Transfer rumours and paper review – Tuesday, August 18

first_imgHere’s the top transfer-related stories in Tuesday’s newspapers…Manchester United chief executive Ed Woodward is in Barcelona to try and tie up the £22m transfer of Spanish international Pedro. Woodward flew to Catalunya ahead of Monday’s Spanish Super Cup second leg between Barcelona and Athletic Bilbao at the Nou Camp. (Daily Mail)Manchester City still hope to add Kevin de Bruyne to their squad this summer. De Bruyne stunned an audience at the SportBild Awards in Hamburg by saying he would ‘definitely’ be staying with Wolfsburg. But De Bruyne’s agent, Patrick De Koster, quickly insisted that was not the case and his player had been put in an ‘awkward’ situation. City now plan to press ahead with a £50m move. (Daily Mail)Manchester City have been offered Nicolas Otamendi by Valencia but will not be sending Eliaquim Mangala in the other direction. (Daily Express)Chelsea have responded to their defeat to Manchester City by tabling a new £30 million offer for John Stones. But Everton will turn down their latest offer and will demand £40m to part with the central defender. (Daily Telegraph)Newcastle have offered £12million for Marseille winger Florian Thauvin with Remy Cabella poised to go the other way on loan. (Daily Mail)Premier League clubs have been put on alert by news from France that Zlatan Ibrahimovic can leave PSG in this transfer window. Manchester United and Arsenal both need a striker and while Old Trafford powerbrokers appear reluctant to draw the enigmatic Swede to Old Trafford, they do need firepower. (Daily Mail)West Ham have joined the race to sign £15m-rated QPR striker Charlie Austin.  Austin is aware of West Ham’s interest and is prepared to join them. (London Evening Standard)But Newcastle United have ended their interest in Austin. Magpies boss Steve McClaren and his coach Steve Black were interested in bringing the striker to St James’ Park after working with him at Loftus Road while on the backroom team. But the long-running saga seems to have reached its conclusion after QPR warned clubs that they must pay the £15million fee for the 26-year-old. (Newcastle Chronicle)Sunderland will bid to re-sign Kieran Richardson from Aston Villa as they attempt to reverse their nightmare start to the Premier League season. (Daily Mirror)Norwich City are on the verge of a deal to sign Mattia Destro on loan from Roma, though Bologna are interested in the Italy forward. The 24-year-old scored 13 goals two seasons ago, leading to interest from Chelsea and Wolfsburg, but he joined AC Milan on loan last season. (The Times)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…It’s over! Manchester United target Sergio Ramos signs new long-term Real Madrid contractJuventus line up Erik Lamela deal after Tottenham tell them to forget about Christian Eriksen Former Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini wants to be reunited with Samir Nasri at Inter Milan ?Marseille want £12m for Florian Thauvin as Newcastle revive interest in wingerSouthampton transfer report: Ronald Koeman close to adding £8.5m defender to squad Besiktas joing chase for Liverpool outcast LucasAll over for Arsenal? Rafa Benitez details season targets for Real Madrid striker Karim BenzemaLiverpool ready Illarramendi bid after Real Madrid ‘agree deal’ for new midfielder Juventus hope to beat Arsenal with big money bid for long-term target Julian DraxlerReports – Chelsea sending scouts to watch Ghana teen star Godfred Donsah Kevin de Bruyne latest: Wolfsburg coach suggests Manchester City move is imminentManchester United transfer news: Pedro latest and Argentine international deal imminent Blow for Arsenal and Manchester United? Isco’s agent quashes speculation of Real Madrid star’s exitSergio Ramos rubbishes Man United links – ‘I never wanted to leave Real Madrid!’Done deal! Swansea sign teenage strikerlast_img read more

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Raiders mailbag: No Antonio Brown questions? I’ll answer anyway

first_imgNAPA — Back at it Thursday following the mandatory player’s day off. Was surprised there were no inquiries about Antonio Brown so I’ll start there and then get into the questions.Perhaps it’s because there are so many sides to the Raiders’ biggest acquisition people don’t know where to start.Here’s the deal so far. Brown looked great in the handful of one-on-one drills he participated in Tuesday, and at this point there’s no reason to believe there is anything longterm going on with regard …last_img

