Role models for HR

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Weall look for them – individuals we can model ourselves on, who can give usconfidence, set us on the right career path, lead by example and spur us on tohigh achievement, writes Scott Beagrie. Theycome in all shapes and sizes and from all walks of life, and age notwithstanding, our role models are just as likely to be Richard Branson orMartha Lane Fox as Jamie Oliver or David Beckham. Very often, however, the mostinspirational role models are the people we work with. PersonnelToday quizzed six HR directors – including our guest editor – all of whom havehad a major impact within their organisations, about their role models, andwhere they gained their inspiration. You may be surprised at some of theirresponses.KarenSimpsonDirector of HR and culture at telecommunications consultancy Mason, on herCEO, Terry FlanaganSimpsonjoined Mason as office manager, which included responsibility for HR and allsupport functions and, as the company grew, focused on HR. She was promoted tothe board in 2001.Simpsonbelieves Flanagan, a former Oldham and Great Britain rugby league forward, isan ideal role model, because of his willingness to share the benefits of hisexperience. She is also inspired by what he has achieved.Oneof the key things she feels she has learned from him is how to enable people toreach their full potential by motivating and stretching them.VanceKearneyVice-president of HR EMEA at Oracle, on US playwright, Arthur MillerWhenhe was a young personnel manager, Kearney found the works of Arthur Millerparticularly inspirational, and believes they should be mandatory reading forthe HR profession. The Crucible, in particular, is a “marvellous piece ofdrama” that goes to the heart of a “really important matter” forHR, which is that evil only triumphs because good people fail to act.”Badthings happen because good, honest, decent people fail to act and don’t speakout because they perceive [someone] to be more powerful or influential thanthem. So it’s quite a good lesson in bravery for HR,” he says. “HRmust be prepared to be unpopular with senior management at times, and to pointout [for instance] that it isn’t appropriate for the boss to receive a £1mbonus when the employees are on the minimum wage.”FrancesWrightGroup HR director of SHL, on her first boss Tony Ryan, manager ofmanagement development at IBMWrightsays she didn’t have one particular role model, but cites Ryan as an influence.First and most importantly, he told her that work was to be enjoyed, and thatit should be fun. The other key thing that has stayed with me is [the need for]integrity, and in HR you certainly have to do what is right and seek the mostappropriate solution,” she says. “I have always tried to follow thatwith my team and when trying to build a team.”Sheadds: “I think you can learn from people, but in HR, I don’t believe youshould model you own behaviour or try and emulate someone else, because yourstyle needs to be linked to the business and its culture.”VickyWilliamsHR director of the All Leisure division of the Compass Group, on CathySmith, global HR director of the US support services division of CompassSmithwas the HR director of the unit she joined as an HR manager 14 years ago. OnWilliams’ second day, Smith offered her a piece of sound advice: if she gotherself known by everybody within her first year, she would have a good futurewithin the organisation. Williams says her career has since followed a similartrajectory to Smith’s, who has been promoted seven times.”Smithgave accountability to her people. She allowed them to take responsibility fordecisions, and believed there was never a wrong or right, just differentoptions.”BeverleyShearsHR director, South West Trains, on Madonna and John Cope, chiefindustrial relations officer at London UndergroundShearssays one of her role models is Madonna. “I think business could learn alot from her,” she says. “She is a successful product, anticipatingtrends and moving before the trend, so she is always adapting to keep in thelimelight and to be different. As an organisation, she has had a makeover everytwo to three years and has been successful in terms of flexibility,adaptability, innovation and performance.”Shearsalso admires Madonna’s personality, and “her sheer grit and determinationto succeed”.Interms of work role models, Shears says that they tend to be extremely seniorand experienced people who are confident enough in their own ability andexperience to mentor people who are much more junior to them and just startingout. This is what happened to Shears herself, citing John Cope, chiefindustrial relations officer at London Underground, as her role model. “Iwas his PA. His immortal