No human dignity in killing or being killed

first_imgStuff co.nz 17 August 2018Family First Comment: Well said, Carolyn (who also writes for Mercatornet) “‘Finishing people off’ may suit our current individualistic, utilitarian, impatient culture, but it will degrade us all in the end.”www.Protect.org.nzTo ask ‘Should Kiwis have a right to die with dignity?’ demonstrates exactly what is wrong with the framing of this discussion by euthanasia activists, pollsters and the media.Of course Kiwis should be able to die in circumstances consistent with their intrinsic human dignity.The proper question is: Should Kiwis have the legal ‘right’ to be put to death when they are terminally ill – or for any other reason such as severe disability or hopelessness? Is this consistent with human dignity?The answer is no. To kill oneself is not consistent with human dignity, and neither is it for someone else to kill you. There cannot be a ‘right’ in the proper sense of the term (something essential to human dignity) to have someone end your life, as official euthanasia regimes require.To define euthanasia as a right is to put upon the state the duty to provide people to kill you. This is an abuse of state power.And, as with abortion, there will be pressure on doctors who refuse to do this to at least refer people requesting euthanasia to a doctor who will give the lethal injection. There will be pressure on care homes and hospices to allow such terminations despite it going against their own ethos. Those who object will ultimately be forced out of their profession.Nine years ago today my 78-year-old sister died peacefully after living for more than 50 years with Parkinson’s disease, and after 6 years in rest home/nursing home care. During the last three years she was visited every day and helped with her main meal. The last 8 months she was cared for at home by family members.The answer to suffering, physical or mental, is affection and good care. This should come first and as far as possible from family and community, supported by institutions.“Finishing people off” may suit our current individualistic, utilitarian, impatient culture, but it will degrade us all in the end.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/106357606/No-human-dignity-in-killing-or-being-killedKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Ticket prices released for FA Cup final on Sunday

first_imgThe FA Cup Committee, today, announced the ticket prices for the MTN FA Cup final at the Accra Sports Stadium on 14th July have been released.The all-premiership final will see league champions Asante Kotoko play Medeama on Sunday.Ticket pricesPopular Stand – GHS 2.00Osu Stand – GHS 3.00VIP Lower/Upper – GHS 5.00 (GHc1 MTN Credit included) VVIP – GHS 10.00 (GHc2 MTN Credit included)MTN FA CUP FinalClubs: Asante Kotoko v Medeama SCDate: Sunday, July 14, 2013Venue: Accra Sports Stadiumlast_img

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Steve Kerr explains why DeMarcus Cousins’ rehab is ‘tricky’

first_imgOAKLAND — If only the Warriors had to evaluate DeMarcus Cousins solely on the strength of his left quadricep muscle. Instead, the Warriors have listed DeMarcus Cousins as questionable when the Warriors play the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday for other reasons, too.“DeMarcus is making good progress. But the timing of this whole thing is tricky because he misses two months,” Warriors coach … Click here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.last_img

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With Mike Yastrzemski out, Giants turn to relatively untested left fielder

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSAN FRANCISCO — Giants outfielder Mike Yastrzemski missed Monday’s game against the Arizona Diamondbacks with soreness in his left hand/wrist and is considered day to day after he was hit by a pitch in the Bay Bridge Series finale against the A’s.Yastrzemski was hit by a Jake Diekman pitch in the seventh inning Sunday in what became a 5-4 Giants win. Yastrzemski stayed in the game and was later caught stealing third …last_img

