IFA President – “We could be heading for a crisis in the sector”

first_imgJoe Healy made his first official visit last week to Donegal since he was elected President of the IFA in March.He visited farms in the South-West of the county in Ballintra and Dunkineely were farmers are finding it near impossible to cut silage or graze cattle due to water logged fields.“The situation is very bad in many parts of Donegal at the moment and the reality is that unless we see some drier weather, we could be heading for a crisis in the sector,” said Mr Healy. He added: “I am concerned about the number of farmers who are having to house cattle at this time of the year. However, I can see for myself that ground conditions are so bad, it’s just not possible to let them out.”“If the weather doesn’t improve, this is going to be a major issue. It is placing enormous strain on many of our members at a time when they are already being impacted by poor prices and rising overheads,” Joe Healy said.Mr Healy was joined on the visits by local farmers and IFA officers along with Donegal Chairman, Michael Chance who stated: “The President has been very receptive to concerns about the impact ground conditions are having on a number of farms in the county. I brought the situation in Donegal to his attention on Monday and he immediately made plans to be in the county this week. That is very encouraging to see and hopefully will result in positive supports being put in place for farmers in the county.”Mr Chance said it was also important to consider the mental impact of the current plight of struggling farmers. It’s easy sometimes to cope with single issues but when there’s a combination of issues it can put farmers under extreme pressure. You have to consider the impact that is having on people’s mental health. It’s a very difficult situation to be in.” IFA President – “We could be heading for a crisis in the sector” was last modified: September 5th, 2016 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:farmersIFAJoe Healywater loggedlast_img read more

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Guardiola ‘wants a face-to-face meeting with Roman Abramovich’

first_imgThe Sun say Pep Guardiola wants a face-to-face meeting with Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich before deciding whether to take over as manager at Stamford Bridge.Chelsea officials are said to have offered the ex-Barcelona boss £11m-a-year and an assurance that there will be no pressure on him to win major trophies in his first two years in charge.But it is claimed that Guardiola has demanded talks with Abramovich himself, so he can hear the offer from the horse’s mouth.A Chelsea source is quoted as saying: “If it takes a big meeting with Abramovich to get the deal done, that’s what must happen.”The Daily Express say Chelsea have made a £30m offer for Hulk, while The Daily Telegraph suggest the Blues are on the verge of signing the Porto striker for £40m.QPR want Newcastle defender Danny Simpson and are willing to pay West Ham keeper Robert Green £50,000-a-week, The Sun report.Magpies full-back Simpson has so far not agreed a new deal at St James’ Park, while Green’s contract expires this summer.It’s suggested that Rangers’ willingness to match Green’s wage demands are scuppering West Ham’s attempts to keep the England international.Arsenal are rivalling QPR for the signing of Manchester City midfielder Nigel De Jong, according to the Daily Mirror.Rangers boss Mark Hughes has been linked with the Dutchman, who played under him at Eastlands.And it is claimed that Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger is also keen to capture De Jong after failing to land Rennes’ Yann M’Vila.Click here for Wednesday’s QPR quizClick here for Wednesday’s Chelsea quizClick here for Tuesday’s Paper TalkFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Vredefort warns of future impacts

first_img16 August 2005“Four minutes that literally shook the world resulted in the creation of an enormous impact crater,” says Prof Uwe Reimold, professor of Mineralogy in the School of Geosciences at Wits University. “The meteorite that crashed into the earth near Vredefort in the Free State is the single greatest geological catastrophe yet uncovered on our planet.”Meteorite Impact! The Danger from Space is a new book on the Vredefort impact co-authored by Reimold and Prof Roger Gibson. The book explains how the lessons learned from the rocks around Vredefort are being used throughout the world to teach a new generation of scientists of the reality, and danger, of similar events in the future.“The book reviews more than 200 000 years of human habitation in this area of exceptional natural beauty and biodiversity,” says Reimold. The impact area, known as the Vredefort Dome, was awarded Unesco World Heritage status in July.“This history starts with the early San hunters, whose graceful art survives today on rocks formed during the impact event. The successive settlements of Sotho-Tswana, Afrikaner and British farmers are discussed, including the landmark wars that affected the region over the last three centuries.“The book also documents the rich geological, archaeological, cultural and botanical heritage presented by the Vredefort region, opening up the information to non-geoscientists. It concludes with a guide to more than 20 sites that highlight the heritage of this area, a World Heritage Site,” Reimold says.Bigger than the dinosaur killerThe Vredefort structure is the oldest and largest visible meteor impact crater in the world. At about 300km it diameter it is nearly twice the size of the Chicxulub crater, formed by the meteor impact that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs.“The Chicxulub impact wiped out approximately 75% of all known life on Earth 65 million years ago,” says Reimold.“In the more than 2 000 million years since the formation of the Vredefort structure, water, wind and ice have slowly eroded away the original crater, exposing its roots in a series of spectacular rocks.“The outcroppings in the region around the towns of Vredefort and Parys, known as the Vredefort Dome, show the scars of the cataclysmic forces that accompanied the impact event.“The rocks, ripped from the depths of the crust by the impact, also tell a far older story that stretches back to more than 3 500 million years ago, when the first continents formed on the primitive Earth, and to the time when fabulous gold deposits accumulated on the margins of the ancient Witwatersrand sea.” Meteorite Impact! The Danger from Space and South Africa’s Mega-Impact, the Vredefort Structure by WU Reimold and RL Gibson. ISBN 1-919908-62-5. Contact Chris van Rensburg Publications on +27 11 726 4350 or visit the Johannesburg Planetarium. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Photo library: Countryside 23

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province:Sugarcane Fields in the north coast region.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goat on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res imageCOUNTRYSIDE 23: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

