Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging releases discussion draft

first_imgThe Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging has released a discussion draft of the executive summary of their upcoming report.The Task Force was convened in Fall 2016 by President Faust to consider a set of important and interrelated questions designed to advance Harvard on the path from diversity to belonging. Over the past year, the Task Force has worked to consider issues of inclusion and belonging on campus through meetings with a variety of community groups, outreach workshops, a day-long retreat, and an afternoon of engagement.The discussion draft outlines the core elements of their proposed strategy through a set of “Shared Standards for Inclusive Excellence” to guide decision-making at all levels of the University.With the release of the discussion draft, the Task Force is soliciting feedback and input from members of the Harvard community. Comments and suggestions can be submitted via the Solution Space through November 30.To learn more about the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging and read the draft executive summary, visit https://inclusionandbelongingtaskforce.harvard.edu/comment-discussion-draft.last_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers

first_imgPlainfield Township officials have approved zoning to protect their 1½-mile section of the Appalachian Trail. It will prevent projects like natural gas pipelines, wind turbines, solar panels, and cellphone towers from being located near the scenic footpath. The Truth About Recycling: Why Recycling has stopped in many places in the U.S. The global recycling system wasn’t ever perfectly eco-friendly. Recycling operators had been known to illegally burn or bury recycling waste, causing a ripple effect of pollution including contaminated water, killed crops, respiratory illnesses, and long-lasting negative impacts on the environment overall. What happens to the waste we think we’re recycling? For decades, many countries, including us, send plastic waste to China and Southeast Asia for recycling. But just last year, China and many other Asian countries, banned the import due to the overwhelming amount they already had, according to the Business Insider. This has tragically lead to burning and landfills in many of our major cities. center_img Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers The Morning Call reported that The Appalachian Trail Conservancy provided a $16,900 grant covering the cost of a consultant from the Bethlehem-based Urban Research and Development Corp. to draft an ordinance with the township. The ordinance includes guidelines for controlling light pollution, the withdraw of groundwater, digital signs, noise, commercial outdoor recreation, residential developments, solar panels, natural gas pipelines and wind turbines.last_img read more

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Royal Navy tests underwater gliders in North Atlantic

first_imgRoyal Navy is trialing underwater gliders in the North Atlantic, that can rapidly send vital information during submarine hunting operations. One of the Slocum Gliders is being tested in the seas west of Scotland during a five-month deployment. The data is being integrated into ocean forecast models by the Met Office and is available for use by the Navy at the Joint Operational Meteorology and Oceanography Centre at Northwood. The intention is for the navy to eventually deploy gliders continually to high-threat areas to give a clear and constant picture of the underwater battlespace, meaning operational decisions will be based on the very latest information. During these latest tests, the project has been able to look at reducing power consumption of on-board sensors to extend battery life and resolve teething issues of getting data from the shore-side receivers to the Met Office. The way sound travels through water is greatly affected by the water temperature, pressure and salinity, which impacts the effectiveness of sonar and sensors used by ships and aircraft to track submarines. “Ocean environments are changing – what we knew 20 or 30 years ago doesn’t apply now in many areas, particularly the North Atlantic which is our backyard for submarine operations and probably one of the most complicated and challenging bodies of ocean,” said Captain Pat Mowatt RN. The Slocum was due to stay out for four weeks but has been extended to up to five months, giving the project the opportunity to test the glider to its limits on a long duration mission for the first time. These trials are supported by the National Oceanographic Centre, British Oceanographic Data Centre and the Scottish Association of Marine Science. Having this data quickly means sub-hunters will be able to adapt better when they are attempting to detect underwater surface threats. The gliders can provide up-to-date information on these matters quickly to TAC HM (tactical hydrography, meteorology and oceanography) trained officers who can then advise submarine hunting commanders about the range of the ship’s sonars and how to adjust settings for best results. The glider can dive down to 1,000 meters using controlled buoyancy to drive itself to the surface and back down, which ultimately means it can stay out at sea for months on end and constantly send data. Right now, the Royal Navy continues to trial these gliders as part of Project Hecla. One of them is currently off the North West coast of the Outer Hebrides. “Salinity, sound velocity and temperature have all changed. We need to know these accurately as we strive to understand more and more about the undersea environment (battlespace) and how this effects the performance of ship and submarine sensors so we can achieve an operational advantage.” Project Hecla was established to optimise the Navy’s ability to collect and exploit hydrographic and oceanographic information and they are continuing to look at other opportunities on top of the gliders. The unmanned Slocum is capable of sending near real-time information on temperature, depth, salinity (salt content), currents, oxygen levels, turbulence and more. A better understanding of water column properties can also reveal insight into how an adversary might exploit the environment to ‘hide’ in underwater features, such as ocean fronts and eddies. Project Hecla is also involved in maintaining safety of navigation for all ships using autonomous vehicles. The project will also trial how autonomous vehicles can aid data collection and exploitation missions alongside NavyX, who are responsible for developing and testing new technology for potential use on the frontlines. These parameters can impact the efficiency of the sonar and sensors used by the Type 23 frigates and Merlin and Wildcat helicopters – as well as the Royal Air Force’s P-8 Poseidon – during submarine hunting operations. Data from trials of the REMUS autonomous underwater vehicles is used to produce Admiralty Charts for maritime navigation systems.last_img read more

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