US, Japan agree on BSE precautions for beef trade

first_imgOct 26, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – US and Japanese negotiators have reached general agreement on steps for resuming their beef trade after a 10-month interruption caused by the discovery of a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington state last December. Transcript of Oct 23 press conferencehttp://www.usda.gov/documents/NewsReleases/2004/10/0466.doc USDA question-and-answer bulletinhttp://www.usda.gov/documents/NewsReleases/2004/10/qa0465.doc “We have agreed that we will use all of these production records, and we will augment that with determination of livestock age by physiological means, meaning by a grading system which looks at the particular characteristics of the carcass and determines the animal’s age,” Penn said, as quoted in the news conference transcript. Penn expressed hope that the scheduled review of the agreement next July will lead to further easing of restrictions on beef exports. He said the animal health experts to be involved in the review, including officials from the World Health Organization and the World Animal Organization for Animal Health (OIE), will consider new research findings and the results of expanded BSE surveillance in the United States. Other elements of the new agreement, according to the USDA, are as follows: “We think this review in July 2004 will be very important and then we hope, following that, we can eventually return to the normal trade patterns that we had before BSE was first discovered” in the United States, Penn said. The age of US cattle will be determined by production records, birth records, and the USDA’s physiologic grading system. The United States will resume importing Japanese specialty beef. (That trade, involving a very expensive, high-quality type of beef, amounted to about $250,000 in 2001.) BSE experts say the incubation period for BSE is such that the disease is very unlikely to be found in cattle younger than 30 months old. But two cases in animals 21 and 23 months old reportedly were discovered in Japan, the USDA said, and Japan has been testing all its cattle for BSE before releasing the meat for sale. Recently the Japanese decided to stop testing cattle less than 21 months old, because BSE has not been found in cattle that young. Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura called the agreement “a very good step toward the final resolution in reopening the beef trade,” according to an Oct 24 Agence France-Presse report. US Secretary of State Colin Powell said the situation “is not resolved” but called the agreement “a major step forward.” Lambert said the USDA, working with Japanese officials, will develop a study “to show the relationship between physiological and chronological age,” with the aim of ensuring that only carcasses of cattle younger than 21 months will be used for export. Penn said plans call for completing the study within 45 days. Verifying the age of cattle was reported to be a major issue in the negotiations. At a news conference, J. B. Penn, USDA under secretary for farm and foreign agricultural services, explained that it’s not possible to have a birth certificate for every calf born in the United States, with its large cattle herds spread over wide areas. But there are individual birth records for some animals, while herd records and artificial insemination records provide approximate birth dates for others, he said. See also: “Trade between the two countries will resume following completion of regulatory processes in both countries,” the USDA said in a news release. “Japan now is revising domestic regulations to alter its BSE cattle testing requirements and other procedures. The United States will initiate rulemaking procedures relating to importation of Japanese specialty beef.” To define the criteria for the grading system, the USDA will conduct a study of the relationship between the age and physiologic characteristics of cattle. Under the agreement announced Oct 23, Japan will import US beef only from cattle younger than 21 months of age as a precaution against BSE, or mad cow disease, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The agency estimated it will take several weeks to iron out details and restart trade. Specified risk materials—tissues most likely to harbor the BSE agent in infected animals—will be removed from all carcasses to be used for export. Japan was the largest importer of US beef before the BSE case, buying about $1.7 billion worth in 2003, according to the USDA. About 10% of American beef is exported. USDA estimates that at least 70% of the 35 million US cattle slaughtered each year are less than 21 months old. Oct 23 USDA news releasehttp://www.usda.gov/documents/NewsReleases/2004/10/0465.doc Dr. Charles Lambert, USDA deputy under secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, said the taste and tenderness of beef are related to physiologic maturity, and physiologic maturity was incorporated in the USDA’s beef grading system in 1965 for that reason. Penn said 81% of US beef cattle are no more than 20 months old at slaughter, with most of them 16 to 18 months old. The grading system will be used as “added insurance to make sure that no animal 20 months or older would be shipped to the Japanese market,” he said. The two countries and a group of international animal health experts will review the agreement next July and consider modifications.last_img read more

