilization of the kind of revolution that he has called for. That is not something that can be done overnight, but will take time and expanded organizing. He has given public “mainstream” political legitimacy to the ideas of Occupy Wall Street—which they were incapable, and even uninterested, in doing. And he has mobilized vast numbers of previously “silent” citizens—particularly Millenials—who can now, hopefully, be brought into the continuing national progressive network of organizations such as MoveOn, US Action, National People’s Action, the Alliance for a Just Society, Citizen Action, the Working Families Party, Planned Parenthood, the Sierra Club, etc. These groups offer the opportunity to move the Democratic Party—and the country—in a far more progressive direction.Sanders’ campaign has already moved the Democratic Party, and its presumptive nominee, to the left. Clearly, one cannot expect Clinton to stay there without sustained pressure from this newly mobilized left—given her history and the Obama administration’s neo-liberal policies—but the groundwork and mobilization to do that is now possible.Donald Trump’s garnering the Republican nomination offers both probably the weakest possible opponent to a Democratic victory, and one whom I believe is surprisingly less dangerous than would be a U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), or Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) as a nominee. No doubt that last remark calls for an explanation that I cannot provide here. Simply let me assert that, terrible as Trump obviously is, he is less beholden to and captured by the full neo-liberal program of the Republican Establishment than they are.Thus, the election of New York’s former Democratic U.S. Senator is the more likely scenario. And, with all Clinton’s liabilities (see below), she will be presenting a reasonable corporate liberal agenda, including probably a few new U.S. Supreme Court justices. And hopefully, contributing to the election of a Democratic Senate with an enhanced progressive majority, plus a reasonable increase in Democratic representation in the House.But the major work will still be to build the national progressive movement state-by-state, while maintaining pressure on a Clinton administration. And if the Republican convention degenerates into a political brawl, so much the better for discrediting the radical right, and weakening its hold on what was once actually a conservative party.Having said all this, progressives, whatever their proclivities, will have to actively support Clinton’s campaign, whatever their misgivings, while building on Sanders’ momentum. This is certainly not the best of all worlds, but it’s the one we live in, and we must make our choices as effective as possible. There will be only two significant alternatives before us, and no outcome is foreordained, especially in a country in which either party begins any national election probably with more than 40 percent of the electorate committed in advance to vote for their candidate. And the possible election of a Republican is not something to take lightly.As for the politics of Clinton and President Barack Obama, let me share my personal abridgment of insightful comments by former White House counselor to President Bill Clinton and a two-time Democratic nominee for governor of Connecticut, Bill Curry, in his widely shared March 9 Salon piece “It should be over for Hillary: Party elites and MSNBC can’t prop her up after Bernie’s Michigan miracle,” which he offered immediately after Sanders’ remarkable victory in Michigan. I excerpt them with extensive personal modifications for which he is in no way responsible:“The fault lines of the new politics are not cultural issues like guns, abortion and same-sex marriage that divide the Democratic and Republican bases. They are issues of political reform and economic justice that divide both parties’ elites from both parties’ bases, and the American people from their government. On these issues we find the elites of both parties shockingly alike. Among them: global trade; financial deregulation and non-prosecution of financial crimes; (attacks on) the social safety net including Social Security, Medicare, a living wage and health care for all; above all, (being quite comfortable with) the ‘soft corruption’ of pay-to-play politics.“There’s a name for the bipartisan consensus of party elites: neo-liberalism. It is an inconvenient name for many reasons, but mostly because it seems odd that the worldview of the Republican elite would be an ideology with the root word ‘liberal’ in its name but it is true, nonetheless. And may even shed a little light on the open, bitter breach between GOP elites and the party base. Democrats stayed loyal longer to their elites for two reasons. One is their love of two very talented politicians, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, whose charm and verbal dexterity masked deep differences with the base. The other is their fear of Republicans.“I often talk to Democrats who don’t know Obama chose not to raise the minimum wage as president even though he had the votes for it; that he was willing to cut Medicare and Social Security and chose not to prosecute Wall Street crimes or pursue ethics reforms in government. They don’t know he dropped the public option or the aid he promised homeowners victimized by mortgage lenders. They don’t know and don’t want to know. Their affection for Bill and Barack—and their fear of Republicans—run too deep.“Hillary Clinton has neither their deft personal touch nor protean verbal skills. …Voters sense she’s just moving pawns on a chess board in part because she can never explain her change of heart and often doesn’t even try. She switched horses on global trade in a blog post, on the Keystone pipeline at a grammar school event. In a recent debate she left fracking to the GOP governors who covered themselves in glory on Obamacare, as if it were a states’ rights issue. With her Super PAC (and hers and Bill’s breathtaking haul of $153 million in mostly corporate speaking fees), she is the living avatar of pay-to-play politics.“She remains woefully out of touch with the public mood in other ways.… Clinton has been helped in her quest by her party, by big business, and by top-down endorsements from progressive lobbies many of which broke members’ hearts to deliver them. But no one’s helped her more than the media. I know full well this hasn’t always been true for the Clintons and I also know not all the help is intentional. But the media helps her, primarily by promoting the ‘conventional neo-liberal economic wisdom’ that both she and they share.”[Read Curry’s complete Salon commentary HERE]Let me conclude with a few brief comments on neo-liberalism.Neo-liberalism is clearly a set of policies essentially promoted by the corporate sector, particularly those involved with financial services. It constitutes a systematic attack on the positive role of government in regulating, coordinating and directing economic activity, while seeking to redress the tendency of unregulated capitalism to create vast economic and political inequalities. It promotes unbridled free market capitalism, prioritizing the consumer over the citizen, thus undermining democratic self-government and the collective well being of the people. Its inevitable result, as should finally be quite evident, is extraordinary wealth for the few, and increasing impoverishment for the rest. It must be exposed for what it is, and ultimately defeated.David Sprintzen is professor emeritus of philosophy at Long Island University and founder and former co-chair of the Long Island Progressive Coalition, where he continues to serve as a member of the board of directors.last_img read more

