Flag discourtesy

first_imgRe “Why?” (Your opinions, Nov. 25): Martha Evans asked why anyone would steal an American flag from her front porch. There are two possibilities: First, there are a few people who can’t tolerate such a display of patriotism. Second, if the flag was left outside after dark, someone who hates such discourtesy to the flag may have been the culprit. – Sid Conkwright Van Nuys – Trudy Sibley Northridge Yagman caught Re “Attorney Yagman gets three-year sentence” (Nov. 28): I’ve been wondering when the law would catch up with Stephen Yagman. I’ve been following his shenanigans for more than 20 years. His sentence is too light. – Evelyn Kaufman Studio City City thuggery Re “$52-a-parcel tax proposed for transportation” (Nov. 29): Every time the Los Angeles City Council wants money, it attacks homeowners. Why should the property owners alone pay for every improvement in the city? There are far more renters in town. Why not share the cost fairly? Could it be that Councilman Tom “LaSponge” LaBonge knows he will never get support for a new tax that reaches into everyone’s pocket? He and the council would rather persecute a minority, knowing they don’t have the numbers to override the tax, while the majority has nothing to lose. This is mob rule and thuggery at its worst. – Michael Guetzow Woodland Hills A Buckeye fan Re “Daily News rankings” (Nov. 28): For Scott Wolf to rank Ohio State seventh in the nation and add the comment “Nation dreads Buckeyes in the title game” are actions of a person out of touch with reality. Yes, Ohio State was beaten by Florida last year – badly – but this was due to coaching errors. This year it has the best defense in the country against good competition, with the exception of two weak teams. Yes, Ohio State lost to Illinois but Illinois is a good team. Scott Wolf wouldn’t know a good football team if the whole team fell on his head. – Harvey M. Piccus Tarzana Getting better Re “School tragedy” (You opinions, Nov. 30): It’s pretty standard to try to get your child enrolled wherever you consider the best school. But letter writer Terese Manzano got it wrong because there is no Agua Dulce High. The only high school in the Acton-Agua Dulce school system is Vasquez High School. It is certainly not as nice as the Hart district’s high schools and doesn’t have the same high test scores. That is primarily because most of the brighter parents place their kids in private school. The new school board has terminated some of the trash teachers and a thoroughly incompetent superintendent and principal. Test scores are going up, and more parents are keeping their kids in the high school. – Charles Brink North Hills Grade deflation Re “Prized recruits can’t make grade at UCLA” (Nov. 30): It would appear that the campaign to save Bruins coach Karl Dorrell’s job is now in full swing? Dorrell can’t recruit players because UCLA admission standards are too high? Am I to believe that this is bad? Isn’t that what a university is for? I wonder what the admission standards are at Utah, Notre Dame, Washington State, etc.? They must be lower than UCLA’s since they’ve got the better players. – William Conroy Northridge160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Pending disaster To even hint that SC abandon the Coliseum for the Rose Bowl reeks of treason and stupidity. The Rose Bowl is great – for the Rose Bowl January game. I can put up with the horrible no-back seats, the nightmare parking and the lack of access for the January game. But for SC home games? Ugh! The Coliseum is adjacent to campus. It has great seats, good access, OK parking, the Olympic torch, museums, diversity and the real urban downtown Los Angeles. Councilman Bernard Parks et al. must have visions of sugar-NFLs dancing in their heads to allow this pending disaster to come so far. last_img read more

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Asian block of nations behind Anil Khanna for ITF presidency

first_imgAll India Tennis Association president Anil Khanna has the support from the Asian block of nations as he contests the International Tennis Federation election for the post of president in Santiago, Chile, on Friday.There are three other candidates in fray: David Haggerty (USA), Juan Margets Lobato (Spain) and Rene Stammbach (Switzerland).Francesco Ricci Bitti is stepping down after a 16-year term and there is a buzz in tennis circles that an Asian candidate has a realistic chance. Khanna has been a board member of the ITF and also done a lot for integrating the Asian tennis fraternity. He has often talked of how the men’s professional tour (ATP) events are heavily concentrated in Europe and Asia has taken a backseat.For a country which does not have a single player in the top 100 in singles ranking (men or women), it may appear strange that an Indian candidate is in fray for the ITF top job. However, Khanna has brought to India two Challengers, 15 Futures events and 14 women’s events carrying a total prize money of $4,95,000.He has also ensured there are an adequate number of events for juniors under the ITF banner.When Khanna spoke to the media last week he said: “I wouldn’t be contesting the election if I did not have a chance of winning.”There is no doubting American candidate David Haggerty is popular, but with two candidates from Europe contesting, votes will be split. Then again, outgoing president Ricci Bitti is also from Europe – Italy.advertisementIn all, 145 nations have voting rights at the annual general meeting where a lot of lobbying takes place. The president and 13 other members to be elected alongside will be in office for a four-year period from 2015 to 2019. There are 37 Asian countries with voting rights.There will be a first-round elimination for the president’s post and the remaining two will be involved in a straight shootout. It is no secret that the ITF, with its headquarters in London, has been dominated by the European countries. For an Asian to be considered as a candidate with a chance as good as the other three should not be a matter of surprise.After all, when late Jagmohan Dalmiya stormed world cricket’s bastion (ICC) and became president, it was seen as the start of a revolution. N. Srinivasan followed suit and it has opened up a window of opportunities for Indian sports administrators.For the record, his brother N. Ramachandran heads the world squash body.last_img read more

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