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Cell Nucleus Complexity Baffles Evolutionists

first_imgIn her inimitable way, Science reporter Elizabeth Pennisi has once again portrayed a scientific controversy undergoing active ferment.  This time it’s about the evolutionary origin of cell nuclei, which she terms “specialized, DNA-filled command centers.”1  At the conclusion, she gives prominence to a “provocative, but circumstantial and controversial” suggestion that viruses taught cells how to wrap their DNA in double membranes with controlled access.  Since the idea presupposes that viruses preceded all three domains of life – prokarya, eukarya and archaea – “If this is true, then we are all basically descended from viruses,” as a believer puts it.  The idea is unpalatable to some.  “I do not believe [it],” a German molecular biologist retorts.  “The idea of the viruses ‘inventing’ [eukaryotic cells] from scratch is hard for me to conceive.”    Pennisi treats the new viral theory as tentative at best.  What’s more revealing in her article are the problems with previously-popular ideas, and why.  According to her, the key insight at a meeting in France last month on the subject was: “They had underestimated the complexity of the eukaryotic cell’s 1.5-billion-year-old precursor.  The data presented indicated that this ancestral cell had more genes, more structures, and more diverse biochemical processes than previously imagined.”  For a glimpse why, look at Pennisi’s brief description of the nucleus:Each nucleus in a eukaryotic cell consists of a double lipid-based membrane punctuated by thousands of sophisticated protein complexes called nuclear pores, which control molecular traffic in and out of the organelle.  Inside, polymerases and other specialized enzymes transfer DNA’s protein-coding message to RNA.  Other proteins modify the strands of RNA to ensure that they bring an accurate message to the ribosomes outside the nucleus.  The nucleus also contains a nucleolus, a tightly packed jumble of RNA and proteins that are modified and shipped out of the nucleus to build ribosomes.(For more on the nuclear pore complex, see 06/17/2002 and 01/18/2002 headlines.)Eukaryotes are distinguished from bacteria by their double-membrane nuclei.  “The nuclear distinction between prokaryotes and eukaryotes shaped early speculation about the development of complex life,” Pennisi says about ideas floating around up to the 1970s.  Some thought eukaryotes were evolved prokaryotes, and others thought prokaryotes were degenerate eukaryotes.  But then Carl Woese created new woes by identifying bacteria-like cells that were distinct from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes: so different, in fact, to warrant classification in their own domain – archaea.  Others soon were surprised to find that eukaryotes appeared to have genes from both bacteria and archaea.    So another story was born, the endosymbiont or merger hypothesis.  This proposed that eukaryotes arose from “the ancient symbiotic partnership between bacteria and archaea.”  That theory came under fire from the discovery of faint but distinct nuclei in an unusual group of bacteria, named planctomycetes, that live in soil and fresh water.  Some of these planctomycetes have organelles and double-membraned sacs of DNA and RNA.  According to a critic of the merger model, these observations “turn the dogma that ‘prokaryotes have no internal membranes’ upside down”  Now, it seems no one is sure which way is up.    There’s more to cause vertigo for evolutionists: the complexity of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs).  “Explaining these structures has always posed a sticking point for nuclear evolution.”  For one thing, “without pores, the nucleus can’t function.”  But for another thing, Pennisi continues, the same planctomycetes, and possibly some other archaea and prokaryotes, apparently possess structures resembling these complex traffic-control gates.  “Bacteria with nuclear pores and internal membranes, features typically considered eukaryote-specific, suggest that the nucleus was born much earlier than traditionally thought.”    For some, that leaves as the leading contender the controversial theory that viruses first invented the nucleus.  This, however, only pushes the complexity of nuclei and their pores farther back in time, and foists a huge design problem on earth’s most primitive biological entities.  That is why the molecular biologist quoted earlier can’t believe that simple viruses created such complex structures from scratch.  Pennisi shares a few speculations, based on circumstantial evidence, how it might have happened.  But when she ends by pushing the answer to the future, it underscores the fact that no current theory accounts for the origin of the nucleus:Did a virus provide the first nucleus?  Or was it something an early bacterial cell evolved, either on its own or in partnership with an archaeum?  To resolve the origin of the nucleus, evolutionary biologists are exploring new techniques that enable them to determine relationships of microorganisms that go much further back in time….The biologists in France argued and discussed many ideas.  “But when it came to accounting for how the nucleus was born,” Pennisi admits, “no single hypothesis bubbled to the top.”  She quotes French molecular biologist Patrick Forterre who said, “It’s like a puzzle.  People try to put all the pieces together, but we don’t know who is right or if there is still some crucial piece of information missing.”1Elizabeth Pennisi, “Evolutionary Biology: The Birth of the Nucleus,” Science, Vol 305, Issue 5685, 766-768, 6 August 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.305.5685.766].The crucial piece of missing information is information itself.  Information: DNA, logic, codes, controlled access, complex systems of integrated parts: these are all indicators of intelligent design.  This would be obvious if the biologists at that meeting would only think outside the Darwinian box in which they have imprisoned themselves.  Look at what contortions they have to go through to account for such biological complexity by chance.  As usual, the answer is somewhere out there in the future.  Also as usual, the same trend is seen here as in everything else in biology, and even in paleontology and cosmology: more complexity, further back toward the beginning.    Poor Elizabeth.  She has reported on so many of these evolutionist hand-wringing sessions you would think she might have taken up gardening by now to maintain her sanity.  But that might not help.  Just looking at the soil and thinking about those planctomycetes, and looking at the leaves and thinking about those nuclear pore complexes, DNA decoders accurately translating messages into specialized enzymes, all those shipping and receiving docks, and all the other thousands of sophisticated complexes working together in those command centers called nuclei might bring the stress and anxiety right back again.  “Come unto Me,” said the Designer, “all you who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”(Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Cassini Skimmed Over Enceladus at Close Range

