Traditionals with a twist Biscotti by Fiona Burrell

first_imgThese hard biscuits have become popular in the past few years and are often served in cafés with coffee. They originated in Tuscany, Italy, and the name ’biscotti’ actually means ’twice-cooked’.Traditional biscotti are made using both ground and whole almonds. Because they are hard, they make a perfect dunking biscuit. They look very attractive in large glass jars and they store well for a long time as long as the container is airtight.Several ingredients can be added to a basic recipe, including nuts, dried fruits or other flavourings such as chocolate, orange zest, lemon zest and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger.Spiced Orange Fruit and Nut BiscottiThese biscotti are quite soft to handle and contain a high proportion of baking powder, which makes them very light. They contain apricots, but this can be changed for other fruit for example dried cranberries at Christmas.IngredientsWhole almonds85gPistachio nuts85gButter55gPlain flour300gPinch of saltBaking powder15gGround cinnamon10gEggs, beaten3Caster sugar200gGrated zest of 1 orangeVanilla essence5gDried apricots115gMethod1. Place the almonds and pistachio nuts on a baking sheet and toast for 78 minutes or until pale brown. Cool and then chop roughly.2. Melt the butter and allow to cool.3. Sift the flour with the salt, baking powder and cinnamon.4. Beat the eggs then stir in the butter, sugar, orange zest and vanilla. Stir this into the flour mixture and add the nuts and apricots. The mixture will be quite soft. Use extra flour to bring together if too soft.5. Shape roughly into two logs on a baking sheet lined with parchment, leaving room for them to rise. Bake in a 180C oven for 30 minutes or until they feel firm to the touch. They will be golden brown. Allow to cool. Lower the oven to 140C.6. Slice the logs on a 45 diagonal into 1cm-thick slices, using a serrated knife. Place on two baking sheets and return to the oven for 15 minutes. Turn over and bake on the other side for a further 15 minutes or until they have dried out and are golden brown.7. Cool and store in an airtight container.last_img read more

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I studied Cesc game growing up – Gilmour

first_img “Yes, I did see it [after the Grimsby game],” said Gilmour. “One of my friends text me, I was buzzing. When I first came to Chelsea it was with the IEP (video analysis youth programme), so you had to focus yourself on a player and mine was Cesc. Read Also:Teen star Billy Gilmour backed to shine by Chelsea’s Barkley “I loved how he played so I just went and watched a lot of videos of him. Now I have got older, I just try to put it into the games and it’s working. But no, he is a role model of mine. I never ever trained with the first-team with him, so when he was away I got opportunities around there.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Billy Gilmour has revealed he honed his own game by watching videos of former Chelsea midfielder Cesc Fabregas. Chelsea midfielder Billy Gilmour impressed against Liverpool Gilmour is the talk of the town after a man-of-the-match performance in Tuesday’s FA Cup fifth-round win over Liverpool. Fabregas publicly praised the Scottish midfielder after his performance against Grimsby Town earlier in the season.Advertisement Loading… center_img Promoted Content6 TV Characters Whose Departures Have Made The Shows BetterThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This8 Best Movies On Amazon Prime Video To Stream Right Now10 Phones That Can Easily Fit In The Smallest PocketTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All Time6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricaneslast_img read more

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