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Eastern Cape’s truck making boom

first_img10 June 2008Passenger cars may be the big brother of the Eastern Cape automotive manufacturing industry, but behind the scenes a bustling heavy-duty truck and bus sector is poised to take its first big strides.The growing economy and a construction boom are only two of the driving forces pulling the commercial vehicles section out of its infancy and onto its own legs – in fact, a wrap of South Africa’s vehicle sales figures for 2007 show that commercial vehicles sales have continued to grow, while passenger vehicle sales have slumped. This is good news for Port Elizabeth-based General Motors (GMSA) and Volkswagen (VWSA) and Mercedes-Benz (MBSA) in East London, where the province’s hard-working commercial vehicles are assembled.Four decades of truck-buildingThe Eastern Cape’s oldest truck maker, Mercedes-Benz, for instance, achieved a record year, with its commercial vehicle divisions selling 8 622 units in 2007, representing an overall market share of 23.3%.All the truck models built at the German car giant’s East London plant, including the Mercedes-Benz Axor, Freightliner and Mitsubishi FUSO ranges, are reserved for the South African market.Mercedes-Benz spokesperson Shirle Greig says they have been assembling trucks in East London since 1962, although the company’s name has changed over the years, from Car Distributors Assembly to United Car and Diesel Distributors to Mercedes-Benz SA, and most recently to DaimlerChrysler SA.In March 2002, Ikhwezi TruckTech took over the assembly of Mercedes-Benz’s trucks.The first Mercedes-Benz truck built in South Africa in 1962 was the LP911, the first model in the enormously popular L-series, with its rounded lines and distinctive snub-nose.“The LP911 had a nine-ton gross vehicle mass (GVM) with a 4.5 tonne payload, a 110 horse-power indirect injection diesel engine and at the time it was revolutionary,” says Greig. “In those days, the Mercedes-Benz truck had one of the smallest slices of the commercial vehicle market share pie, and was seen more in farmyards than in cities.”‘Hard-working’ light commercial vehiclesThe truck industry in Port Elizabeth is somewhat younger than the four decade-old Mercedes-Benz, but already General Motors SA’s hard-working light commercial vehicle lines, like the Isuzu KB and the Corsa Utility bakkies, make up most of its output.GMSA spokesperson Denise van Huyssteen says that 74.6% of the vehicles produced by GMSA last year were light commercial vehicles while only 25.4% were passenger vehicles.The company was indeed hard-working in 2007 and acquired a 23% share of the light commercial vehicle market in South Africa – this after they re-entered the market over the past five years.“We launched the new Isuzu KB towards the end of 2007, and expect that in 2008 our sales of this popular car line will increase,” says Van Huyssteen.Overall their medium and heavy commercial vehicles controlled 8.4% of the South African market share in 2007.“We will be looking to grow this share in 2008. The trucks which we supply to this segment of the market are through our 50/50 joint venture company with Isuzu, called Isuzu Truck South Africa,” she says. “We import limited numbers of light commercial vehicles and these include the Lumina Utility and the Opel Vivaro.”The coming year spells more hard work, and GMSA will be launching six new passenger vehicles in South Africa as well as four commercial vehicles.Mzantsi Truck and BusUitenhage-based Volkswagen South Africa’s Mzantsi Truck and Bus manufacturer started operating in January 2006 at the VWSA commercial vehicles plant.Mzantsi is responsible for vehicle assembly, maintenance and warehouse management, while Volkswagen is responsible for quality assurance, logistics and information systems, product and process engineering and overseeing that Mzantsi performs to VW’s international standards.Mzantsi has to date employed more than 20 new recruits, mainly from an automotive school of excellence, the Uitenhage-Despatch Development Initiative training centre, a school of excellence that is a public-private partnership promoting economic activity in the two Eastern Cape towns.Mzantsi director and full-time production manager Vusikaya Mancapa finds his job challenging and exciting, saying the first 20 months proved to be a “quantum learning curve”.“The name Mzantsi came up spontaneously and soon gained popularity within the group. It is an authentic Nguni name for the South, which has acquired a street-wise connotation that refers to South Africa,” Mancapa says. “Since it was the first time that Volkswagen was building trucks and buses in Southern Africa, we found the name most appropriate for this exciting venture.”Responding to a question about the lucrativeness of their business, Mancapa said, “The expected return on our investment in Mzantsi is not lucrative in the short-to-medium term. Our hopes – as well as our profit plans – are pinned on sustained business growth in the medium to long term.”Three bus and five truck model ranges are currently assembled at the Mzantsi plant. In its first year (2006), the company built 122 buses and no trucks, but by last year 213 new Constellation trucks were assembled and 46 buses were built.Mzantsi Truck and Bus spokesperson Banoyolo Hlalukana says that while the manufacturing facility has remained the same in 2008, more units will be produced – approximately 600 units in total – a clear indication that their hard work to date is being rewarded by growth.This article was first published in Eastern Cape Madiba Action, winter 2008 edition. Republished here with kind permission.last_img read more

