STEWART: CAR INDUSTRY HERE WOULD BENEFIT FROM SCRAPPING VRT

first_img“Other added benefits of removing VRT include a modernising of the cars on Irish roads way beyond what the Scrappage scheme could hope to achieve, improving road safety, reducing carbon emissions, and increasing the tax take through increased PRSI/PAYE contributions, as jobs in the industry grow.“Financing on purchasing a vehicle would be lower by around 25% as currently anyone buying an Irish registered vehicle on finance is actually paying stealth interest on a tax, as VRT is included in the price. “There are many more benefits, but the public have to get rid of the stigma that what I am trying to do is only for ‘northern’ drivers. As you can see, the plan will benefit the country and its people as a whole, and I need everyone’s support to get this through.”* Is Ryan Stewart right? Or is he just plain wrong? Have your say via the Contact button.STEWART: CAR INDUSTRY HERE WOULD BENEFIT FROM SCRAPPING VRT was last modified: January 7th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) “The question I often get asked is ‘How can car sales go up, yet VRT remains low?’ and the answer is simple. The Scrappage Scheme is a waiver of VRT, and this waiver has actually proven the points I have put forward – make cars cheaper, and people buy more cars! If it was completely removed, the level of new car sales would return to the good days of 2003-2006. “The end result is that employment would not only be protected, but stimulated, given the demand for new cars under the new regime. Had the Scrappage Scheme not been extended on December 8th, the industry would have ground to a halt immediately.“The same will happen on June 30th 2011, if the Scrappage Scheme is stalled, however the damage will be less, as most new car sales occur in the first six months of the year. But the motor industry has no solution, and it may be a bitter pill to swallow to get rid of VRT as it will have offered protection in the form of a trade barrier until now.“The industry and the people should support this plan; otherwise by the end of 2011, it will have a very bleak future. As far as exchequer returns are concerned, increased VAT, the recent fuel price rise, the other smaller parts of the plan, and the number of people currently driving foreign registered cars, who could then re-register at no extra cost, but pay Irish motor tax, would buoy the tax take considerably.“Currently those driving foreign registered cars pay UK road tax, they can have no sympathy if they continue to do this after VRT is removed, but by moving to a usage based tax, I have also looked at reducing the road tax we pay here, so this should be an incentive for everyone.center_img ANTI-VRT campaigner Ryan Stewart has slammed the government again, accusing them of failing to listen to reasoned arguments on scrapping the hated tax.And he says the government should scrap its Scrappage Scheme – and scrap VRT instead!“Despite the introduction of the Scrappage Scheme last year, 52 dealers closed their doors in 2010, an average of one dealer a week, despite a rise in new car sales of 24% on 2009,” said Stewart today. The campaigner – a candidate in Donegal North East in the March general election – insists: “At the basic unit cost, new cars would actually be cheaper in the Republic if the tax is removed. The fear the dealerships have is of devaluation of their current used stock, and removing VRT does have a knock on effect that used cars would depreciate in value.“This is obviously bad for the dealerships, but good for the car buying public. However the plan I published over six months ago would negate this depreciation to the dealerships by offering €300 million euro from the net gain in additional revenue, part of which has already been implemented by the Department of Finance in the recent budget.“This would ‘bail out’ the dealerships for over €1 billion worth of stock on a sale-by-sale basis. The exodus the industry fears will not materialise and they would be compensated for the devaluation in stock.“I had put it to the Minister for Finance over six months ago, that to contribute to the removal of VRT, 2 cent on diesel and 4 cent on petrol would be accepted by the public. The research was carried out and costed by myself, and in the recent budget, this exact duty rise was implemented, yet VRT remains. “There are other less imposing elements of the plan which remain to be implemented. The total revenue take to the exchequer would be approximately €550-€600 million. VRT was forecast to bring in €350 million in 2010, despite the increase in new car sales. The excess increase in the first year would be used to float the used car market.last_img read more

