Sharks pass ‘big test’ with top grades: ‘we’re one of the favorites’

first_imgNASHVILLE, Tenn. — The game lived up to the hype.Two Stanley Cup favorites, the Sharks (5-3-1) and the Nashville Predators (7-2), slugging it out for 60 minutes in a see-saw game decided in the late stages of the third period.With the likes of Erik Karlsson, P.K. Subban and Brent Burns on the ice, Brenden Dillon scored the pivotal goal, going end-to-end on the penalty kill, triggering flashbacks of another No. 4 — Bobby Orr — as he jumpstarted the Sharks come-from-behind victory.Here’s what …last_img

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Oscar Pistorius’s advocate: Barry Roux

first_imgAdvocate Barry Roux is representing Oscar Pistorius in his murder trial. (Image: Graphic by Mary Alexander. Background image courtesy of Jonny Ross, Flickr) • South Africa’s justice system • Oscar and the photo of the witness • Pistorius trial: open justice or trial by media? • A media guide to the Oscar Pistorius trial • The media and open justiceLucille DavieParalympian Oscar Pistorius, in court for allegedly murdering his girlfriend of four months, Reeva Steenkamp, on 14 February 2013, is represented by senior council Barry Roux.Roux, an advocate for more than 30 years, is a formidable legal eagle, known for wearing witnesses down. In Pistorius’s bail application in the weeks after the Steenkamp’s death, Roux grilled police detective, Hilton Botha, who cracked under relentless questioning, admitting that his facts were doubtful, and that Pistorius would not be a flight risk. Pistorius’s bail was secured at R1-million and Roux convinced the court to relax some of its strict bail conditions a month later.The first witness to be called in the Pistorius trial, Michelle Burger, took the stand for a day and a half, and withstood repeated grilling by Roux, bravely sticking to her story under pressure. Subsequent witnesses have endured his persistent questioning, with Pistorius’s former girlfriend, Samantha Taylor, breaking down in tears twice during her testimony, with the court having to have a recess to allow her to recover.Roux was admitted to the Bar in 1982. His practice comprises criminal, insurance, delictual, aviation, matrimonial, medical negligence, general contractual and liquidation work.He has had some high profile clients, defending South Africa-based businessman, Dave King, who had had the highest unpaid tax bill ever, at R2.3-billion. The bill was reduced to R700-million. Roux also represented Johannesburg Consolidated Investments chairman, Brett Kebble, now deceased, on charges of tax evasion. The charges were withdrawn in 2007.Mannie Witz, an advocate with the Bridge Group at the Johannesburg Bar, says of Roux: “He is a very experienced criminal lawyer, and quite a likeable fellow.” Witz says he has worked with Roux over the past 35 years. Roux has been a South African Police Services advocate for many years, and still takes on the bigger criminal cases for them. “He is very, very professional, and very competent,” adds Witz.Roux is a hardworking but private person, says Witz, and a gentleman and a family man. “He is always very well prepared, and a very decent guy.”Roux is a member of the Advocates Group 21, a professional body of 101 advocates who practise in the High Courts and other courts of South Africa and neighbouring countries.“Our members are committed to the highest standards of a professional and ethical legal practice, and are equally committed to transformation initiatives internally, and at the Johannesburg Bar, to ensure that the practice remains highly esteemed and legitimate,” indicates the organisation’s website.Members of the group practise in all the fields of law traditionally dealt with by advocates, including constitutional law and human rights, labour law, criminal law, matrimonial matters, banking law, company law, liquidations, aviation law and intellectual property. Services rendered include litigation, mediation and arbitration, attending enquiries and commissions, and appearing in all forums generally permitted by the rules of conduct set by the Bar, including as the presiding officials at hearings.“The Group has actively sought to transform the bar and to help redress the imbalances of the past. It has a dedicated fund aimed at ensuring that new and previously disadvantaged members get access to quality work and clients.”last_img read more

