What we’re reading: Images show North Korean nuclear activity, bystanders testify in Chauvin trial

first_imgCaroline Fisher Commuters watch a TV showing a file image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Joe Biden during a news program at the Suseo Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday. March 26, 2021. North Korea on Friday confirmed it had tested a new guided missile, as Biden warned of consequences if Pyongyang escalates tensions amid stalled nuclear negotiations. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Previous articleHoroscope: March 31, 2021Next articleWhat we’re reading: Pfizer vaccine shows effectiveness in teens, Biden unveils infrastructure plan Caroline Fisher RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin What we’re reading: Ron Wright dies due to COVID-19, Trump’s second impeachment trial begins printSatellite detects activity at one of North Korea’s nuclear power plantsNew images are showing activity at North Korea’s nuclear facility, indicating they are preparing or have already started to process nuclear weapons, according to NBC News. Satellite photos show “steam or smoke rising” from a laboratory that “extracts plutonium from nuclear bombs.”The images follow previous signs of activity at these power plants in recent weeks.Images purportedly showing nuclear activity. (Maxar Technologies/CNN)Victor Cha, a former national security official, claims that North Korea’s actions are “calculated” and that they are “ratcheting up pressure as they had done to President Trump and President Obama.” Michael Studeman, director of intelligence for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, claims the government has an “eye on this”, and if North Korea starts reprocessing that it will cause tension. Day two of Derek Chauvin’s trial Demonstrators hold signs during a news conference outside the Hennepin County Government Center, Monday, March 29, 2021, in Minneapolis where the trial for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin began with opening statements from both sides. Chauvin is charged with murder in the death of George Floyd during an arrest last May in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)On day two of Derek Chauvin’s trial for the murder of George Floyd, six people testified including a nine-year-old girl, a firefighter and a high schooler. They were brought to the stands to explain their personal experience of watching Floyd’s death. The firefighter, Genevieve Hanson, stated that she asked police officer’s to check for a pulse, but they refused. Hanson was the third phone call to 911 that evening to report what she had seen, according to CNN. Another bystander who took the video of the incident that went viral said that she saw her own relatives in Floyd. Lawyers for Chauvin have argued that the incident is more than just he video. Nike sues MSCHF over shoe in Lil Nas X music video Nike is suing Brooklyn art collective MSCHF because of a pair of shoes advertised by Lil Nas X that contained human blood, an inverted cross, a pentagram and the words “Luke 10:18,” according to BBC News. The shoe that was used was a Nike Air Max 97 and Nike says this constitutes “trademark infringement.”Nike says they never approved of the the “customized Satan Shoes.” + posts Twitter Caroline Fisherhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/caroline-fisher/ What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Caroline Fisherhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/caroline-fisher/center_img Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature ReddIt Twitter Facebook Linkedin ReddIt Fort Worth Botanic Garden postpones ‘Valentine’s in the garden’ event Facebook Popular karaoke bar Poop Deck plans relocation to Bluebonnet Circle Caroline Fisherhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/caroline-fisher/last_img read more

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The low-down on the upcoming 2008 ABIM Forum

first_imgThe Association of Bakery Ingredient Manufacturers (ABIM) 2008 Forum, Growing A Sustainable Bakery Industry, is to take place on 6 June at the Devonshire Arms Country House Hotel, Bolton Abbey, Skipton. The event will start with a buffet lunch and networking opportunity, followed by a programme of talks in the afternoon. Ed Garner from TNS Worldwide Panel will be discussing ‘Who is the “health conscious UK consumer?”, looking at the health conscious buying habits of UK consumers, and what the future might hold for the baking industry.Matthew May from the Alliance for Bakery Students and Trainees will be discussing what the perspective of bakery students and trainees is, and what the industry’s needs are for the future in terms of education and training.Improve Ltd will be looking at the current skills, challenges and opportunities available in the industry, and what can be done to address skills gaps. Other guest speakers include Alette Addison from the Food Standards Agency, and Dr Wayne Martindale from the Food Innovation Centre, Sheffield Hallam University.For more information or to register please contact Anne Boyd, ABIM on 0207 420 7102 or email [email protected]last_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers