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SA partners with global water experts

first_img6 May 2011 The Department of Water Affairs has forged a partnership with the Water Resources Group, an influential public-private global network on water supported by the World Economic Forum and the International Finance Corporation, to address critical water issues in South Africa. The declaration of partnership was announced at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town on Wednesday by Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa, and Nestle chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, who also chairs the Water Resources Group. A new public-private expert leadership group, chaired by the Department of Water Affairs director-general, will be formed to oversee the activities of a partnership called “South Africa Strategic Water Partners Network” to address water conservation, demand management and developing more sustainable management of groundwater resources in SA. The partnership “will help identify how South Africa’s plans for growth can be met with the water it has safely available,” said Brabeck-Letmathe. “The foresight and leadership of Minister Molewa in this regard should be applauded.” Managing the supply, demand gap In South Africa, water demand is expected to rise by 52% within the next 30 years while the supply of water is sharply declining. If current trends of leakage from aged and poorly maintained municipal infrastructure and the loss of wetlands persist, this growth in demand will intensify competition for water resources across all sectors of the economy. Should the status quo in management practices remain, a gap of 17% between water demand and supply is forecast by 2030. This gap would have serious social and political implications and strongly affect South Africa economic growth. The Water Resources Group partnership “will enable South Africa to access best practice economics, projects and policies in water management from public, private and civil society sectors around the world, enabling officials to field-test and replicate actions for implementation domestically,” said Dominic Waughray of the World Economic Forum, a member of the Water Resources Group.Increased efficiency, diversification The group will focus on increasing water use efficiency in South African agriculture, industry and households, while reducing leakage from municipal and other distribution networks. At the same time, it will look at diversifying South Africa’s water mix by increasing the re-use of effluent and desalination, and developing more sustainable management of groundwater resources. The group will help the government develop water strategies for different sectors, identify and help design projects for implementing each strategy, and develop public-private expert collaborations to take the pilot projects forward. The Water Resources Group, a public-private platform for collaboration, engages with those governments who invite it to work on a comprehensive water sector reform strategy, then provides a public-private approach to support them. Key partners of the Water Resources Group include the Coca-Cola Company, the International Finance Corporation, Nestle, PepsiCo, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, and Veolia Environment. Source: World Economic Forumlast_img read more

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Fungicide applications to late planted crops

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By John Schoenhals, Pioneer Field Agronomist in northern OhioFungicide applications to corn and soybeans is an important management practice in an “average” year, but what about in 2019, a yearJohn Schoenhals, Pioneer Field Agronomist in northern Ohioin which many corn and soybean acres were planted much later than normal? To answer this question, it is important to understand the role and function of fungicides.Leaves serve as a “factory” for the plant, collecting sunlight and carbon dioxide to produce sugars used for grainfill. Healthy leaves produce sufficient amounts of sugars to meet grainfill needs as well as support plant health.When plant diseases are present, the efficiency of this factory is reduced. If the demand for sugars is greater than what an unhealthy plant can produce, grain yield is reduced and overall plant health will rapidly decline as cannibalization of stalks takes place.When fungicide applications occur, the leaf “factory” is protected from further disease development for a period of at least two to three weeks. Fungicides don’t necessarily add bushels; rather, fungicides preserve yield potential, protecting against yield loss due to diseases. In addition, fungicides can improve harvest standability by allowing plants to remain healthy and not cannibalize stalks at the end of the season.The two corn diseases that consistently pose the greatest risk in Ohio are gray leaf spot (GLS) and northern corn leaf blight (NCLB). These diseases overwinter in residue, which provide a new source of infection every year. Other potential diseases include southern rust, when storm systems blow spores from the south, and tar spot, a relatively new disease found in northwest Ohio in 2018. Tar spot can survive in residue and likely will become a disease of increasing importance in Ohio.When considering fungicide applications to corn, scout fields to get a sense of what is already taking place. Since common pathogens survive in corn residue, no-till systems and corn-on-corn situations will be higher risk areas. In addition, determine the disease ratings of the corn hybrids you have planted, especially for GLS and NCLB. Hybrids with low resistance scores should be prioritized for fungicide applications. Most companies do not yet have scores for tar spot, but your seed supplier may be able to help you with management considerations.The ideal time to apply fungicides to corn for maximum protection is near tasseling/silking (VT/R1). Carefully read product labels, as the use of adjuvants may cause crop and ear damage. For soybeans, applications at the R3 stage, beginning pod development, will provide the best results.Pioneer has conducted over 1,400 on-farm corn fungicide trials since 2007. These studies have shown an average 8.3-bushel per acre increase in corn yields when fungicides are used, with a positive yield response 82% of the time. In soybeans, a fungicide and insecticide application has been shown to average a 5.3-bushel per acre response, with 94% positive yield results.So, with all that in mind, should fungicide applications be made to late-planted corn? As with many things, the best answer is “it depends.” Late planting means grainfill will extend through September and into October. Disease pressure is expected to be more severe due to moderate temperatures, heavy dews, and plenty of disease inoculum building throughout the season.In cases where later-planted corn has high yield potential, and especially if susceptible hybrids were planted and disease is already present, fungicide applications at the proper time will be expected to provide a positive economic response both in terms of yield and stalk quality/standability.In some cases, fungicides result in higher harvest moisture, due to improved plant health preventing premature plant death. Across Pioneer fungicide trials, fungicide resulted in an average grain moisture only 0.39% wetter than untreated. Even if moisture is greater this year due to late maturity of the crop, there are still expected advantages to fungicide applications.While 2019 continues to provide plenty of challenges for Ohio growers, well-planned fungicide applications should still be considered as part of an overall management plan for both corn and soybeans.last_img read more

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