first_imgThe Cassini spacecraft made its closest-yet flyby of Enceladus July 14, skimming just 109 miles above the surface.  This was the closest approach to any object thus far in the four-year mission.  It was nearly three times closer than the earlier record, the March 9 Enceladus flyby (see encounter map).    Enceladus has long been one of the most intriguing moons in the solar system because of its extremely bright surface, and its large uncratered regions riddled with cracks and ridges (see photo gallery).  The BBC News summarized some of the puzzles regarding this Saturnian satellite.  Is it a source of E-ring particles?  Does it have ice volcanos and geysers?  Is there an ocean below the surface?  The biggest mystery is the source of energy to drive resurfacing processes.  Enceladus has a very nearly circular orbit and is not in any known tidal interactions with other moons, or with Saturn.  No ammonia has yet been detected in the spectrum (ammonia might allow a lower melting point for the water ice that makes up the bulk of the moon).  How, then, could melting occur, especially in recent times?    A beautiful picture of the little moon Prometheus shepherding the F-ring was released by the Cassini team this week: click here, and also the first tantalizing look at a moon that looks like a sponge: Hyperion.Update 07/15/2005: The raw images were posted at the Cassini website late Friday.  New and improved images of Rhea taken from 182,000 kilometers were posted first.  Later, the Enceladus data stream came in.  Wide-angle views revealed a bizarre set of tiger-like stripes near the south pole (a region never before imaged), and a huge canyon on the eastern limb (example).  Distinct boundaries between cratered and resurfaced regions were clearly visible.  Closer in (example), the stripes began to look like four nearly parallel canyons emanating from a rough highland across a smooth plain.  From 9,000 miles (example), they are seen to intersect earlier canyons in complex ways.  The two highest-resolution images near closest approach (narrow and wide angle), slightly smeared due to the speed of the spacecraft (over 18,000 mph) at such close range, reveal a somewhat fluffy-looking region of hills and valleys.  No clear signs of volcanos or geysers are apparent, either at highest resolution or looking back along the limb during the outbound leg (example).  To first order, the topographic features appear tectonic rather than fluvial.  Data from other instruments, such as the visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS), will assist scientists in interpreting the images.  Here is the BBC News post-encounter report, and check out the photo gallery on the Imaging Team website.  The Planetary Society also did a full page spread on the flyby sequence and posted sample images.    The Cassini team has pulled off another resounding success in a string of spectacular encounters during the spacecraft’s first year in orbit (see 07/01/2004 story).  The rapid-fire sequence of images of Enceladus today, along with those from March and February this year, have brought sudden fulfillment to years of yearning since Cassini was first designed in the early 1980s, with dreams of Enceladus at close range part of the plans.  Interpreting the new images is sure to keep planetary geologists busy for years.Note: dark lines cutting across the right side of some raw images are due to the lossless compression algorithm used.  The software estimates the compression ratio in advance because of the constraints of time during the encounter.  Interpolation can reconstruct the missing pixels.Update 07/20/2005: New Scientist quoted some scientists puzzling over the bouldery surface seen at highest resolution: “That’s a surface texture I have never seen anywhere else in the solar system,” said one; said another, “This is just strange.  In fact, I have a really hard time understanding what I’m seeing.”  The boulders seem to avoid rather than filling in the cracks, and there are no small craters.  Neither is there hoped-for evidence of liquid flow on the surface, and Enceladus, being six times smaller than Europa, seems too small to maintain a subsurface ocean.  “Trying to figure out what is going on is going to take a lot longer than a weekend of swapped emails,” said one member of the imaging team.Update 07/26/2005: a JPL press release says that the south pole looks younger than the rest of the moon.  The region has no impact craters and has been carved into hills of house-sized boulders by unique tectonic features.  This was unexpected; the south polar region appears to be distinct from other parts of the moon, and is being called one of the youngest surfaces in the solar system.  “Young terrain requires a means to generate the heat needed to modify the surface,” the report says.  More interesting facts about Enceladus may come to light when data from the other instruments are combined with the visible-light images.  JPL also provided a dramatic zoom-in movie (also on the imaging team site) showing where the highest resolution image was taken in context to the moon as a whole.Update 07/29/2005: Another press release from Jet Propulsion Laboratory has announced the discovery of “ice volcanism” near the south pole.  The heavily cratered north pole is very different from the south, where the temperature is significantly warmer, and there are no impact craters.  Scientists believe water ice is erupting from cracks that crisscross the south pole like tiger stripes.  If so, Enceladus becomes the smallest moon to exhibit cryovolcanism.  The previously-reported atmosphere turns out to be localized around the south pole, where it leaks away and is continuously replenished.  This eruptive activity, however, is not the source of the E-ring particles.  Cassini’s cosmic dust analyzer has confirmed, as suspected, that micrometeor impacts against the moon eject particles that become distributed into the broad, diffuse E-ring.  To find such activity at one of the poles was a big surprise; one scientist said, “This is as astonishing as if we’d flown past Earth and found that Antarctica was warmer than the Sahara.”Scientists find the temperatures difficult to explain if sunlight is the only heat source.  More likely, a portion of the polar region, including the “tiger stripe” fractures, is warmed by heat escaping from the interior.  Evaporation of this warm ice at several locations within the region could explain the density of the water vapor cloud detected by other instruments.  How a 500-kilometer (310-mile) diameter moon can generate this much internal heat and why it is concentrated at the south pole is still a mystery.    Another Cassini Press Release from July 29 provides more of the pieces to the cryovolcanism puzzle.  The atmosphere earlier detected by the magnetometer turns out to be lopsided; eruptions of material are not coming from the northern hemisphere, but only from the south polar region.  The UV spectrometer also detected this asymmetry during an occultation.  One of the infrared instruments showed the south to be warmer than the north, and the visible-light cameras observed many tectonic features near the south pole.  The cooperative activity of multiple instruments onboard Cassini each contributed to the interpretation that cryovolcanism is occurring.  Why, and how, this should happen on a tiny moon subjected to insufficient tidal stresses, and with insufficient radioactive heating in its interior, is unexplained.    Since this moon is turning out to be one of the big attractions of the mission, Enceladus will probably be a front-runner for additional close flybys during any approved extended mission.  The next extremely close flyby is scheduled for March 12, 2008 at only 97 km (58 miles).  Several others before then are in the 80,000 km range.Enceladus illustrates several processes going on at Saturn that appear unlikely to be sustainable for billions of years (see 03/10/2005 and 03/04/2005 entries).  The BBC news article, for instance, mentioned that E-ring particles can only survive for hundreds of years, not billions.  This means that to maintain belief that the ring is ancient, planetary scientists must find that Enceladus has been continually replenishing the particles for over four billion years.  Recall, however, that a huge explosion and loss of mass from the E-ring was observed in early 2004 (see 07/02/2004 entry).  It is unlikely that event was atypical.  Such destructive processes do not add to the ring; they erode it even faster.    Regardless of one’s interpretation of the images, one thing all can agree on: the Cassini team deserves congratulations from around the world.  To be able to glimpse this kind of detail on bodies that are mere specks from Earth telescopes, to be able to navigate a ship 880 million miles away with such precision, and to be able to send streams of ones and zeroes through empty space and reconstruct them into photographs on Earth, is truly astonishing.  With the extraordinary becoming so commonplace in our technological civilization, we tend to forget that we are living in a historic period of discovery.  Early astronomers could never have imagined what we saw today.  Had they been told it would one day become possible, how they would have longed for a chance to share this experience.  Catch the drama of what is happening.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Broadband in Africa set to soar