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Public pensions, sovereign funds target infrastructure increases

first_imgPublic pension and sovereign wealth funds aim to invest more in property and infrastructure over the next two years, according to a new survey.Having been the fastest-growing portion of sovereign wealth fund (SWF) and public pension fund portfolios in recent years, real assets such as property and infrastructure are set to take up even larger slices of investors’ allocations.In its latest Global Public Investor report, London and Singapore-based think tank OMFIF said 70% of the 750 global public investors it surveyed planned to increase their infrastructure investments over the next 12-24 months – and none planned to decrease.Real estate was the next most popular asset class for future allocations, with almost 45% of pension funds and SWFs planning to increase their investments. However, 12% said they were planning to reduce property investments in this period. This planned reduction was mostly led by institutions with large allocations to real estate that have seen the value of their investments grow over recent years, OMFIF said in the report.“Most said they intend to reinvest the proceeds in new real estate projects,” it said. “Value-add and opportunistic projects, which offer greater potential for value appreciation and are less expensive than prime real estate in core locations, are the main targets for these acquisitions.”Between 2009 and 2017, SWFs and public pension funds’ combined property allocation climbed by nearly 120%, OMFIF said, citing a separate 2018 report it produced in conjunction with BNY Mellon. Infrastructure grew by 165%, albeit from a lower base. These investors had an average allocation to real estate of 9.3%, and 3.6% to infrastructure.The Global Public Investor report found that total assets had grown by $2.5trn (€2.1trn), or roughly 7.3%, to reach $36.2trn.This was the largest such increase in the five years since it started tracking the assets of the 750 institutions in its survey, OMFIF said. It cited the global economic recovery and upturn in equity markets as reasons for the asset surge.last_img read more

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Borgen is spectacular at Buffalo River Fargo Tractor special

first_imgGLYNDON, Minn. (Sept. 13-14) – A driver who is no stranger to victory lane at Buffalo River Race Park found his way to that hallowed ground again Sunday night.Bryce Borgen topped the $1,000 to win IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified main event in the 2014 season finale. The two-time BRRP track champion earned a spot on the ballot for the 2015 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational along with the Fargo Tractor IMCA Spectacular checkers. Deveryn Malmlov, Saturday winner Justin Jones, Michael Greseth and Cody Erickson completed the top five. Borgen had started fourth and was most of a straightaway behind Jones before starting his drive to the front. “All of a sudden my car just came alive,” Borgen said following his third sanctioned win of the season. “I’d run second on Saturday night. It felt good to be able to work my way by him (Jones) and pass him on the top side.” The final caution came with three circuits left in the 30-lapper. Borgen’s margin of victory was two car lengths. Jones earned $750 for his Saturday victory. Rick Pavlicek swept the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod features, earning $300 on opening night and $500 on Sunday. Sept. 13 Feature Results Modifieds – 1. Justin Jones; 2. Bryce Borgen; 3. Michael Greseth; 4. Bob Sagen; 5. Michael Tiani; 6. Shane Bruns; 7. Tyler Hall; 8. Jeff Odden; 9. Brent Pulskamp; 10. David Goulet; 11. Tyler Peterson; 12. Dusty Peterson; 13. Larry Niemi; 14. Tim Perkins; 15. Brennan Borg; 16. Josh Beaulieu; 17. Deveryn Malmlov; 18. Matt Aukland; 19. Ross Romdalvik; 20. Billy Vogel; 21. Tom Cummings; 22. Dan Dowling.Northern SportMods – 1. Rich Pavlicek; 2. Tim Kanten; 3. Scott Zimmerman; 4. Scott Jacobson; 5. Tailin Tommerdahl; 6. Tom Andring; 7. Patrick Brejcha; 8. Michael Ernst; 9. Charlie Jensen; 10. Jesse Skalicky; 11. Lucas Rodin; 12. Levi Babcock; 13. Jeff Nelson; 14. Nick Curtis; 15. Cody Peterson; 16. Robert Plath; 17. Luke Lick; 18. Danny Hazemann; 19. Andrew Maxwell; 20. Jackson Moffett. Sept. 14 Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Borgen; 2. Malmlov; 3. Jones; 4. Greseth; 5. Cody Erickson; 6. Pulskamp; 7. Sagen; 8. Tyler Peterson; 9. Hall; 10. Beaulieu; 11. Goulet; 12. Tiana; 13. Niemi; 14. Borg; 15. Dowling; 16. Dusty Peterson; 17. Odden; 18. Bruns; 19. Vogel; 20. John Schuelke.Northern SportMods – 1. Pavlicek; 2. Ernst; 3. Kanten; 4. Tommerdah; 5. Chris Vanmil; 6. Jensen; 7. Jacobson; 8. Lick; 9. Peterson; 10. Rodin; 11. Brady Petermann; 12. Maxwell; 13. Andring; 14. Curtis; 15. Plath; 17. Donny Marquardt; 18. Nelson; 19. Brejcha; 20. Hazemann.last_img read more

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