FORMER COUNCILLOR ATTACKED BOSSES AFTER HE WAS FIRED

first_imgFormer county councillor Gareth ReidFORMER Donegal County Councillor Gareth Reid has admitted assaulting two company directors after he was fired from his job.Letterkenny District Court heard the 31-year-old father of three was fired from his job at his grandfather’s car dealership on November 19, 2012. He had been brought before the company directors, including JJ Reid, where he was fired.But Gareth Reid waited outside where he attacked company directors Patrick McGinty and Alan Stoddard.Garda Inspector Michael Harrison told the court that Mr McGinty was left with a  bloody nose, a cut eyebrow and a sore jaw after being punched by Reid.Fellow direct Mr Stoddard was kicked during the attack and ended up on the ground.Reid admitted assault causing harm against Mr McGinty and assault against Mr Stoddard.Both men were left “badly shaken” by the incident, said the inspector.Defence solicitor Kieran Dillon told Judge Paul Kelly that Reid had brought €500 to court for Mr McGinty and €250 for Mr Stoddard as compensation for the attack.He said his client had worked at the long-established motor dealership from a young age.He had gone to England to work but had returned to the family business in 2009.However he claimed he had found the direction of the business had changed and there were disagreements.Reid, said the solicitor, had gone to the meeting hoping that a plan for the future could be agreed but instead he had been made redundant.“It seems this meeting was called to dismiss him and he took it very badly,” said Mr Dillon.“He deeply regrets his actions.”Judge Paul Kelly said he wanted the views of the victims of the attack before passing sentence on read.He adjourned sentence until February 17 to allow this to happen and also to allow for the preparation of a probation report.FORMER COUNCILLOR ATTACKED BOSSES AFTER HE WAS FIRED was last modified: December 17th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultCouncillorDonegal County CouncilFine GaelGareth Reidlast_img read more

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Cell Nucleus Complexity Baffles Evolutionists