first_imgThe SAT-3 cable emerges from the watersat one of its landing points. SAT-3 snakes along the seabed onits way from South Africa to Portugal.(Both images: SAT-3/WASC/SAFE)Janine ErasmusA new study by a US-based investment advisory firm suggests that Africa’s broadband market is set to quadruple by 2012, with the current 2.7-million users soaring to 12.7-million. Aimed at service providers, investors and infrastructure suppliers, the study was conducted in 33 African markets.Although based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the work of AfricaNext Investment Research is focused on Africa, specifically on that continent’s telecommunications, media and technology sectors. The company is interested not only in Africa’s largest economies, such as South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya, but also in emerging markets such as Ethiopia and the Central African Republic.With its report titled 3G, WiMAX, ADSL and the Future of African Broadband, the company aims to dispel the pessimism that has pervaded the broadband sector in recent years. AfricaNext attributes the low incidence of broadband penetration in Africa until now to a variety of factors such as expensive services, high prices for international bandwidth, dilapidated infrastructure, and restrictive regulatory frameworks.However, a number of new, more positive factors are coming into play at the same time, says the company, and suddenly the future of broadband in Africa is looking much brighter. In fact, the continent should prepare itself for a surge in broadband growth over the next four years.These factors are diverse and include, among others, last mile competition, international gateway licensing, new submarine cables, domestic fibre backbone developments, unified licences, improvements in radio spectral efficiency, increased internet usage from a younger population, and increased availability of capital.In spite of the traditionally gloomy outlook for mobile business models in Africa, AfricaNext argues that 2009 is likely to be the start of greater things for the telecommunications sector. Broadband operators, equipment suppliers and investors may well find that 2009 presents an excellent opportunity for returns.In fact, it may be the most significant opportunity since the recent mobile voice boom, where mobile subscribers mushroomed over nine years from 2-million in 2000 to 270-million. And the tipping point could be as little as 12 months away.Far East investmentThe report also singles out Huawei Technologies as a major influence on future developments. The networking and telecommunications equipment supplier is the largest such company in the People’s Republic of China. Huawei has spent the last decade making substantial investments in Africa and is now a next-generation communications equipment supplier to more than 30 countries on the continent.With more than 2 000 employees, over 50% of whom are recruited locally, Huawei has set up training centres in Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt, Tunisia, and most recently, South Africa. Located in Woodmead, Johannesburg, the newest training facility opened in August 2008. A sixth training centre is under construction in Angola.Underwater technologiesA slew of new submarine cable developments will bring faster internet access to areas in Africa that were formerly deprived. East Africa, particularly, is the only region in the world that has no link to international communication networks, except through satellite communication. Because this technology is expensive, it has hindered business growth as well as development in vital areas such as education.West Africa has high-speed connectivity through the SAT-3 cable but this, too, has been more expensive than necessary because the consortium that controls SAT-3 has kept prices high.The East African Submarine Cable System (Eassy), the SEA Cable System (Seacom), and the East Africa Marine System (Teams) are all currently under construction.Seacom is planning to launch its cable in June 2009, just in time for the Fifa Confederations Cup, while Eassy is on track for completion by the time the long-awaited 2010 Fifa World Cup kicks off. Countries from South Africa all the way up to Sudan, as well as a number of land-locked countries, will benefit from fast and cheap bandwidth once the cables come into operation.Alcatel-Lucent, who control the Teams cable, have announced that laying of the cable should be complete before mid-2009. Teams will link the port city of Mombasa in Kenya to Fujairah in the United Arab Emirates.Other submarine cable developments include the Middle East North Africa project that will connect Egypt and a number of Middle East and Mediterranean countries, as well as Main One, which will link Portugal to South Africa with landing points along the continent’s west coast. The latter project will be implemented in two phases, both of which are scheduled for completion in May 2010.The West Africa Cable System will link Cape Town to the UK via at least 10 other countries. It was scheduled for completion in 2010 but reports are now hinting at 2011.Cutting edgeThe emergence of cutting-edge wireless technologies such as EVDO and WiMAX have also opened up internet access where cable-laying is impractical, says AfricaNext.Evolution Data Only/Evolution Data Optimized is a technology that allows users to connect wirelessly to the internet without having to be near a hotspot. The EVDO card provides instant and direct access, wherever the user may be at the time.WiMAX, or Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a powerful wireless access standard that provides broadband speed without the need for direct line-of-sight to a base station. Since it offers high bandwidth at a low cost, experts predict that WiMAX will become the dominating wireless broadband access standard in the next few years.Data gathered by AfricaNext shows that there were about 2.7-million broadband subscriptions at the end of 2007. Of these, 90% were located in Egypt, South Africa, Morocco, Nigeria, Algeria and Angola. The company now estimates that by the end of 2012 the number of subscriptions will have increased fourfold to 12.7-million.In terms of general internet use, the African continent had between 45-million and 55-million users at the end of 2007. This represents just 3% of the world’s total and a 5% penetration of the population. AfricaNext projects that this number will reach over 100-million by 2012.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected] storiesBetter broadband for AfricaEASSy undersea cable on trackUseful linksHuawei in AfricaAfricaNextTelkomNeotelEVDOWiMAXlast_img read more

