COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK UCLA gets another look at the spread option

first_img Volunteer sent home Tennessee has dismissed sophomore tailback LaMarcus Coker for undisclosed reasons. Coach Phillip Fulmer had suspended Coker from one game for a violation of team rules, but said after further investigation he decided to dismiss the player. Fulmer said Coker did not do was what asked of him and he wanted a positive environment for No. 24 Tennessee. Coker was a kick returner and a No. 2 tailback behind Arian Foster. Staff writer Brian Dohn contributed to this notebook.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! From news services UCLA faced its share of spread offenses this season – Washington, Utah and Washington State – and the next in line comes today at Arizona, under the direction of first-year offensive coordinator Sonny Dykes. Bruins cornerback Alterraun Verner said the Wildcats compare best with Utah, which used plenty of misdirection. The Wildcats, led by junior quarterback Willie Tiutama, have attempted 405 passes, 59 more than any other Pacific-10 team, in nine games. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “They’re throwing the ball pretty effectively,” UCLA coach Karl Dorrell said. “That’s part of their offense where they really made a major change in correcting. They have Willie primarily in the (shot) gun most of the offensive sets, and they spread you out. He’s a very good quarterback with an excellent arm.” Tiutama leads the Pac-10 in passing yards per game (311.6), and receiver Mike Thompson has league highs of 63 catches and nine touchdown receptions. But the Wildcats are last in the league in rushing (77 ypg) and rushing attempts (237). “They spread it out and chuck it all over the place,” UCLA linebacker Christian Taylor said. “They run about 30 percent of the time.” Of course, Washington State spent the first half of the season with a throw-first mentality, but ran for 274 yards in beating the Bruins last week. “From what happened last week when we tried to take away the pass,” Taylor said, “I’m sure (Arizona) is going to try and run the ball on us.” last_img read more

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Fox signs on to Movielink venture

first_img But viewers won’t see any of George Lucas’s “Star Wars” films, which Fox distributes in theaters and home video. Fox does not own the Internet distribution rights to the films. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Movielink, a joint venture of five Hollywood studios to offer movies over the Internet, has signed a deal with Twentieth Century Fox, allowing it to offer movies from all major studios for the first time. The deal, announced today, comes at a time when studios and TV networks are looking at alternative ways to distribute programs, including video on demand and portable devices, such as the Apple iPod. While Fox has offered some of its content online at sites such as CinemaNow.com, it has waited until more homes have high-speed Internet access and can view downloaded movies on large screen TVs before signing a deal with Movielink. “I think you’re going to see us be a lot more aggressive in the next few months,” said Peter Levinsohn, president of Worldwide Pay Television and Digital Media at Fox. “This marketplace is really going to start to grow.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Movielink and similar legitimate movie download services exist, in part, to offer an alternative to illegal piracy. Yet Movielink has yet to become popular, in part because films can only be viewed on a computer or watched on a TV screen using a cable. But over the next few months, consumer electronics devices, such as the recently released XBox 360 game console, will allow consumers to more easily view material stored on a hard drive on a large TV screen. Studios also are expected to experiment with other business models, including allowing viewers to purchase movies online and burn a copy to a DVD. “The end of 2005 and into 2006 is really a watershed year,” said Jim Ramo, chief executive at Movielink. “I think you’re beginning to see a snowball effect.” Starting today, Fox will make movies such as “Robots” available and will add more movies over the next few months. last_img read more

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