Two journalists being held for publishing internal security memo on terrorist threat

first_img NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News July 18, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists being held for publishing internal security memo on terrorist threat RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance RSF_en to go further Al Watan Al An’s most recent issue, published on 14 July, contained a series of stories by Ariri et and Hurmatallah that were headlined, “The secret reports behind Morocco’s state of alert.” One of the stories was based on a DGST memo – which was reproduced – urging all the security services to be vigilant after a video was posted online by a terrorist organisation that contained “a solemn call for jihad against all the Maghrebi governments, identifying Morocco by name.”Morocco raised its state of alert to the highest level on 6 July, but the interior ministry has given no precise information about the possible threats.In a statement carried by the main national TV station, prosecutor general Moulay Abdallah Alaoui Belghiti said he had ordered an investigation to find out how secret documents were leaked and who was responsible. The two journalists would be prosecuted for publishing “reports of a confidential nature linked to defence secrets,” he said, adding that other document found during the search would be used in evidence against them.Ariri and Hurmatallah, who are due to appear in court soon, were not allowed to see their lawyers during the preliminary investigation. Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa June 8, 2021 Find out more Organisation News Receive email alertscenter_img Reporters Without Borders condemns the arrest of Abderrahim Ariri, the publisher of the weekly Al Watan Al An (The Nation Now), and one of his journalists, Mostapha Hurmatallah, yesterday in Casablanca after they published the text of an internal security memo circulated by the General Directorate for Territorial Surveillance (DGST), an intelligence agency.“It is wrong to arrest these two journalists and keep them in custody, especially as it would have sufficed to summon them for questioning,” the press freedom organisation said. “It seems as if this is meant to be a warning to any journalist who might be inclined to investigate Morocco’s ability to defend itself against terrorism.”Reporters Without Borders added: “We urge the Moroccan authorities to have the good sense to release them at once. The internal memo published in the weekly seems not to have contained any confidential information as it only referred to online posts that anyone can access. While it is understandable that the authorities are trying to find out who leaked the memo, the journalists should not be turned into scapegoats.”Plain-clothes police arrested Ariri and Hurmatallah at their Casablanca homes at about 7 a.m. yesterday and took them to police headquarters for questioning. At mid-morning, about 20 police officers accompanied them to the Al Watan Al An office, where a search was carried out. Editor Boujemaa Achefri said they took away 90 per cent of the newspaper’s files, as well as Ariri’s computer, mobile phone and diary. Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Help by sharing this information News News Reporters Without Borders condemns the arrest yesterday of Abderrahim Ariri, the publisher of the Arabic-language weekly Al Watan Al An, and one of his journalists, Mostapha Hurmatallah. They are being held for publishing the text of a confidential security memo that was circulated by a Moroccan intelligence agency. April 28, 2021 Find out more Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Borlaug Fellows