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Browse & Share GIS Maps with New iOS App from ESRI

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Fans of geographic information systems (GIS) can now get their mapping fix on the go, as the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) has launched an impressive mapping application for iOS devices. The California-based company specializes in providing GIS and geodatabase software applications, and holds a significant share of these markets. With the free ArcGIS app, users can now access and explore an enormous database of maps, including street maps, topographic maps, ecological maps and more.The app is laid out very well, with three buttons along the bottom to let users quickly view the current map, search for places or features and find new maps to view. Each map also features the ability to use a few tools that let users identify locations and measure distances between two points and areas within polygons. The app only supports maps from ArcGIS, ESRI’s suite of mapping software, including those available on ArcGIS Online and on custom server installations. Users can sign into an existing ArcGIS server to access their personal or corporate GIS data while on their iOS device. The app also categorizes public maps into groups, including featured, popular, highest-rated, recent and favorite maps. ESRI says it is working on including the ability to collect and update GIS features and attributes, as well as perform GIS analysis through geoprocessing tasks. This means iPhone owners could use their devices to collect GIS data and upload it to services like OpenStreetMap, one of the featured map sets on the app. The next time you are walking through a park whose paths are not yet mapped, you could create a GPS trace and update the map with that data. chris cameron Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The company is also providing an ArcGIS API that is currently in beta, with an expected full release slated for August. “Developers and ESRI partners will use the API to create applications for both external and internal use. They can also easily build applications that work with their own published Web services,” the company said in a press release Tuesday.While some are disappointed that the app is ArcGIS only and doesn’t support other mapping platforms like the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), the app is still very handy for those interested in GIS data. ESRI has such a large market share on mapping software that the lack of OGC support shouldn’t be too big of a hurdle for mapping diehards. The ArcGIS API should also be exciting, as developers now have the opportunity to create fascinating implementations of the various layers found across the ArcGIS ecosystem. Tags:#Location#web last_img read more