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La Vogue Women Small Sinamay Fascinators Feather Flowers Hair Clip Bridal – Brought for my sisters wedding – lovely item and at

first_imgBest accurately what i required exceptional benefit for cash. Introduced for my sisters wedding day – charming item and at. Brought for my sisters wedding – attractive merchandise and at a fraction of the charge of some in large st outlets. This was accurately what i was on the lookout for. S a bit of exciting it will trigger a giggle when i put on it.Wonderful and so low-cost perfectly packed on delivery quite delighted with this solution.Clip is less complicated to use than a comb.Just what i needed to compliment my outfit. Arrived earlier than anticipated. Color and sizing real to photo.Clip is less complicated to use than a comb.Took a when to arrive so i had to get. Took a when to get there so i experienced to order elsewhere. Won’t be able to be faulted when it arrived.Delightful small navy fascinator. . A small fascinator, just like the photograph and specifically what i desired. It came in a air crammed pouch to defend it in the write-up. I will be maintaining it this way until the wedding day in september.Just what i needed to compliment my outfit. Arrived earlier than anticipated. Color and sizing real to photo.Took a when to arrive so i had to get. Took a when to get there so i experienced to order elsewhere. Won’t be able to be faulted when it arrived.Wonderful and so low-cost perfectly packed on delivery quite delighted with this solution. Delightful small navy fascinator. . A small fascinator, just like the photograph and specifically what i desired. It came in a air crammed pouch to defend it in the write-up. I will be maintaining it this way until the wedding day in september.Here are the specifications for the La Vogue Women Small Sinamay Fascinators Feather Flowers Hair Clip Bridal:Material:cambric+feather+metal buckleSize:19*10*6cmThis fascinator hat has beautiful flowers, and feathers.It is easy to wear with a clip to secure to the hair.Wear it to parties, weddings, Christmas, new years eve, derby and Easter Introduced for my sisters wedding day – charming item and at. Brought for my sisters wedding – attractive merchandise and at a fraction of the charge of some in large st outlets.Best accurately what i required exceptional benefit for cash.Reviews from purchasers :Delightful small navy fascinator.Brought for my sisters wedding – lovely item and at Took a while to arrive so I had to order last_img read more