first_imgFor many Indian families, “pulse” crops – lentils and other legumes that are eaten as porridges – are essential. Not only are they an important source of protein, but these pulse crops can also grow on poor soil and produce lentils and legumes even with limited and erratic rainfall.Despite their resiliency, production levels of these important crops have declined over the past 70 years, according to Sushil Yadav, a Borlaug Fellow who spent four months at the University of Georgia Center for Applied Genetic Technologies working with Zenglu Li, learning “metabolic fingerprinting” skills that he’ll take back to India.“Eighty percent of the farms in the Hyderabad area of India are small and marginal,” said Yadav, who is a scientist at the Central Research Institute for Dryland Research there. “If we can identify the key genetic regulators for enhancing drought-stress tolerance in these crops, we can stabilize their productivity and increase their availability to a very large vegetarian population in India.”Yadav is one of three international researchers who studied with UGA faculty this spring as part of the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. The program, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service, promotes food security and economic growth by providing training and collaborative research opportunities to researchers and policymakers from developing or middle-income countries who are in the early or middle stages of their careers, according to the USDA’s website. At UGA, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Global Programs manages the program.Also studying at UGA through the Borlaug Fellowship Program are Direba Demisse of Ethiopia and Reham Fathey Aly of Egypt.“Ethiopia has more than 50 million head of cattle, but milk production is very low. In fact, we have to import milk from other countries,” said Demisse, national project coordinator for smallholder dairy cattle genetic improvement research at the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research in Holeta. “If we can use modern molecular technologies to increase the number of improved animals while conserving indigenous genetic resources and develop a clear breeding strategy, we can improve our country’s food security.”During his stay, Demisse worked with Ignacy Misztal in the college’s Department of Animal and Dairy Science.Aly, who will remain at UGA until late July, said she has learned a great deal about integrated pest management (IPM), which she plans to introduce to her colleagues in the agricultural zoology and nematology department at the Cairo University in Giza, Egypt.“I’ve learned so much about the principles of bioassay and how applicable the work I’m doing here will be in Egypt,” said Aly, who is working with Ashfaq Sial in the UGA entomology department. “Not only will the work I’m learning be useful in the management and mitigation of the peach fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly, but I hope to write a project that uses IPM for the control of snails, which have become a major pest in Egypt.”Sial, whose research includes developing new integrated pest management techniques to control spotted wing drosophila in blueberries, said he looks forward to traveling to Egypt later this year to continue his work with Aly.“One of the many benefits of the Borlaug Fellowship is the opportunity for mentors to travel to the fellow’s country,” he said. “At this point, Egypt has very little understanding of IPM techniques and relies more on chemical options to control pests. I think there are a lot of opportunities to establish partnerships with researchers there that could particularly benefit fruit and vegetable growers in both Georgia and parts of Egypt.”Borlaug fellows are selected annually based on research proposals submitted to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. Once the fellows have been selected, U.S. universities bid to host them, identifying research mentors and arranging logistics. Costs are covered by the Borlaug Fellowship Program.“We have been hosting Borlaug Fellows in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences since 2006 and have had researchers from Armenia, Rwanda, Malawi, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Kosovo, Iraq, Pakistan, the Philippines and Poland,” according to Victoria McMaken, associate director of the Office of Global Programs.“There are a number of benefits for both the individual fellows and mentors, but because all of these projects are related to food security, the University of Georgia, the state of Georgia and the United States all benefit from creating long-standing connections with university and research institutions throughout the world,” McMaken said.last_img read more

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Rising star Jyotika Dutta wins fencing gold

first_imgBhubaneswar: Size does not always matter. Ask Himachal Pradeshs Jyotika Dutta, the epee specialist who is taking the Indian fencing world by storm. Petite, lean and more often than not the shorter fencer in a competition, that has rarely come in her way of overpowering taller and bigger opponents.The 22-year-old underlined her growing stature in the sport on Sunday, clinching the first gold for Guru Nanak Dev University at Amritsar in Punjab in the fencing competition of the Khelo India University Games here.Just back from a highly productive stint in France, at the International Fencing federation’s high performance centre, Jyotika used that experience to bail herself out from a tricky start.“Adversity teaches you a lot,” she laughed, brushing aside her two defeats in the group stage. “I had some rough starts but was determined not to make the same mistakes in the knockouts.”And sure enough she didn’t. Up against an opponent at least six inches taller than her in Yashkeerat Hayer, Jyotika raced to a five-point lead and completed an emphatic 15-5 win.The final was a much tougher proposition, with Linthoi Haobam (Manipur University) matching her point by point. Yet, Jyotika prevailed 15-14 in a tense bout, using her small frame and quick feet to her advantage.The Rohru girl started fencing almost 15 years back at the behest of her cousin Jiteshwar Dutta, a fencer and a part-time coach. No one around her, in her small town, had ever heard of the sport.“In the early days my cousin would train me. He would procure the equipment and teach me the basics,” she explained. “I was a sprinter earlier; so I was obviously fitter than most girls my age.”Almost immediately her talent was obvious, and cousin Jiteshwar registered her for a trial at NIS Patiala. It has become Jyotika’s home since then.She attracted attention at the 2018 Asian Games, powering her way all the way to the quarterfinals. In the two years since then, she has only been climbing up, making it to the higher echelons in the sport. IANSAlso Read: Archana Dutta to Lead Assam in Senior T20 Women CricketAlso Watch: Burglars breaks into a house in Lumding, steal 21-tola Gold and cash of Rs 45,000last_img read more

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