first_imgPlainfield Township officials have approved zoning to protect their 1½-mile section of the Appalachian Trail. It will prevent projects like natural gas pipelines, wind turbines, solar panels, and cellphone towers from being located near the scenic footpath. The Truth About Recycling: Why Recycling has stopped in many places in the U.S. The global recycling system wasn’t ever perfectly eco-friendly. Recycling operators had been known to illegally burn or bury recycling waste, causing a ripple effect of pollution including contaminated water, killed crops, respiratory illnesses, and long-lasting negative impacts on the environment overall. What happens to the waste we think we’re recycling? For decades, many countries, including us, send plastic waste to China and Southeast Asia for recycling. But just last year, China and many other Asian countries, banned the import due to the overwhelming amount they already had, according to the Business Insider. This has tragically lead to burning and landfills in many of our major cities. center_img Protection for the A.T. from pipelines and cellphone towers The Morning Call reported that The Appalachian Trail Conservancy provided a $16,900 grant covering the cost of a consultant from the Bethlehem-based Urban Research and Development Corp. to draft an ordinance with the township. The ordinance includes guidelines for controlling light pollution, the withdraw of groundwater, digital signs, noise, commercial outdoor recreation, residential developments, solar panels, natural gas pipelines and wind turbines.last_img read more

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ESG roundup: UK schemes challenged on climate risk action

first_imgA spokesman for ShareAction said at least 24 schemes had been contacted through the campaign, including public and corporate schemes, and both defined benefit and defined contribution funds.The oil and gas companies will this year hold three-year binding votes on pay policy.The letters argued that the pay policies Shell and BP were proposing did not incentivise business activity compatible with keeping global warming to less than 2°C, which could put shareholder value at risk in the long term.LGPS funds urged to up the ante on investment climate risk Separately, ClientEarth and ShareAction have analysed newly published ‘investment strategy statements’ (ISS) from local government pension scheme (LGPS) funds, and found that more than 80% did not mention climate risk.The analysis came after the organisations contacted The Pensions Regulator in February highlighting varying standards across the LGPS funds in terms of how they were assessing and managing climate risk in their decision-making. The two organisations argued that funds must address climate risk specifically in their investment strategies as climate change posed systemic risks likely to affect a fund’s whole portfolio. They said they would continue to monitor “laggard funds” and might take further regulatory action. Catherine Howarth, CEO of ShareAction, said many LGPS funds were “operating under a number of misconceptions, including legal ones”.“This is not fair on pension holders,” she said. “Members’ savings should be protected across the board from the very real and emergent risks of climate change.”Don’t relax on climate change action, investors urge leadersMore than 200 global institutional investors have called on the heads of state of major world economies to drive investment in low carbon assets and implement climate-related financial reporting frameworks.Overarching these demands was a call for the G7 and G20 leaders to stick with and swiftly implement their commitments to the Paris Agreement on climate change.G20 leaders failed to reference climate change, climate finance, and climate adaptation in an official statement following a meeting of these countries’ finance ministers in March this year. Pressure from the US was reportedly behind the omission of a stated commitment to climate action.In this week’s letter to G7 and G20 government leaders, investors urged global leaders to commit to supporting a doubling of global investment in low carbon assets in developed and developing countries by 2020 and to include carbon pricing in climate-energy action plans.On climate-related financial reporting frameworks, the investors called on political leaders to “clarify the purview of national financial regulators to explicitly mandate, enforce, and evaluate” the quality of climate-related financial disclosures in alignment with the recommendations from the Financial Stability Board (FSB) Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD).More specifically, national financial regulators should develop mechanisms to monitor whether company and investor disclosures, and national reporting rules, are aligned with the task force’s recommendations. National regulators should provide annual progress reports to the FSB, according to the investors.The letter was coordinated by several investor organisations, including the Institutional Investor Group on Climate Change (IIGCC) and the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI).Actiam cuts back on coal investmentsElsewhere, the €55bn Dutch asset manager Actiam has said it would divest from companies with a turnover of more than 15% derived from coal production.As a consequence, the manager – a subsidiary of Vivat/Anbang – said it would sell its holdings in 10 emerging market firms, adding that it would publish the companies’ names at a later stage.It said that its entire investment portfolio, including its index products, were subject to the exclusion decision.Actiam’s pension fund clients include the €20bn Vervoer, the sector scheme for private road transport in the Netherlands. UK pension savers have written to schemes such as The Pensions Trust and the Universities Superannuation Scheme urging them to engage with asset managers about voting against the remuneration policies of Royal Dutch Shell and BP.The letters were addressed to trustees and other relevant decision-makers and outline potential liability if they don’t take action.The letter writing campaign was supported by responsible investment campaign organisation ShareAction and environmental law charity ClientEarth.ClientEarth CEO James Thornton said: “ClientEarth is supporting these members to make full use of the law to protect their rights. We’ll be watching how pension funds vote on these remuneration policies, and will be ready to take action where necessary.”last_img read more

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