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Radio in South Africa

first_imgRadio services are broadcast in all 11 official languages, as well as in German, Hindi, Portuguese and the San Bushmanlanguages of !Xu and Khwe. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library)Cheap, portable and requiring no literacy, radio has long been the most accessed form of media in South Africa, reaching beyond urban centres deep into the poorest and most remote rural areas. There is one radio set for every five South Africans: an estimated 10 million radios (and listeners many times that number) in a population of some 48 million.Programming is dominated by music – contemporary, traditional, gospel and classic – but includes phone-in talk and current affairs, as well as local news and information broadcast on the country’s community stations.All 11 of South Africa’s official languages get airtime, as well as German, Hindi, Portuguese and the San Bushman languages of !Xu and Khwe.South African radio falls into three broad categories:public service radio broadcast by the state-owned South African Broadcasting Corporationcommercial radiocommunity radioRadio is available on the airwaves, via satellite and on the internet. Live audio streaming from most stations is provided by AntRadio.Regulating the industrySouth African broadcasting is regulated by the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa). Icasa’s mandate is to:issue broadcast licencesensure universal service and accessmonitor the industry and enforce compliance with rules, regulations and policieshear disputes brought by industry or members of the public against licenseesplan, control and manage the frequency spectrumprotect consumers from unfair business practicesIcasa websiteThe National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) is a non-profit grouping of organisations and individuals working in broadcasting and related industries. NAB helps the industry regulate and promote itself, grounded in the principles of democracy, diversity and freedom of expression.National Association of Broadcasters websiteThe Broadcasting Complaints Commission (BCCSA), set up by NAB in 1993, adjudicates and mediates complaints against any broadcaster who has signed its code of conduct.The BCCSA is entirely independent of NAB and broadcasters, with commissioners appointed by an independent panel, chaired by a retired judge of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court.Broadcasting Complaints Commission websitePublic service radioThe country’s public service broadcaster is the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC). While wholly owned by the state, the corporation is financially independent of taxpayers’ money, deriving its income from advertising and licence fees in a ratio of four to one.The SABC’s mandate is to provide both a commercial and public service, each administered separately, with commercial radio stations subsidising the public service stations. The corporation’s commercial stations include 5FM, a national youth music station, Metro FM, a music station targeting black urban youth, and Channel Africa, which broadcasts across the continent in a number of languages.The corporation’s public broadcasting arm includes cultural services in all 11 official languages, as well as stations for South Africa’s Indian (Lotus FM) and San (X-K FM) communities. By far the largest radio station in South Africa is Ukhozi FM, the SABC’s isiZulu cultural service, with 6.38-million listeners a week.SABC websiteCommercial radioIn the apartheid era South Africa had only two independent radio stations: Radio 702 and Capital Radio. With the deregulation and liberalisation of broadcasting in the late 1990s, the number of commercial stations operating outside of SABC control proliferated.In 1996 six lucrative SABC stations were privatised: Gauteng’s Highveld Stereo and Radio Jacaranda, KwaZulu-Natal’s East Coast Radio, the Western Cape’s KFM, the Eastern Cape’s Radio Algoa and the Free State’s OFM. The government raised over R500-million as the stations were licensed to various black-controlled groups.In early 1997 eight new commercial radio licences were granted for broadcasting in South Africa’s three biggest cities – Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.Applicants targeting black audiences with new formats were generally favoured, with two “smooth jazz” licences, Heart 104.9 in Cape Town and Igagasi 99.5 in Durban; one urban youth station, YFM; and one urban contemporary station, Kaya FM. The remaining four licences went to an English-language talk station, Cape Talk; two Afrikaans talk stations, Punt in Cape Town and Durban; and a classical music station, Classic FM.Community radioFrom 1992 onwards, Icasa processed hundreds of community radio licence applications from groups as diverse as rural women’s cooperatives, Afrikaans communities and religious bodies.South Africa now has over 200 community stations, broadcast in many different languages. Their scope and reach varies enormously – from the half-a-million Johannesburg residents who tune in to Jozi FM to the thousand or so people who listen to Ilitha Community Radio in the Eastern Cape town of Maclear.Community radio struggles to access financing in the form of advertising, so it is dependent on local and international donor agencies and the government for its finance. This has a certain impact on its impartiality and independence.Nonetheless, community radio remains important for entrenching democracy at local level, as well as helping spread education and community spirit. It is a crucial part of the South African broadcasting landscape, providing diversity for listeners and much-needed skills for the commercial radio sector.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]bsouthafrica.com.Related articlesThe media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineSouth African televisionSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationsUseful linksAnt RadioBroadcasting Complaints Commission of South AfricaDepartment of CommunicationsFreedom of Expression InstituteIndyMedia South AfricaInstitute for the Advancement of JournalismJournalism.co.zaMedia Development and Diversity AgencyMedia Institute of Southern AfricaNational Association of BroadcastersNational Community Radio ForumPrimediaSouth African Advertising Research FoundationSouth African Broadcasting CorporationSouth African National Editors Forumlast_img read more