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Baines surprised by Hall of Fame election _ many others, too

first_imgHarold Baines (AP Photo/File) LAS VEGAS (AP) — Harold Baines answered the phone and learned he was a Hall of Famer.“Very shocked,” he admitted.So were many others around the baseball world.In fact, in the hours after his selection by a Hall-picked panel was announced Sunday at the Mandalay Bay resort, a lot of conversations at the winter meetings started the exact same way: “Harold Baines?”No one doubted Baines was a top player — a six-time All-Star with 1,628 RBIs, 384 home runs and 2,866 hits.“I had a great career. I’m very proud of it,” he said.But a couple other numbers stood out, too. Baines never drew more than 6.1 percent in five elections by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, far from the 75 percent required. In the key WAR stat compiled by baseballreference.com, Baines’ lifetime total was tied for 545th.Yes, 545th.Behind the likes of Placido Polanco, Jim Sundberg and Rafael Furcal in wins above replacement, not to mention Gil Hodges, Dick Allen, Don Mattingly, John Olerud and dozens more.The vote by the Today’s Game Era Committee was sure to spark renewed cries of cronyism at Cooperstown. Especially because the 16-member panel appointed by the Hall board included longtime Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf.“I’m glad he was on that committee this year to help to get into the Hall of Fame,” Baines said.Baines spent nearly all of his first 10 seasons with the White Sox and currently serves as a team ambassador in their community relations department.“So happy for Harold. He’s a great player and a great human being,” Reinsdorf praised in a statement. “I am so honored that I was a member of the committee. He deserved to be in long ago. I am just so excited.”“Not only was Harold one of my favorite players to watch, but I have nothing but admiration for him as a player and as a human being,” he said.Tony La Russa, Baines’ first big league manager, also was on the panel that elected him.In the past, Phil Rizzuto and Bill Mazeroski were among the players who benefited from friendly faces on Veterans Committees to reach the Hall. That panel has been revamped over the years, and the Today’s Game Era group was created as part of changes in 2014.“The era committees were established as a sort of a court of appeals for an opportunity in the event that over time it was felt that maybe somebody slipped through the cracks,” Hall President Jeff Idelson said. “And in the case of someone who received 6 percent of the vote in the BBWAA election, the reason that may have happened could be for many, many reasons.”It took 12 votes for election by the panel — longtime reliever Lee Smith was unanimous, Baines got 12 and former outfielder and manager Lou Piniella fell just short with 11.George Steinbrenner, Orel Hershiser, Albert Belle, Joe Carter, Will Clark, Davey Johnson and Charlie Manuel all received fewer than five votes.Baines, now 59, had a smooth, consistent, left-handed stroke. But he never finished higher than ninth in an MVP vote, and never was among the top five AL hitters in the yearly batting race. His single-season high was 29 home runs at a time when lots of players hit more.As this vote approached, his name drew little-to-no buzz in debates over who might be selected.“I wasn’t expecting this day to come,” the career .289 hitter said.Baines became a designated hitter after knee trouble ended his days in the outfield, and DHs have struggled to gain backing from Hall voters.Baines joined Frank Thomas as the only players in the Hall who spent more than half his games as a DH.“Everything I hear or read is DH is really not part of the game, I guess. But I disagree. But maybe this will the open up the doors for some more DHs,” Baines said.Both closers and DHs could see the numbers increase again very shortly.Mariano Rivera is eligible for the first time and big-hitting DH Edgar Martinez will be back on the ballot when results of the next BBWAA election are announced Jan. 22.Induction ceremonies are scheduled for July 21 at Cooperstown, New York.Between now and then, there’s certain to be more discussion about who else should be in the Hall. Drug-tainted Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens are on the upcoming BBWAA ballot, influential players’ union head Marvin Miller has been denied seven times by various committees, and steroids user Mark McGwire wasn’t among Sunday’s candidates.___More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

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Whitecaps Youth Soccer Camp welcomes striker Erik Hurtado

first_imgThere’s been a bit of a blip in the Whitecaps Youth Soccer Camp after it was realized that Major League Soccer star Kendall Waston, who was to attend the camp in Nelson, is unable to make his way to the Heritage City.Waston is still recovering from injury and is remaining in Vancouver for rehab. However, in replace of Waston, players will be happy to hear is none nother than swift attacking player, Erik Hurtado.The fifth overall pick in the 2013 MLS SuperDraft for Vancouver is expected to be in Nelson Thursday to attend the Whitecaps Youth Soccer Camp.Prior to joining Whitecaps FC, Hurtado played college soccer with Santa Clara University and played for United Soccer League (USL) Premier Development League (PDL) side Portland Timbers U-23. Hurtado spent August through December 2015 on loan to Mjøndalen IF of Norway’s Eliteserien. In December 2016, Hurtado signed a contract extension through 2018 with options for 2019 and 2020.The Whitecaps host another camp July 18-20 for Goalkeepers and players’ Attacking Speed.As well, there are camps set for Cranbrook July 25-28, Prospects Camp; August 14-18, Skills Camp; and August 29-31, Attacking Speed and Goalkeeping; and Trail, August 8-11, Skills Camp.To register or more information contac Rhyse Harnden at [email protected] or 604.669.9283, ext 2218 or go online to register.last_img read more

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