first_imgIn her inimitable way, Science reporter Elizabeth Pennisi has once again portrayed a scientific controversy undergoing active ferment.  This time it’s about the evolutionary origin of cell nuclei, which she terms “specialized, DNA-filled command centers.”1  At the conclusion, she gives prominence to a “provocative, but circumstantial and controversial” suggestion that viruses taught cells how to wrap their DNA in double membranes with controlled access.  Since the idea presupposes that viruses preceded all three domains of life – prokarya, eukarya and archaea – “If this is true, then we are all basically descended from viruses,” as a believer puts it.  The idea is unpalatable to some.  “I do not believe [it],” a German molecular biologist retorts.  “The idea of the viruses ‘inventing’ [eukaryotic cells] from scratch is hard for me to conceive.”    Pennisi treats the new viral theory as tentative at best.  What’s more revealing in her article are the problems with previously-popular ideas, and why.  According to her, the key insight at a meeting in France last month on the subject was: “They had underestimated the complexity of the eukaryotic cell’s 1.5-billion-year-old precursor.  The data presented indicated that this ancestral cell had more genes, more structures, and more diverse biochemical processes than previously imagined.”  For a glimpse why, look at Pennisi’s brief description of the nucleus:Each nucleus in a eukaryotic cell consists of a double lipid-based membrane punctuated by thousands of sophisticated protein complexes called nuclear pores, which control molecular traffic in and out of the organelle.  Inside, polymerases and other specialized enzymes transfer DNA’s protein-coding message to RNA.  Other proteins modify the strands of RNA to ensure that they bring an accurate message to the ribosomes outside the nucleus.  The nucleus also contains a nucleolus, a tightly packed jumble of RNA and proteins that are modified and shipped out of the nucleus to build ribosomes.(For more on the nuclear pore complex, see 06/17/2002 and 01/18/2002 headlines.)Eukaryotes are distinguished from bacteria by their double-membrane nuclei.  “The nuclear distinction between prokaryotes and eukaryotes shaped early speculation about the development of complex life,” Pennisi says about ideas floating around up to the 1970s.  Some thought eukaryotes were evolved prokaryotes, and others thought prokaryotes were degenerate eukaryotes.  But then Carl Woese created new woes by identifying bacteria-like cells that were distinct from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes: so different, in fact, to warrant classification in their own domain – archaea.  Others soon were surprised to find that eukaryotes appeared to have genes from both bacteria and archaea.    So another story was born, the endosymbiont or merger hypothesis.  This proposed that eukaryotes arose from “the ancient symbiotic partnership between bacteria and archaea.”  That theory came under fire from the discovery of faint but distinct nuclei in an unusual group of bacteria, named planctomycetes, that live in soil and fresh water.  Some of these planctomycetes have organelles and double-membraned sacs of DNA and RNA.  According to a critic of the merger model, these observations “turn the dogma that ‘prokaryotes have no internal membranes’ upside down”  Now, it seems no one is sure which way is up.    There’s more to cause vertigo for evolutionists: the complexity of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs).  “Explaining these structures has always posed a sticking point for nuclear evolution.”  For one thing, “without pores, the nucleus can’t function.”  But for another thing, Pennisi continues, the same planctomycetes, and possibly some other archaea and prokaryotes, apparently possess structures resembling these complex traffic-control gates.  “Bacteria with nuclear pores and internal membranes, features typically considered eukaryote-specific, suggest that the nucleus was born much earlier than traditionally thought.”    For some, that leaves as the leading contender the controversial theory that viruses first invented the nucleus.  This, however, only pushes the complexity of nuclei and their pores farther back in time, and foists a huge design problem on earth’s most primitive biological entities.  That is why the molecular biologist quoted earlier can’t believe that simple viruses created such complex structures from scratch.  Pennisi shares a few speculations, based on circumstantial evidence, how it might have happened.  But when she ends by pushing the answer to the future, it underscores the fact that no current theory accounts for the origin of the nucleus:Did a virus provide the first nucleus?  Or was it something an early bacterial cell evolved, either on its own or in partnership with an archaeum?  To resolve the origin of the nucleus, evolutionary biologists are exploring new techniques that enable them to determine relationships of microorganisms that go much further back in time….The biologists in France argued and discussed many ideas.  “But when it came to accounting for how the nucleus was born,” Pennisi admits, “no single hypothesis bubbled to the top.”  She quotes French molecular biologist Patrick Forterre who said, “It’s like a puzzle.  People try to put all the pieces together, but we don’t know who is right or if there is still some crucial piece of information missing.”1Elizabeth Pennisi, “Evolutionary Biology: The Birth of the Nucleus,” Science, Vol 305, Issue 5685, 766-768, 6 August 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.305.5685.766].The crucial piece of missing information is information itself.  Information: DNA, logic, codes, controlled access, complex systems of integrated parts: these are all indicators of intelligent design.  This would be obvious if the biologists at that meeting would only think outside the Darwinian box in which they have imprisoned themselves.  Look at what contortions they have to go through to account for such biological complexity by chance.  As usual, the answer is somewhere out there in the future.  Also as usual, the same trend is seen here as in everything else in biology, and even in paleontology and cosmology: more complexity, further back toward the beginning.    Poor Elizabeth.  She has reported on so many of these evolutionist hand-wringing sessions you would think she might have taken up gardening by now to maintain her sanity.  But that might not help.  Just looking at the soil and thinking about those planctomycetes, and looking at the leaves and thinking about those nuclear pore complexes, DNA decoders accurately translating messages into specialized enzymes, all those shipping and receiving docks, and all the other thousands of sophisticated complexes working together in those command centers called nuclei might bring the stress and anxiety right back again.  “Come unto Me,” said the Designer, “all you who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”(Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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How to Liven Up Dead Geology