words to me were: ‘Young lady, if you persist intelling me what to do, I must insist you are qualified, and we will fund it’.That started me on the route to becoming professionally qualified.”AngieRisleyGroup HR director of Whitbread, on professor Michael Beer, who she firstmet seven years ago, and Dave Ulrich, who she heard give a talk eight years agoRisleyhas chosen two individuals who have had an influence on her rather than who sheconsiders to be role models. Michael Beer, honorary professor at HarvardBusiness School, has worked with Risley and the top team at Whitbread, and hada “very significant impact” on her career. “Whathe has given me is a very good understanding of how to achieve a highperformance, high commitment organisation,” she says. “Basically, hisphilosophy is that you can’t achieve that unless you have an organisation thathas honest conversations. And that you are able to identify and discuss thebarriers to your goals and knock them down.””DaveUlrich was really able to articulate the role of the HR professional. Not justin terms of making sure that all the decisions have a people angle to them, butactually being able to influence the overall decision and the scope ofit,” she says. “It was very significant in my learning at that time.And I think it’s still very relevant for HR today.”BeverleyShears guest editorWhy I chose this topic‘Ihave been really lucky to have worked with people who encouraged me to do morethan I thought I was capable of. My message to all directors is that you owe itto your organisation to do the same for your up-and-coming people. They willreflect well on you, and are not a threat.’ Role models for HROn 15 Jun 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Official: Inmate transfer caused health disaster at prison

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A report by California’s inspector general says misguided attempts to protect inmates from the coronavirus at one prison “caused a public health disaster” at another. Outdated tests failed to detect that some of the transferred inmates were already infected, and two of them later died. Corrections officials reiterated Monday that they had the best intentions. The report says the transfer of those inmates from the California Institution for Men east of Los Angeles to San Quentin State Prison north of San Francisco at the end of May led to the deaths of 28 inmates and a correctional officer there, while infecting 75% of inmates.last_img

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Gov. Wolf Announces $121 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 20 Counties

first_img January 30, 2019 Gov. Wolf Announces $121 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 20 Counties SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Environment,  Infrastructure,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the investment of $121 million for 25 drinking water, wastewater and non-point source projects across 20 counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST).“Clean water is the keystone for strong, vibrant communities,” said Governor Wolf. “The approvals announced today show our continued commitment to investments in clean water for Pennsylvania by supporting our citizens and strengthening our communities.”The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, Growing Greener, Marcellus Legacy funds, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for these projects are disbursed after expenses for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST for review.“These projects benefit public health, the environment, and support sustainable communities as we advance our shared goal of clean water, safe environment and prosperous communities for our families to enjoy, both now and for future generations,” said Governor Wolf.A list of project summaries follows:Drinking Water ProjectsBradford County Towanda Municipal Authority*- received a $4,736,700 loan to develop three new well sources, a one million gallon per day membrane filtration plant, 107,000-gallon storage tank, 7,500 feet of raw water transmission main, a booster pump station rehabilitation, 6,780 transmission main replacement and related appurtenances. The project will address a 47 percent water loss, increase reliability, provide for adequate fire protection, and secure the raw water supply.Butler CountySlippery Rock Municipal Authority*- received a $1,622,500 loan to install approximately 5,500 feet of waterline and associated appurtenances. The project will address unaccounted for water loss and improve service reliability. This line replacement project is being coordinated with a PennDOT paving project.Crawford County Meadville Area Water Authority*- received a $3,000,000 loan to replace approximately 5,885 feet of water lines, install new service connections, and 46 new system valves, 12 fire hydrants are to be replaced or updated. The project will provide operational efficiencies, reduce high unaccounted-for water loss, increase service reliability and support economic development opportunities in the area.Indiana County Clymer Borough Municipal Authority*- received a $1,067,768 loan and a 1,109,732 grant to install a forced draft aerator to remove hydrogen sulfide prior to filtration; replace a storage tank and above ground clearwell, 7,750 feet of leaking waterline and fire hydrants. The project will reduce unaccounted for water loss, improve service reliability, reduce issues with taste and odor and remove exposure to potential drinking water contamination.Schuylkill CountyHazelton City Authority*- received a $1,519,841 loan to rehabilitate a number of drinking water storage tanks, install security measures and replacement of worn tank components. The project will improve reliability of service, emergency back-up power and reduce long-term maintenance costs.Sullivan CountyLaporte Borough – received a $394,775 loan to install individual meters and meter pits. The project will allow better system operations, detect leaks and determine true unaccounted-for water loss.Wastewater ProjectsAllegheny CountyElizabeth Borough Municipal Authority**- received an $8,800,000 loan to install a new pump station with additional wet well and channel capacity to accommodate wet weather flows. The project will reduce wet weather overflows in the Monongahela River reducing impact on downstream drinking water supplies.Beaver CountyRochester Area Joint Sewer Authority**- received a $35,407,759 loan and a $1,592,241 grant to construct sewage treatment plant, Center Street, West Madison and Freedom pump station upgrades and add a detention tank to eliminate wet weather overflows.Butler County Allegheny Clarion Valley Development Corporation **- received a $920,570 loan to construct a 42,000 gallon per day sewage lift station and a 22,500 gallon per day extended aeration wastewater treatment train to augment the existing facilities to eliminate the overloading of the current facilities and provide for compliance with a Consent Order and Agreement with the Department of Environmental Protection.Slippery Rock Municipal Authority **- received a $1,622,500 loan to replace approximately 2,050 feet of sanitary sewer force main, 600 feet of gravity sewers and replace a belt filter press at the treatment plant. The project will eliminate combined sewer overflows due to force main breaks, plugged lines, addressing issues with untreated or partially treated sewerage discharges during wet weather events, and replace the belt filter press that is at the end of its useful life. The line work on this project is being coordinated with a PennDOT paving project.Cambria County City of Johnstown** – received a $4,535,490 loan and a grant of $6,364,510 to replace and rehabilitate approximately 30,000 feet of sanitary sewers and lateral lines in the Old Conemaugh and Hornerstown areas of the City of Johnstown. The project will reduce wet weather overflows of raw sewage into Stony Creek and Little Conemaugh River and help satisfy the Consent Order and Agreement with the Department of Environmental Protection.Clarion CountyKnox Township Municipal Authority**- received a $1,529,923 loan and a $1,604,077 grant to construct 10,100 feet of sanitary sewer main, 43 concrete manholes, house laterals, one grinder pump and a recirculating sand filter treatment facility. The project will eliminate malfunctioning on-lot systems, documented at 57 percent, and wildcat discharges in the service area affecting local drinking water wells contaminated with fecal coliform.Dauphin County Lower Paxton Township** – received a $13,278,195 loan to repair, rehabilitate, replace, and line approximately 41,200 feet of sanitary sewer mains, associated manholes, laterals as well as constructing sewers in four Beaver Creek mini-basins and sewer rehabilitation in two Spring Creek mini-basins for an additional 18,300 feet.Elk County Benezette Township – received a $249,660 loan and a $350,340 grant to construct an effluent metered manhole, flow-paced chemical feed pumps, air diffusers, two new sludge dewatering reed beds, and a pre-treatment facility. The project will address operational issues at the treatment plant and eliminate partially treated effluent from entering a tributary of Sinnemahoning Creek.Mercer CountyPerry Township – received a $2,221,956 loan and a $2,878,044 grant to construct 28,000 feet of pressure sewers, residential grinder pumps and a 46,000 gallon per day wastewater treatment