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Landfill expansion sought

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 In what could be the first salvo of a potentially explosive debate, Val Verde Civic Association President Jim Stephens said the community group could make a deal to accept the expansion or take a harder line. When an expansion from 97 acres to 257 acres was proposed nearly a decade ago, association leaders withheld opposition in exchange for a $250,000-a-year payout, which financed community improvements. Still, some residents have complained about odors, leading air-quality regulators to slap two nuisance violations on the landfill. “We’re not saying the doors are open for the landfill, but how do people really feel here?” Stephens said. “We’re finding the people are upset over the proposal, and that right now there are serious questions that the landfill should be able to expand.” Stephens said the existing permit and agreement forbids further expansion, and the community could seek legal redress. A community meeting is scheduled Thursday to collect public input. “The whole thing was this was an agreement to limit and stop the dump, period,” Stephens said. “If that’s the purpose, are they allowed to come back every five years and ask for an expansion?” Landfill officials argued they can pursue expansion under the conditional use permit county supervisors granted in 1996, and say they have not violated the pact with the civic association. “The landfill believes that we are not in violation of the agreement,” said Josh Gertler, spokesman for Chiquita Canyon, which is owned by Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Republic Services Inc. “We look forward to vetting the application through the (environmental review) process, which will ultimately determine what we’re permitted to do.” Officials said the 6,000-tons-a-day landfill still has room to grow, though under current limits it could reach capacity as early as 2013 – six years before the intended closing date. Expected to close the same year is the Puente Hills Landfill in Whittier – the county’s largest disposal site – which takes in some 13,200 tons of trash a day. “The region and the county as a whole has major needs for infrastructure and for the transportation of solid waste,” Gertler said. “It’s ultimately up to the process to determine what gets built at the site and up to the decision-makers in the county to evaluate how they will meet the region’s needs.” It’s a high-stakes decision for county leaders, especially Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich. Major landfills including Puente Hills, Sunshine Canyon near Los Angeles and Chiquita Canyon are in his Fifth District. He hasn’t taken a position on the Chiquita expansion, but is paying close attention, planning deputy Paul Novak said. “The supervisor wants to make sure any changes that comes to the landfill do not impact local residents,” he said. “It is incumbent that Republic representatives present their plan to the community and solicit input, and try to respond to any concerns the community may have.” Fred Rubin, an assistant deputy director at the county Department of Public Works, said controversy and rancor follows most landfill expansion proposals. “You have residents that don’t want something and you have people that want it,” he said. “You try to balance the needs of everybody involved to achieve what’s best for the community.” The county’s current waste disposal needs have exceeded available space, and recycling and diversion rates are already about 50 percent countywide, said Carlos Ruiz, assistant division engineer of the Public Works’ environmental programs division. “But we still have to deal with the other 50 percent,” he said. “That’s not going away.” Policymakers are gambling on a mix of new technology and landfill expansion to meet anticipated demand over the next 15 years and beyond. An experimental system to convert sewage to fuel is on the drawing board, but most are counting on a plan to ship trash by rail to the Mesquite Regional Landfill, a “megadump” about 170 miles southeast of Los Angeles. When it opens in 2008-09, the desert dump could eventually absorb up to 20,000 tons of trash per day and meet the county’s needs for up to 100 years. But it’s going to cost. Disposal rates could jump from $20 to $40 per ton to $100 per ton over 20 years as local landfills close. An expanded Chiquita Canyon could offer some relief in the interim. “Chiquita is just one element – a landfill along with other landfills to dispose of trash,” Rubin said. “If the needs were reduced greatly – if we would send out less – it would be better economically. “Until such time there is an alternative to landfilling, we’re going to need the landfill capacity.” Eugene Tong, (661) 257-5253 [email protected] IF YOU GO The Val Verde Civic Association will meet Thursday, 7 p.m. at the Val Verde County Park clubhouse, 30300 Arlington St. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VAL VERDE – As a years-long application process starts for a 98-acre expansion at the Chiquita Canyon Landfill, the 1,500 residents of the neighboring community of Val Verde are weighing their options. Lurking in the background is Los Angeles County’s growing need for affordable waste disposal. The owners of the 33-year-old dump have proposed expanding the current 257-acre working area to a total 355 acres within the 592-acre site. They also are seeking permits to allow on-site sewage treatment, which is currently prohibited. A new conditional use permit requires an environmental impact report – which takes at least a year to compile – and final approval by the county Board of Supervisors. last_img read more

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