first_img(Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A new study shows some carbon compounds from Mars arose from geological processes.  What does life have to do with it?  Ask some science reporters.The facts:  According to a new study by the Carnegie Institution, some carbon compounds in Martian meteorites arose by chemical processes on the red planet, probably volcanism.  The compounds in the famous Martian ALH 84001 meteorite that sparked the birth of the new science of Astrobiology in the 1990s were also found to be non-biological in origin.  This means the compounds have nothing whatsoever to do with life.One might suspect this would be tragic news for those who have devoted their careers to finding life on Mars, but here’s how popular news reports treated the story:Live Science began by saying that organic compounds (by definition, those containing carbon, including cyanide and tailpipe soot) are “linked with life” and used the popular phrase, “building blocks of life” twice.  It quoted a scientist saying, “We now find that Mars has organic chemistry, and on Earth, organic chemistry led to life.”  The article was more “lively” than the dead geology facts indicated.  It even turned the bad news (astrobiologically speaking) into good news: “Now that scientists have a better picture of the foundations of Martian chemistry, they can better look for anomalies that might be signs of life,” reporter Charles Q. Choi said.Science Daily also used the suggestive phrase “building blocks of life” and accentuated how the new knowledge of dead rock “will help aid future quests for evidence of ancient or modern Martian life“.New Scientist called the finding that “Tiny carbon nuggets in meteorites from Mars were formed by cooling magma, not left by ancient alien microbes” to be “good news and bad news for astrobiologists.”  MacGregor Campbell’s headline read, quizzically, “Bottled carbon from Mars bodes well for ancient aliens.”  Campbell quoted a researcher who brought the lava, like Lazarus, from the dead with a word: “The presence of organic carbon at or near the Martian surface provides a potential nutrient source for putative life.”    The ending paragraph, which mentions St. Paul, would probably make the creationist saint roll over in his tomb:“Perhaps the formation of prebiotic chemistry on Mars was as simple as cooling of Martian lavas,” says Marc Hirschmann, a planetary scientist at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and St. Paul, who was not involved in the research. “It reinforces the idea that early Mars may have been ripe for the development of life.“National Geographic topped off the lava-lamp theory of life (9/17/2003) by suggesting that Earth life came from volcanoes, too.  “Magma Rise Sparked Life as We Know It?” Reporter Ken Croswell  began.  “Shift in planet’s volcanoes flooded Earth with oxygen, study says.”  He even deduced the middle ages: “First, though, the rise of oxygen subjected our planet to a mid-life crisis: Oxygen readily reacts with methane, a greenhouse gas that had been warming the world before the oxidation event,”  he ended.  “With a drop in atmospheric methane, Earth and its inhabitants suffered the planet’s first major ice age.”  Nevertheless, like Campbell agreed, just having the potential molecules, whether carbon or oxygen, makes a planet ripe for putative life.While we’re at the Game of Life, why not just define volcanoes as alive already?  Charles Lineweaver, in an interview for New Scientist, lamented the typical woes of defining life, so he “moved the bar” a little with a provocative definition of his own.  Asked how he would define life, he answered, “To the extent that the question makes sense, as a ‘far-from-equilibrium dissipative system’.”  When confronted with the fact that this makes hurricanes and stars (and presumably volcanoes) alive, he responded, “I’m moving the bar in what I consider to be a reasonable way. People should be disappointed, not at my moving the bar, but in the unrealistic expectation that there should be a bar where we have traditionally placed it.”Unexpectedly, Lineweaver scoffed at the idea that life can be defined as something that undergoes Darwinian evolution.  “We pretend that makes sense, but if you look it makes no sense at all,” he remarked.  “What is the unit of Darwinian evolution? Is it the gene? Is it the cell? Is it a multicellular organism? Is a city evolving? How about Gaia? Is that a life form?”  Perhaps allowing a star, hurricane or volcano to qualify as life forms has the advantage of legitimizing Astrobiology and making the search for life on Mars a lot easier.  Just don’t ask Lineweaver what the unit of a far-from-equilibrium dissipative system is.This is more evidence that evolutionists are really animists and pantheists.  They turn lava lakes into gardens of Eden.  Just add water; just add lava; just add oxygen — all dead things –  and what happens?  Emergence. “Some two billion years later, Earth’s oxygen-rich air allowed animals—including humans—to emerge and thrive,” Croswell wrote.  The universe is brimming with a life force, a potentiality that permeates space and time, filling volcanoes and meteorites with putative possibilities, accumulating building blocks of life so that the Unseen Hand of Evolution, the Tinkerer, Gaia, or whatever (doesn’t need to make any sense at all), can work behind the scenes in some mysterious, unguided way.  But the Unseen Hand is not allowed to act until the Spirit of Charlie, hovering over the surface of the lavas, shouts: “Come forth!  Emerge!  Arise!  Be fruitful and multiply!”Maybe these reporters think the facts would be pretty boring without the L-word tossed in.  Maybe they want to protect funding for Astrobiology (the science in search of a subject) in spite of bad news like this.  Maybe they’re blind to their own biases.  Whatever it is, they’re funny.last_img read more