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Why Your Company Should Have a Facebook Page (Not a Profile)

first_imgTags:#biz#How To Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts john paul titlowcenter_img The need to leverage social media for business is a no-brainer at this point, but a company’s effectiveness on Facebook can be hampered if the account isn’t set up properly. Here are four reasons why your business should be set up as a Page, rather than a standard profile. Facebook Says SoAccording to Facebook’s terms of service, “Profiles represent individuals and must be held under an individual name, while Pages allow an organization, business, celebrity, or band to maintain a professional presence on Facebook.” If your business’ profile gets shut down by Facebook for violating this rule, your friends list will vanish with it. Pages Offer Analytics and Like WidgetsTwo really crucial advantages of administering a Page are user analytics and easily-embeddable Like buttons and widgets. With the recently overhauled Facebook Insights, you can view all kinds of useful data about user activity on your page, including how many likes and comments you received each day, demographic break-downs and much more. This data can be really useful for understanding the characteristics of your customer base, and knowing which wall posts get the best reaction. This data is not available to individual profiles.Another thing profiles don’t offer is the means to embed a Like button and other Open Graph plugins into your own site. This is a major setback for businesses hoping to grow their audience on Facebook. Pages Can Have Unlimited Fans.On Facebook, individual profiles are limited to 5,000 friends, whereas Pages can have unlimited fans (or likes). Once your profile friend list reaches 5,000, Facebook will encourage you to set up a Page, but doesn’t offer a tool to convert your profile to a Page. For that, you’re on your own.Converting a Profile to a Page is a NightmareIf you already set up your business on Facebook with a profile, converting “friends” to “fans” is no simple process. The only way to switch them over is to politely ask the friends to do it themselves. This can be accomplished either via status update or by sending them all a message explaining the change and linking them to your new Page. A third option would be to use Facebook’s formal Page recommendation tool to suggest that friends Like your new page. However, this option doesn’t give you the opportunity to type a custom message explaining why you’re asking them to do it.When converting friends to fans, it’s important to clearly articulate to users why you’re asking them to like your business, because in their mind they’re already connected to it via Facebook and shouldn’t need to take any further action. You’ll need to include a concise and friendly note to your users explaining that you’re switching from a profile to a Page to better serve them and ask them to click the like button to stay connected. Whichever approach you take, there’s no guarantee that each and every one of your friends will end up clicking on your Page’s like button, and repeatedly following up to remind them to do so can annoy users.At some point, you’ll have to decide if you’re going to delete the original profile, keep it semi-hidden via privacy settings or just let it sit there. Maintaining two different presences on Facebook can be confusing for your users, and thanks to Facebook’s friend recommendation feature, your long-abandoned profile will continue to pop up when friends of friends log in, and the requests will keep rolling in. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Global Maternal Health Conference 2010: Day One Take-Aways from the Young Champions

