Leicester fan banned from stadium after jumping barrier to hug Vichai’s son

first_imgThe moment came at the end of the Foxes’ first home match – a 0-0 draw with Burnley – since the helicopter crash in which Vichai and four others perished on October 28.Self-employed carpenter and joiner Tom, of Newfoundpool, Leicester left his friends and family in the stand to hug ‘Top’, who reciprocated his embrace.Security staff moved in and took him to a holding cell, before the club wrote to inform him he had been banned from attending the stadium for three months.Merry told the Leicester Mercury newspaper: “I couldn’t help myself, I just wanted to give Top a cuddle.”The season-ticket holder will be allowed back at the King Power in the New Year. shining review Leicester City supporter Tom Merry has been banned from the King Power Stadium for three months after entering the pitch to hug Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha’s son during his lap of thanks.Aiyawatt ‘Top’ Srivaddhanaprabha walked around the ground to show his appreciation to the club’s fans in the wake of his father’s death last month before being hugged by one man who invaded the pitch to console him. targets gameday cracker ANALYSIS revealed The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 1 Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars BIG PRESENTS UP TOP Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT REVEALED Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Chelsea beat Spurs, Man United lose – What happened in the Premier League Latest Leicester City News Alternative Premier League table based on expected goals – lucky Spurs? Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade What every Premier League club’s fans dream of this Christmas ‘Top’ Srivaddhanaprabha thanked the Leicester faithful with their players RANKED heads up Leicester will learn from Man City defeat ahead of Liverpool clash, says Rodgerslast_img read more

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NY Team Made Baseball History in Cuba

first_imgROCHESTER, N.Y. — News that President Barack Obama is moving to normalize relations with Cuba has some baseball fans remembering a time when Cuban baseball was big, and the night in 1960 when the Rochester Red Wings fled Havana while explosions rocked the city. They were the last American team to play a regular game in Cuba before the U.S. embargo went into effect.It was a time when the International League was truly international, featuring five teams in the United States, two in Canada, and one in Cuba — the Havana Sugar Kings.They were a farm club for the Washington Senators from 1947 to 1952, and then for the Cincinnati Reds. The Sugar Kings featured a number of future major league stars — including Cuban natives Leo Cardenas, Mike Cuellar, and Cookie Rojas — and won the International League Championship in 1959.The Red Wings traveled to Havana for a series in late July that year. Before their game, Fidel Castro, the leader of the Cuban revolution, staged an exhibition game between a team of his supporters and a team of military police. Castro pitched two innings and helped whip the crowd into a frenzy.The game stretched into extra innings, and at midnight the crowd erupted as the new day began. It was the 26th of July, a date traditionally celebrated as the beginning of the Cuban revolution.Democrat and Chronicle reporter George Beahon, who was in the stadium that night, gave this account:“Promptly at midnight, rockets in the background behind the stadium signaled the start of Cuba’s first July 26 celebration. The Cuban anthem played and everyone rose to sing. At the same time, weapons inside and outside the ballpark began firing.”It wasn’t simply a noisy spectacle. Bullets fired into the air must come down, of course. One stray bullet struck Red Wing infielder Frank Verdi in the head while he was warming up between innings. Fortunately for him, he was wearing a plastic helmet liner inside of his cap, otherwise he might have been killed. Verdi thought he had been struck by a baseball.“Then I saw the bullet on the ground,” Verdi later recounted. “It was a good size, a .45. It hit me right in the side of the head and took part of my ear off, then hit me in the shoulder. It really didn’t bother me until an hour later, when I started to think about what happened. Hell, bullets were falling out of the sky like hailstones that night.”Shortstop Cardenas was not so lucky. A bullet struck him in the right shoulder blade a few minutes later. At that point, both teams fled the field. The game ended in a tie.A headline on the front page of the Democrat and Chronicle the next day offered this assessment: Nightmare in Havana — Wings in Real Danger.The International League had concerns about sending teams back to Cuba, canceling the rest of the Sugar Kings’ homestand. An official apology issued by Cuba caused the league to reverse course.Tensions between the United States and Cuba had increased significantly by the time the Red Wings returned to Havana in June of 1960. Shortly before the start of their double header, a deafening explosion shook Havana and cut off power to Gran Stadium, delaying the start of the game by an hour and a half.“It was a warlike atmosphere,” Beahon recounted. “The Cubans weren’t even trying to hide their antagonism.” The Red Wings lost the first game of a doubleheader, and the second game was halted by curfew in the ninth with the score tied 3-3. It was to be completed on the next Wings visit to Havana.That visit would never happen.Days later, under increasing pressure from Secretary of State Christian Herter, the International League moved the Sugar Kings from Havana to Jersey City, New Jersey, where they were rechristened the Jersey City Jerseys.It would be almost 40 years before another American baseball team competed in Cuba. In March 1999, the Baltimore Orioles played an exhibition game against the Cuban national baseball team in Havana. One Orioles player, Cuban refugee Rafael Palmeiro, refused to participate, citing the hardships his family had endured under the Castro regime.Hundreds of Cuban ballplayers have come to the United States to play baseball since Castro came to power. Many risked their lives and endured exploitation to escape.Some have even speculated that an American team might move to Havana. But until that happens, the Rochester Red Wings will remain as the last American ball club to play a regulation game in Cuba.(SEAN LAHMAN, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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With USA out, Fox could lose millions in World Cup