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Do the “12 Days of Christmas” birds live in Ohio?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the holiday song “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” someone’s true love gives them … quite a few birds.Given that the song has European roots — it apparently came from France and was published first in England — does it hold up ornithologically in Ohio?Do the song’s birds live in the Buckeye State?Here are answers from experts in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences(CFAES) at The Ohio State University and from sources including The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Ohio, which was published earlier this year.1st day: Partridge (with or without pear tree)ANSWER: Technically, no. But also, not any more.The ruffed grouse, which is pictured below, although in a willow tree, lives in Ohio. And people sometimes call it a “partridge.” But scientists say that name is inaccurate.While both grouse and partridges belong to the Phasianidae family — which includes pheasants, chickens and others — they’re actually members of two different subfamilies: Grouse are in Tetraoninae; partridges, in Perdicinae.Members of the Partridge Family, meanwhile, included David Cassidy, Susan Dey and Danny Bonaduce.Ohio, in fact, had partridges once. In the 1900s, game officials started releasing non-native gray, or Hungarian, partridges in the state, hoping they’d survive, settle down and raise families.It worked. Ohio’s gray partridge numbers grew. But then starting in the 1940s they crashed, apparently due mostly to changing farm practices. Today, scientists consider gray partridges extirpated — completely gone — within Ohio.Stray gray partridges — plus another non-native partridge, the chukar — still are seen sometimes. But they’re usually escapees. They’re from game farms, say, or from a landowner stocking them for hunting.Pear production in the Midwest, including Ohio, is “greatly limited by fire blight, a bacterial disease, and occasional spring frosts,” says the college’s Midwest Home Fruit Production Guide.2nd day: Turtle-dovesANSWER: Not exactly. But a kissing cousin just moved in.The non-native, adaptable Eurasian collared-dove, Streptopelia decaocto (pictured), arrived in Ohio about 10 years ago, is breeding and spreading — it’s been reported nesting in Holmes, Mercer, Logan and Fulton counties, among others — and is a near dead-ringer for the closely related ringed turtle-dove.The ringed turtle-dove is a domesticated — pet or cage bird — form of the wild African collared-dove, Streptopelia roseogrisea.The Eurasian collared-dove is native to parts of Asia and Europe but has colonized places like Egypt, North Africa, the Bahamas and even the Arctic Circle, and also many U.S. states.According to The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Ohio, the Eurasian collared-dove “seems likely to become a permanent member of the North American avifauna.”3rd day: French hensANSWER: Yes. But in coops and runs, not the wild.The Meyer Hatchery in Polk, Ohio, sells, among others, baby chickens of two French breeds, Marans and Faverolles (pictured). Specifically, it offers White Marans, Blue Splash Marans, Blue Copper Marans, Black Copper Marans, Cuckoo Marans, Golden Cuckoo Marans and Salmon Faverolles.Mt. Healthy Hatcheries in Cincinnati, Ohio, also sells Cuckoo Marans chicks.Chicken people consider Marans and Faverolles good dual-purpose breeds, suited to both meat and egg production. Marans hens are noted for their chocolate-colored eggs.Both breeds were named for the French towns from which they originated.And both breeds can make it as Buckeyes. “Given the proper care — diet and environment — it’s possible to raise any chicken in Ohio,” said Mike Lilburn, poultry science professor in the college’s Department of Animal Sciences.4th day: Calling birdsANSWER: In one way, no. In other ways, kinda sorta.Early versions of the lyrics used the term “colly birds,” not “calling birds,” according to the song’s Wikipedia entry. “Colly” means sooty or black. It’s thought that the reference is to the common, or Eurasian, blackbird.Ironically, the common blackbird isn’t a blackbird at all but a thrush. It’s a close relative of the American robin (pictured), which lives in Ohio and throughout North America. Except for their color — black vs. gray with the famous red breast — the two are a lot alike.While common blackbirds sometimes, rarely, wander westward over the Atlantic, they’ve never quite made it to Ohio. The closest is parts of Canada.Ohio’s true “colly birds” include the abundant and widespread red-winged blackbird and the rare and limited — at least in the Buckeye State — yellow-headed blackbird.6th day: GeeseANSWER: Yes. In a big (ahem) honking way.The Canada goose (pictured), and specifically the subspecies called the giant Canada goose, nests in every county in Ohio. Its numbers are booming thanks to more and more goose-friendly, people-created habitat — specifically, ponds surrounded by lawns on golf courses, in office parks, in condo complexes and so on.“It’s one of the species I get a lot of questions about,” said Marne Titchenell, a wildlife program specialist with CFAES. “They’re right up there with deer and coyotes on the list of species that frequently become a nuisance.”Problems include Canada geese eating and damaging lawns, hissing at and charging people during the spring nesting season, and delivering lots of “presents,” and not just on Christmas Eve.There’s even a fact sheet about the matter. CFAES’s “Coping with Canada Geese: Conflict Management and Damage Prevention Strategies” is free at ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/W-3.But it’s a success story in wildlife management, too, Titchenell said.“There was a time when a honking V of flying geese overhead stopped people in their tracks. It was a rare sight, and nesting geese within the state were virtually nonexistent,” she said.Then in the 1950s, wildlife managers reintroduced Canada geese to some of Ohio’s wetlands. Coupled with state and federal protections, increases in habitat, and the birds’ adaptive nature, the “geese rebounded very quickly,” Titchenell said.“They can sometimes become a problem,” she said. “But they’re a constant reminder that we’re capable of helping a species in serious decline recover — and recover well.”7th day: SwansANSWER: Yes. And rather not unswimmingly.Twenty years ago, wildlife managers began efforts to restore trumpeter swans (pictured) to Ohio. Today, though officially listed as “Threatened,” the large, tooting waterbirds are breeding successfully and are “advancing toward a sustainable population,” according to The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Ohio.Mute swans aren’t native to Ohio; they’re from Europe. They’re sometimes kept in zoos and on farms. And sometimes they escape. “Naturalized populations are increasing and are now an ecological concern around the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic states,” the atlas also says.Mute swan issues include overgrazing wetland plants, badgering other waterbirds — including trumpeter swans, for instance — and even attacking people.Another swan, the tundra swan, migrates through Ohio, especially the northeastern part, during its spring and fall migrations, including in early December.All the birds nesting in OhioThe Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Ohio (600 pp., $45.47) is available from Penn State University Press at go.osu.edu/BreedingBirdAtlas. Preparing the book involved, among others, about 1,000 birdwatching volunteers and a number of faculty, staff and students with CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, including, at various times, four of the book’s editors.A caveat: The federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act protects many wild birds from, among other things, being proffered by the lovestruck at Yuletide.last_img read more