first_imgPosted on August 31, 2010June 21, 2017By: Lorraine Thompson, Winner, Ashoka’s Maternal Health Blogging ContestClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On August 30 at 8:00am, the air was already hot and sticky as Ashoka’s Young Champions and Changemakers boarded an air-conditioned bus. After careening across Delhi’s bumpy streets, the young social entrepreneurs stepped into the bright light of downtown Delhi for their first day at the Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC).In the morning they attended the Conference’s inaugural ceremonies. After lunch they absorbed new facts, figures and findings at special conference sessions. Later that evening, I caught up with two Young Champions and a Changemaker to ask a question:What was your most important takeaway from today’s GMHC sessions? How will it impact your work?Onikepe Owolabi“At the first presentation today, I was struck by the obstetric epidemiologist from Aberdeen (Wendy J. Graham from Immpact at the Univeristy of Aberdeen). She kept mentioning context of research. And it struck me that when we look at studies to influence what we do, we should always try to find out about the culture of the people there. And the other things was her idea of ‘failing forward’: learning to maximize our failures—to make them into successes and leverage them for future successes.”“In the afternoon, I attended a session on the social and economic impacts on maternal health. There was a young man who spoke about a qualitative study done in Nepal. Because of what I heard in the morning, I was a lot more open to qualitative research. Sometimes people think it’s not as scientific as quantitative data collection. He spoke about the cultural things that stopped women from accessing healthcare. He kind of sparked a thought in my heart—that culture is an integral part of people’s lives.”“I think the aim of our Young Champion projects should be to eliminate the harmful practices of culture. But maybe we will get women to access healthcare better if we can incorporate some good parts of culture. From my cultural context, many people use traditional birth attendants because they want the love, the prayers and the social support. So maybe if we could somehow incorporate those spiritual rituals into hospital birthing and institutional deliveries, women would be more open to using them—as against just insisting that they come to the hospital.”Seth Cochran“The partner I work with in Uganda uses these birth kits. She goes around to different women in the villages and shows them a little backpack filled with things that will make a pregnancy safer. Really basic stuff. Like soap to wash your hands. A razor to cut the cord—a sterile razor. A clean blanket.”“Originally I thought, it was a great idea. But it turns out it’s a pretty controversial idea. A lot of people worry that if you give a woman this kit of clean stuff, it’s going to tell her it’s okay to give birth at home. And that’s not what the institutional players want. They want the women having their babies in hospitals. Which I think is ideal—but in a lot of cases not realistic.”“Since the Women Deliver Conference, I’ve been thinking I need to better understand this discussion. So today I went to a session on birth kits. It was structured almost like a debate. Like, Here are some of the facts: What do you think?”“And it became very clear to me what I want to do. With these birth kits, there are all these possibilities, right? It doesn’t have to be a facility birth. If you manage it properly, not only can it make a woman want to go to the hospital, it can help the hospital more effectively treat her. It’s a packaged set of commodities—and the facility may be short of commodities.”At the hospital, they know, if they’ve been trained, how to receive this woman: The woman comes with a little package, they can immediately take every thing out, do the job quicker, more effectively, make sure everything’s there.”“Today the debate made it very clear in my mind that I’m going to do this as a fundamental part of my program. The specifics of how—I’m not quite sure about yet. But my mind was boiling with possibilities: You could sell these things. You could sell vouchers for additional care. You could give them vouchers for local transport—negotiate with taxis. It’s a physical good, a package that’s not only sellable to the woman in Africa—or donate-able—but it’s also saleable to the donating public. Because it’s tangible. And it’s low cost—probably less than $10 or $15.”Dr. Minal Singh“I liked meeting people from the same field, with a similar cause. The best part was I’m coming away with the feeling that I’m not alone—I’m not facing different values in the field of maternal health. The values are shared by people all over the world. So it gives me lots of inspiration to work with new energy when I get back.”“There are so many synergies. Though we had little time to connect with all the partners, I’m sure we have their contact details and their organization names. Thanks to the World Wide Web, we’ll be able to connect again. I can see much potential—people from whom I can learn and partner.”“In the afternoon I attended a session on the social and economic and cultural implications of maternal health. It was a very nice talk. And this is actually the problem we are facing—the gap in India between the rural and the urban and also the economic gap. So I hope this will help me implement better.”Lorraine Thompson is the winner of the Ashoka’s Maternal Health Blogging Contest and is live blogging for the Change Summit and the Global Maternal health Conference. Stay up to date with the conference happenings! Follow the Maternal Health Task Force and EngenderHealth on Twitter: @MHTF and @EngenderHealth. The conference hashtag is #GMHC2010.For more posts about the Global Maternal Health Conference, click here.For the live stream schedule, click here.Check back soon for the archived videos of the conference presentations. Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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