first_imgUnited States With U.S. out of picture, Fox could lose millions in World Cup dollars Michael McCarthy Last updated 2 years ago 03:06 10/20/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(5) Michael Bradley Christian Pulisic USA Getty United States World Cup The USMNT will miss the World Cup for the first time since 1986, and the television network is poised to lose up to $20 million due to its failure Fox Sports is smiling bravely, but no amount of spin by the network can hide the damage caused by the U.S. men’s soccer team’s dramatic crash and burn out of the 2018 FIFA World Cup.Fox is poised to lose an estimated $10 million to $20 million because of the U.S. team’s failure to reach the tournament final in Russia. The network shelled out $400 million to beat ESPN for the English-language rights to four World Cups from 2015-22, including the men’s World Cups in 2018 and 2022. USA’s absence is expected to hurt U.S. TV ratings, particularly early in the tournament.Some U.S. advertisers who have previously bought airtime will probably stay on the sideline now that the tournament likely will generate less TV/radio/online coverage than anticipated. Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Financial analyst Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research Group estimates a negative impact for Fox in the “low tens” of millions.”Reports indicating a $10 million to $20 million negative impact for Fox from the U.S. team’s failure to qualify seem correct and represent a negligible amount for the network,” he wrote in a research report while analyzing the impact on parent company 21st Century Fox.Wieser, in fact, believes the seven-hour time difference between Russia and the U.S. Eastern Time Zone will be more of a problem for Fox than the absence of the U.S. team. ESPN had to deal with time differences of one to two hours while broadcasting the 2014 World Cup from Brazil. “Arguably the challenging time zone (with the 2018 tournament hosted in Russia) will prove to cause a more significant factor depressing viewing when comparing 2018 vs. 2014,” Wieser added.Meanwhile, advertising industry bible Adweek warned Fox will likely suffer “a big ratings hit” without the U.S. squad playing. “More than a dozen” advertisers had agreed to buy time on Fox’s broadcasts before the U.S. team’s failure, Adweek’s Jason Lynch wrote, and the network was deep in talks “with FIFA partners like Adidas and Coca-Cola.”Soccer TV analysts were stunned by the USMNT’s ignominious exit.Fox’s Alexi Lalas, a former national team player, felt shame.”This team, they failed themselves, they failed the sport and they failed their country,” he told Colin Cowherd on FS1.Who can forget ESPN soccer analyst Taylor Twellman’s angry rant following the team’s 2-1 loss to Trindidad and Tobago on the final night of CONCACAF qualifying? “This is an utter embarrassment,” the former USMNT member declared as he practically came out of his chair on the set.Fox, in keeping its chin up publicly, issued a statement saying the United States’ loss did not change its “passion” for the world’s biggest sporting event. The statement was a preview of how the network plans to generate enthusiasm in the States for a U.S.-less World Cup.”While the U.S. was eliminated, the biggest stars in the world from Lionel Messi to Cristiano Ronaldo stamped their tickets to Russia on the same day, and will battle teams ranging from Mexico to England that have massive fan bases in America,” the statement read. “The World Cup is the greatest sporting event on earth that changes the world for one month every four years, and FOX Sports remains steadfast in our commitment of bringing the games to America for the first time in 2018 and will continue to support the U.S. Soccer Federation as they look ahead to the 2022 World Cup.”The network has to hope that the country’s growing Latino population, and the continued growth of soccer in the U.S., will be enough to put it over the top next summer.Fox is planning 350 hours of World Cup coverage, with its main TV set located in Moscow’s Red Square. During a launch event in New York last month, now-former team manager Bruce Arena guaranteed the U.S. would qualify.“I will tell you this: We’re going to be there, and I’m going to miss all this great Fox coverage,” Arena said, per Sports Illustrated .Now Arena will have plenty of time to watch that TV coverage.last_img read more

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