plant to provide service to the Hadley and Camp Perry areas. The Clarks Mill area will receive 2,100 feet of gravity sewers to 14 customers and will be served by a community on-lot disposal system. The project will address failing on-lot systems and wildcat sewers in the proposed service areas. Almost 60 percent of the on-lot systems were determined to be malfunctioning, resulting in public health issues related to untreated sewage in publically accessible areas.Montgomery CountyFranconia Sewer Authority **- received a $4,608,000 loan to install 22,350 feed of pressure sewers in Morwood Village, 4,350 feet of pressure sewers along Allentown and Indian Creek Roads and 1,850 feet of gravity sewers along Rittenhouse Place and Indian Creek Road.Schuylkill CountyHegins Hubley Authority – received a $2,000,000 loan to pay for cost associated with design and engineering for collection and treatment facilities to serve areas of Hegins and Hubley Townships. Preliminary engineering indicates over 166,610 feet of gravity sewers, 21,564 of low-pressure sewers and seven pump stations will be needed for the collection system, as well as a 600,000 gallons per day wastewater treatment facility. The project will address a high failure rate of on-lot treatment systems discharging untreated sewage into publically accessible areas.Somerset CountyConfluence Borough Municipal Authority **- received a $5,310,615 loan and a $4,365,635 grant to replace the existing sewage conveyance system, and construct improvements to the sewage treatment facilities to eliminate combined sewer overflows into the Youghiogheny River, and comply with the Consent Order and Agreement with the Department of Environmental Protection.Washington CountyPeters Townshp Sanitary Authority*- received a loan of $4,700,000 to pay for realignment and upgrades to the Giant Oaks and Oakwood Road interceptors, replace the existing Shoreline Drive sewer conveyance system, construct a new pump station, and replace failed sewer lines in the Hidden Brook area. The project will reduce or eliminate wet weather discharges of untreated sewage discharges to Chartiers Creek tributary and complies with a corrective action plan approved by the Department of Environmental Protection.Westmoreland CountyDerry Township Municipal Authority – received a $1,828,060, loan to construct a new sewage collection system to serve residents in the Oasis and Lower Flowers Road areas and connect the Keystone State Park to the New Alexandria treatment plant. The project will address the health-related issues with malfunctioning on-lot systems.Storm Water ProjectsArmstrong County West Kittanning Borough – received a $470,000 loan to replace 1,440 feet of existing storm sewers along Pine Hill Road. The project will address the safety hazards associated with storm water flows causing sinkholes and roadway hazards.Dauphin CountyHalifax Borough – received a $821,789 loan and $1,153,202 grant to construct approximately 3,108 feet of storm sewers with 37 inlets and a rain garden to improve drainage and decrease area flooding.Delaware CountyProspect Park Borough – received a $909,592 loan and $111,688 grant to construct approximately 1,630 feet of new storm sewers, rehabilitation of approximately 138 feet of storm sewers, 18 inlets, eight manholes, and a rain garden. The project will alleviate flooding on private property, runoff into streams and replace undersized storm sewers.Non-point Source Water Quality Improvement ProjectsLancaster CountyChester County Conservation District – received a $695,838 loan to pay for a circular concrete manure storage facility, roofed stacking structure, barnyard and curbing with confinement fence, roofed heavy use area, gravel access road, roof cutters, downspouts, and reinforced gravel animal walkway on the Clair Good property. The project is expected to eliminate over 8,000 pounds of nitrogen, 3,529 pounds of phosphorus and 10,180 pounds of sediment from Cedar Creek a tributary to the Conestoga River, and Susquehanna River.Chester County Conservation District – received a $469,308 grant to cover the costs related to construction of manure storage facilities, heavy use areas, walkways and storm water controls on the Benuel Stoltzfus property. The project is expected to eliminate 6,612 pounds of nitrogen, 2,789 pounds of phosphorus and 5,660 pounds of sediment from entering the Little Conestoga Creek, a tributary to the Conestoga River and the Susquehanna River.* denotes projects that have Drinking Water State Revolving Funds** denotes projects that are funded with Clean Water State Revolving FundsFor more information, visit www.pennvest.pa.gov or call 717-783-6798.last_img read more

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