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New govt ‘for all South Africans’: Zuma

first_img28 April 2009 President-elect Jacob Zuma has assured the country that his new administration would be a government for all South Africans. “Working together we will make it a government for all South Africans,” Zuma told journalists after the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) announced the results of South Africa’s general elections in Pretoria on Saturday night. Zuma, who will be inaugurated as President on 9 May, said South Africa needed a government that knew what to do in order to tackle poverty and build on the successes of the 15 years since the country’s first democratic elections in 1994. “We were serious when we said we want government to have direct contact with the people of South Africa,” he said, vowing to improve service delivery while ensuring that only competent people were employed in the public service. Zuma congratulated the IEC on delivering another efficient, free and fair election. The African National Congress (ANC) received 65.9% of the 17.6-million valid votes cast, securing 264 seats in South Africa’s National Assembly, followed by the Democratic Alliance (DA) with 16.6% of the vote (67 seats in Parliament) and the recently established Congress of the People (Cope) with 7.4% (30 seats). Regarding the 2010 Fifa World Cup, the President-in-waiting said the government would ensure that South Africa hosted the best ever tournament. He said he had spoken to Fifa President Sepp Blatter earlier on Saturday afternoon to assure him that the new administration pick up from the current administration in its preparations for the event. “We are convinced that we will make a success of the tournament and that we will impress the world with our abilities as a host for an event of this magnitude,” he said. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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“Water coming down, Cacher climbing up” GCQYK6 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – 8/16/2010

first_img SharePrint RelatedNear the top of Europe (GC2BVRY) – Geocache of the WeekJuly 16, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”A little adrenaline never hurt anyone — Klettersteig Schweifinen (GC2FX7P) — Geocache of the WeekAugust 27, 2014In “Community”Don’t look down! — Vertical Limit I: Die Brücke (GCZVW2) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 5, 2014In “Community” “Water coming down, Cacher climbing up” GCQYK6“Water coming down, Cacher climbing up” (GCQYK6) might define a terrain 5 geocache. Terrain is rated from 1 (most accessible) to 5 (most difficult).  The fixed-rope route is designed for advanced climbers only.  According to the cache owner, the route is said to be the most challenging climb in the southern Austrian state of Carinthia.  A helmet, climbing shoes and other pieces of specialized equipment are a must.The view from the route of GCQYK6Geocachers ascend the vertical face of a sheer rock cliff to reach the geocache.  The pictures below tell the heart-racing story and the majestic visual pay-off along the way.  The trek takes geocachers about two and half hours to complete.Along the route of GCQYK6The Multi-Cache tasks geocachers to reach three waypoints before unlocking the code for the coordinates where the physical cache is located.The route also treats geocachers to a rope bridge that dangles climbers over a deep gorge.Waypoint along the route of GCQYK6Paraszczak and Jurko hid the cache in 2005.  Geocachers who’ve logged the find call it one of the absolute highlights of their caching careers.  But only ten brave geocachers have logged smileys to date.GCQYK6 is one of the oldest terrain 5 caches in Austria.  When it was placed, there were fewer than ten terrain 5’s in the country. Now, there more than 250 Terrain 5 geocaches in Austria.There are now more than 1.1 million geocachers in the world.  But only a fraction ever become Geocaches of the Week.  Explore the all the Geocaches of the Week here.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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