Thanksgiving: Who are we fooling?

first_imgThanksgiving is upon us and with it comes an abundance of things for which to be thankful. Family and friends, health, gainful employment, a roof over our heads, and – who could forget – a scrumptious holiday feast. Just thinking about turkey and stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, pumpkin pie and whipped cream sends my salivary glands into overdrive, even though the big day is still a week away. I do try my best to eat well for the other 364 days of the year, but this day is special. No holds barred. Gluttony at its finest.Fortunately the Thanksgiving holiday offers more than just the opportunity to be grateful and to pig out. In addition to the traditional spectator activities that the day brings (the Macy’s parade and Lions football), the annual Turkey Trot has become a ritual for many runners across the country. Our region alone offers at least ten of them, with enticing names such as the Drumstick Dash and the Giblet Jog. What a way to begin the holiday festivities – get your workout done early in the morning, leaving plenty of time for guilt-free gorging.Only one problem – the average 160 lb. Turkey Trotter burns just under four hundred calories in a 5k race. And the average Thanksgiving dinner? Anywhere from 3000 to 4500 calories, depending on how many extra helpings of stuffing you pile on your plate. Another slice of pumpkin pie? Better lace up your shoes – you’ve got 2 ½ more miles to run.Just for fun, I went online to calculate the approximate number of calories I’ll consume this Thanksgiving. By conservative estimates (the calculator didn’t allow for the inevitable seconds of sweet potatoes, stuffing and gravy), I’ll take in 2395 calories. Yikes! I’ll need to run twenty-five miles to burn off that meal.Which brings a dilemma. Forego the seconds? Not a chance. This year, I’m proposing that we ditch the turkey trot 5k’s. Who are we fooling? Those runs don’t even put a dent in our holiday calorie consumption. What we really need are some Thanksgiving ultras. Who’s in for the Fat Turkey 50 Mile? Or maybe the Hungry Pilgrim 100k? Whatever your distance, just get out there – and be thankful for the ability to do so.last_img read more

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Camp Daniel Boone Fire 80% Contained, Cals Creek Fire 90% Contained

first_imgThe cause of both fires remains under investigation. We are in spring wildfire season, and fire danger is expected to remain high across Western North Carolina this week. Due to these extended hazardous fire conditions, the North Carolina Forest Service issued a ban on all open burning for 32 Western North Carolina counties. Photo from Getty Images Firefighters continued to make progress containing the Camp Daniel Boone Fire in Haywood County and the Cals Creek Fire in Macon County. Firefighters are monitoring the fires, which are 80% and 90% contained. Unless conditions change, no additional fire activity is expected on either fire. This will be the last update on the Camp Daniel Boone and Cals Creek fires. The Camp Daniel Boone Fire remained at 72 acres and is now 80% contained. The Lake Logan VFD provided 19 volunteers and a variety of firefighting equipment to protect numerous structures for the first 24 hours. The assistance of these dedicated volunteers is critical in the success of US Forest Service firefighting efforts. The Cals Creek Fire remained at 90 acres and is now 90% contained. The fire started on Friday, April 3, and is burning on US Forest Service land in the Nantahala Ranger District of Nantahala National Forest east Otto, NC. 30 firefighters remain on scene. Firefighters are continuing to monitor the fire and are extinguishing any remaining hot spots near the fire lines. Firefighting resources to contain the Cals Creek fire included federal and state forestry agencies as well as fire crews from The Nature Conservancy. center_img The northern Art Loeb and Little East Fork trailheads remain closed due to the fire operations but are expected to reopen later in the week. For updates on these closures, contact the Pisgah Ranger District, (828) 877-3265. Firefighting resources to contain the Camp Daniel Boone Fire included federal and state forestry agencies as well as the Lake Logan Volunteer Fire Department (VFD). The burning ban went into effect on April 3, and will remain in effect until further notice. The fire started Friday, April 3 on private property off Little East Fork Rd. and burned into the Shining Rock Wilderness Area on the Pisgah Ranger District of Pisgah National Forest. 10 US Forest Service firefighters remain on scene to monitor the fire and patrol for any remaining hot spots near the fire lines. For more information, visit https://ncforestservice.gov/news_pubs/newsdesk_2020.htm. The US Forest Service urges the public to practice caution as they visit the national forests. Visitors are asked to follow guidance under the burn ban and consider postponing their camping trips. Stay up to date on current national forest closures at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/currentclosures.last_img read more

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