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Conversations with leading women in business

first_imgMathiba MolefeThe IAAE Tshwane panel consisted of Khanyi Dhlomo of Ndalo Media, Cynthia Mkhombo of Masana Hygiene and Lindiwe Shibambo of Maid 4 U. The host on the day was Lynette Ntuli, chief executive of Innate Investment Solutions and founder of Ignite SA (from left to right). (Images: Mathiba Molefe)The panel of esteemed speakers at the latest leg of the I Am An Entrepreneur (IAAE) series in Tshwane drew a crowd of aspiring and up and coming business people who were interested in hearing the opinions of the panellists and how they had managed to overcome the challenges of being an entrepreneur.The event’s focus was put firmly on the role that women have to play in developing South Africa’s economy. It touched on some of the challenges they face as well as opportunities available in the competitive and fast-growing field of entrepreneurship.Most of the audience was made up of women looking to hear inspirational stories shared by guests present at Ditsong National Museum of Cultural History in Tshwane’s inner city.The event, held on Saturday, 10 September, was hosted by Lynette Ntuli, a hugely successful entrepreneur and business women in her own right. She was joined on stage by Khanyi Dhlomo of Ndalo Media, Cynthia Mkhombo of Masana Hygiene and Lindiwe Shibambo of Maid 4 U.Representatives from each of the partners Power FM 98.7, MTN Business, the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), Brand South Africa and Renault South Africa were also present to share their thoughts on the subject.“I’m so happy to see so many beautiful, but also brilliant and motivated women out here today with us,” said Linda Sangaret, the chief marketing officer of Brand South Africa.“But I wish to challenge you because I realise that, as women, we fight for so much, but also that all of this cannot be achieved if we don’t have our men fighting along our side.”“If you’re here today ladies, it’s because you know you can play a part in changing our country. You know that you can create jobs and alleviate unemployment.”Most of the audience was made up of women looking to hear inspirational stories shared by guests present at Ditsong National Museum of Cultural History in Tshwane’s inner city.PASSION WITH ACTIONBoth the guest speakers and audience shared the sentiment that even though there is a lot being done to advance women’s involvement in the economy, there is still a way to go for women to properly tap their potential and become drivers of change and development.“As to why this event is so important to me is that I know, as a woman in business, is that our experience of business is slightly different to that of men,” said Ntuli, getting discussions under way.“We need to have our own conversations about our own participation in the economy.”True to the aim of the event, the speakers delved further into issues like getting your business off the ground, the importance of being able to trust those you work with, putting your head down and putting in the hard hours, as well as ways to secure funding from bodies like the IDC.“We all think that everybody is born successful, and that’s not the point,” Ntuli explained. “We’re all on a journey, and part of the journey is introspecting.”The road to being a successful entrepreneur isn’t a straightforward one. It is fraught with challenges and obstacles that make it risky. But a genuine love for what you do and persevering during difficult times is what makes an entrepreneur according to the panel.“Business is not all glamorous and nice. There will be failures, there will be hard times,” explained Shibambo. “Every time you face a failure, you face a challenge or you face a hard time. Always remember the last time you faced them and how you overcame them. Draw strength from that.“There is no way that in life or in business that everything is going to be smooth and nice. That is a lie.”The event also afforded members of the audience a chance to interact with the panel that consisted of some of the country’s leading women in business.MAKE IT HAPPENOne of the event’s other aims was to reassure those who had fledgling careers in business or were in the early stages of starting their own businesses to continue striving for greatness and have faith in their ability to make a difference in South Africa.Speakers also encouraged people, women in particular, to start their own businesses and take advantage of investors looking to harness their great potential.“What would you do if you were not afraid,” asked Naomi Mtshali of the IDC. “Why are you not doing it? What is stopping you?”PLAY YOUR PARTAre you playing your part to help improve the lives of those around you through business? Do you know of any business person who has gone out of their way to help improve South Africa and its people?If so, submit your story or video to our website and let us know what you are doing to improve the country for all.last_img read more

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