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Arrrrrrr you fan of Pirates? — Nashuan’s First Cache (GC1D56C) — Geocache of the Week

first_imgA happy mini-cacher making the find. Photo by geocacher Fee&meGeocaching can be a bit like searching for hidden treasure. For instance, just like having an X on a map, we have satellites that tell us exactly where the “booty” is hidden. And just like a treasure chest filled with gold doubloons, we have ammo cans that are filled with…Well maybe that’s a bad analogy. Anyway, it’s no secret that geocachers have a certain affinity for seafaring, treasure-hunting, patch-and-parrot-adorned pirates—so finding a pirate-themed geocache like this week’s Geocache of the Week should be on every geocacher’s to-do list.Geocacher Nashuan‘s first geocache, creatively named Nashuan’s First Cache (GC1D56C), is an extraordinary pirate-themed geocache located in New Hampshire, USA. While this is a two-stage multi-cache, the difficulty and terrain ratings are only 1.5, so the journey shouldn’t be too taxing. However, be sure to pay attention to the geocache description—without it, you’ll be left locked out of the geocache.The pirates trying to figure out how to access the booty. Photo by Frau PotterOnce you’ve arrived at the final location and unlocked the final stage, this geocache shows the true reason why it’s being awarded Geocache of the Week. You unveil the scene of, “Captain Jack, his first mate Arthur and his second mate Nate in the dungeon of the Castle Waltraud; trying to get into the treasure room in search of gold doubloon sig. item coins that they can use to place in caches throughout the area.” The scene is complete with a goblet that tilts down to reveal travel bugs and a leather-bound logbook.The geocachers who have earned their smiley on this geocache agree: the craftsmanship and creativity that went into creating this geocache is incredible. In a recent trip to the area, Geocaching HQ staffer Frau Potter had the opportunity to find this geocache. In her log, she writes, “Wow! I have found many geocaches. This one is near the top of the heap. The kids were delighted since they are often disappointed that other geocaches don’t have “treasure”. It was a dream come true to find the “x” marks the spot. Thanks to the cache owner got the great effort it took to construct and maintain this one. You sure set a high standard for others.”For a closer look at the geocache and how it was made, check out this video Nashuan made of the creation process:  (Warning: Spoiler Alert)We’re continually blown away by geocachers who push the limits of creativity with the geocaches they publish. What geocacher has hidden geocaches that totally blow your mind? Let us know in the comments.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to [email protected] with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedCelebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day — Pirate’s Quest Stolen Treasure (GC28T4Y) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 18, 2013In “Community”When a geocache is more like a theme park. — Dead Men Tell No Tales (GC46ZT4) — Geocache of the WeekJanuary 29, 2014In “Community”Geocaching with Zorro – A Literary ChallengeMarch 21, 2012In “Community”last_img read more

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Long Live Marginalia! ReadSocial Brings Annotations to Digital Literature

first_imgTags:#E-Books#web Close Reading 2.0My background in literature, I’ll admit, makes me pretty excited about the prospects of this API, and the founders of ReadSocial – Aaron Miller and Travis Alber – share that literary background too. The two are also the co-founders of BookGlutton, and the idea for the ReadSocial API stems in part from their work there, making online reading more social.Of course, thanks to Web 2.0, much of the reading that we do online has become social, in some way or another. We can share links to articles. We can leave comments. But those comments come at the end of an article or blog post, which arguably means you get quite a different sort of response than you would if you could offer your thoughts in the margins throughout. Being able to read a text closely, point to a key place in an argument, and offer your insights is one of the cornerstones of literary criticism, and it’s the motivation in many ways for marginalia. The ReadSocial API has great potential to bring this longstanding tradition of close reading online. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A rather grim story in The New York Times last month posited that our move to digital literature would spell the end of marginalia, the notes and comments that we scribble in the margins of printed books. How would we know what snarky comments Mark Twain left in the margins of his library had he only read books on his Kindle?I’m not sure that the future of marginalia is quite so dim. Nor do the folks at ReadSocial, who are working on an API that would, as the name suggests, help open up our digital annotations to others and help make e-reading social.ReadSocial’s API aims to provide a social layer that works on top of and across reading systems. In other words, it means that passages from books, magazines, newspapers, blogs, and so on can be excerpted, annotated, and pushed to our social networks. The API would serve to free content and discussions from being siloed in a single platformSay, for instance, I am reading an e-book on my Kindle, but I want to share my annotations with someone who’s reading that same book on a Nook? How can we compare notes? (Well, we can’t – and that’s the problem that ReadSocial is addressing.)Making Notes in the Margins of the Google Books LibraryReadSocial has developed a proof-of-concept project that uses Google Books and Facebook to demonstrate how this can work. It’s called Readum, a Firefox and Chrome extension that lets you highlight any passage from a Google Book, attach a note, and then share it to Facebook – to your wall or to a Facebook group. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… audrey watterslast_img read more

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