Outdoor Updates: Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers

first_imgPlainfield Township officials have approved zoning to protect their 1½-mile section of the Appalachian Trail. It will prevent projects like natural gas pipelines, wind turbines, solar panels, and cellphone towers from being located near the scenic footpath. The Truth About Recycling: Why Recycling has stopped in many places in the U.S. The global recycling system wasn’t ever perfectly eco-friendly. Recycling operators had been known to illegally burn or bury recycling waste, causing a ripple effect of pollution including contaminated water, killed crops, respiratory illnesses, and long-lasting negative impacts on the environment overall. What happens to the waste we think we’re recycling? For decades, many countries, including us, send plastic waste to China and Southeast Asia for recycling. But just last year, China and many other Asian countries, banned the import due to the overwhelming amount they already had, according to the Business Insider. This has tragically lead to burning and landfills in many of our major cities. center_img Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers The Morning Call reported that The Appalachian Trail Conservancy provided a $16,900 grant covering the cost of a consultant from the Bethlehem-based Urban Research and Development Corp. to draft an ordinance with the township. The ordinance includes guidelines for controlling light pollution, the withdraw of groundwater, digital signs, noise, commercial outdoor recreation, residential developments, solar panels, natural gas pipelines and wind turbines.last_img read more

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Tattoo Artists Rally on Long Island Against New Ink Law

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Tattoo artists rallied Wednesday in Centereach to urge New York State lawmakers to change a new law that they say would adversely impact their businesses by driving up costs and reducing quality.The new law requires tattoo artists to use more expensive prepackaged, sealed ink shots that have lesser quality than the inks that artists currently use, which come in large bottles and can be poured into single-use disposable ink caps. Tattoo artists held a news conference at Cliff’s Tattoo, Inc. to persuade the legislature to amend the law before it goes into effect in three months.“While driving the prices up, and driving our customers out, not only will they be going to other states,” said Michael O’Herien, owner of Revolution Tattoo Co. in Pearl River, “but it is also another concern that they will be going to elusive sources—people tattooing outside of their homes, or out of their garage.”Passed in June, the law takes effect Dec. 12. Ostensibly, it is aimed at preventing the spread of Hepatitis C. But tattoo artists argue that the current standard industry practice is approved by the state health department. They are also calling for a statewide unified licensing and permitting process.“This new law is an important step toward preventing the spread of infectious diseases and in holding accountable those who don’t take the proper precautions,” said Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a statement when he signed the bill into law last month.The law also codified the industry practice of tattoo artists only using single-use needles for the same reason. But critics argue that if the law’s ink rule drives up the price of tattoos, it may drive consumers to unregulated home-based tattoo artists whose practices may be less sanitary—possibly having the opposite effect of the law’s intention to limit infections.Opponents have formed an online petition that had nearly 50,000 signatures as of this post urging the state legislature to fix the law before December.“I strongly support changing the wording of the legislation regarding the process by which ink is used,” said New York State Sen. Phil Boyle (R-Bay Shore). “We need to be willing to work on legislation that not only promotes the health and safety of consumers, but protects the interests of our business community as well.”last_img read more

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Dortmund’s struggling Kagawa eyes Spain move

first_img0Shares0000Kagawa is one of Japan’s most successful footballing exports © AFP / Emmanuel DUNANDTOKYO, Japan, Nov 27 – Attacking midfielder Shinji Kagawa, one of Japan’s most successful footballing exports, on Tuesday made a passionate plea for a transfer to Spain as he struggles with German outfit Borussia Dortmund.Kagawa was a key part of the celebrated Dortmund side that won back-to-back Bundesliga titles at the start of the decade but has found himself unable to get regular first-team football under Lucian Favre. And the 29-year-old told Nikkan Sports: “Over the past two to three years, I have always been thinking about what I can do to go to Spain.“I cannot end my career as a football player without going to Spain. I absolutely want to achieve that.”The Japan international had a brief spell at Old Trafford but also found himself on the fringes so returned to Dortmund in 2014 hoping to rebuild his confidence.But injuries and an influx of younger talent have left him out of favour at the high-flying west German side, which sits on top of the Bundesliga table unbeaten with nine wins out of 12.“I want to find a solution to this situation. One is to change teams,” Kagawa said.“I have this growing sense of wishing to change my environment and take on new challenges,” he said.“I have nothing to lose. I am confident that I can shine in the next stage of my career,” he said of a possible transfer to Spain, adding that a spell in La Liga would be “the biggest challenge of my career.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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