Traditionals with a twist Biscotti by Fiona Burrell

first_imgThese hard biscuits have become popular in the past few years and are often served in cafés with coffee. They originated in Tuscany, Italy, and the name ’biscotti’ actually means ’twice-cooked’.Traditional biscotti are made using both ground and whole almonds. Because they are hard, they make a perfect dunking biscuit. They look very attractive in large glass jars and they store well for a long time as long as the container is airtight.Several ingredients can be added to a basic recipe, including nuts, dried fruits or other flavourings such as chocolate, orange zest, lemon zest and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger.Spiced Orange Fruit and Nut BiscottiThese biscotti are quite soft to handle and contain a high proportion of baking powder, which makes them very light. They contain apricots, but this can be changed for other fruit for example dried cranberries at Christmas.IngredientsWhole almonds85gPistachio nuts85gButter55gPlain flour300gPinch of saltBaking powder15gGround cinnamon10gEggs, beaten3Caster sugar200gGrated zest of 1 orangeVanilla essence5gDried apricots115gMethod1. Place the almonds and pistachio nuts on a baking sheet and toast for 78 minutes or until pale brown. Cool and then chop roughly.2. Melt the butter and allow to cool.3. Sift the flour with the salt, baking powder and cinnamon.4. Beat the eggs then stir in the butter, sugar, orange zest and vanilla. Stir this into the flour mixture and add the nuts and apricots. The mixture will be quite soft. Use extra flour to bring together if too soft.5. Shape roughly into two logs on a baking sheet lined with parchment, leaving room for them to rise. Bake in a 180C oven for 30 minutes or until they feel firm to the touch. They will be golden brown. Allow to cool. Lower the oven to 140C.6. Slice the logs on a 45 diagonal into 1cm-thick slices, using a serrated knife. Place on two baking sheets and return to the oven for 15 minutes. Turn over and bake on the other side for a further 15 minutes or until they have dried out and are golden brown.7. Cool and store in an airtight container.last_img read more

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Clean Power Plan promises health benefits

first_img Read Full Story The health benefits federal officials predict would result from implementing President Obama’s proposed Clean Power Plan —which calls for reducing carbon emissions from power plants by nearly one-third of the 2005 level by 2030 —are realistic, according to Jonathan Buonocore, research associate, Center For Health and the Global Environment at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and co-author of a study in the May 2015 issue of Nature Climate Change.In a Modern Healthcare article on August 4, 2015, Buonocore said the standards could boost health by slowing climate change, and thereby reduce the number of extreme storms like hurricanes and heat waves, which can lead to water and food shortages and deaths. Also, by boosting air quality, known as a “co-benefit,” there would be fewer premature deaths, heart attacks, asthma, and stroke.“The nice thing about these co-benefits is you get them immediately,” Buonocore said in the article.The plan, if adopted, promises to help reduce other climate-related public health issues, such as higher ozone levels, which can worsen respiratory problems like asthma, he told Wired in an August 4, 2015 article. “Ozone is usually a problem in the summer,” Buonocore said. “With climate change you’re basically extending the ozone season.”Federal officials say the Clean Power Plan by 2030 would prevent 1,500 to 3,600 premature deaths, 90,000 asthma attacks in children, 1,700 heart attacks, and 300,000 missed days of school and work.last_img read more

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UW track travels to California

first_imgThe members of the University of Wisconsin track team has put the indoor season behind them and has returned from spring break to ready themselves for the start of the outdoor campaignThis weekend, the well-rested men’s team will travel to California for the Stanford Invitational in Palo Alto. With this weekend’s event being just the second outdoor event thus far, athletes are still making the adjustments from what they were used to indoors. Head coach Ed Nuttycombe addressed alterations that come when making the switch to the outdoor season.“There are differences in both the individual and team perspectives, and there are obviously different events that take place outdoors,” Nuttycombe said. “There are a lot of changes that will begin to take place as we make the transition.”One of the major changes that will take place is the addition of certain athletes who will participate in unique outdoor events. The outdoor season brings about the opportunity for various field athletes to display their skills.“There will be some new names,” Nuttycombe said. “Robert Dehn will be making his appearance in the javelin, which is a completely outdoor event.”Dehn, a sophomore from Owatonna, Minn., was recently named Big Ten Field Athlete of the Week with his throw of 206 feet in the javelin at the Rose Hulman Early Bird. The move from indoors to outdoors will bring forth some new athletes, but Nuttycombe insisted the switch does little to affect the final results of individual performances.“From an individual perspective, most of the guys are running something similar, although there may be some small changes,” Nuttycombe said.For the upcoming event, Nuttycombe has decided to keep his distance runners from participating, allowing them some added time to recover from the stretch run of the indoor season.“We’re taking a very small group out,” Nuttycombe said. “We will probably take about half of a team to this meet.”One of the distance members who is readying himself for the start of the outdoor season is Zach Beth, a redshirt sophomore from Ladysmith, Wis. Beth was an integral part of the team’s success indoors and will look to use the time off over spring break to prepare for the outdoor portion of the season.“During spring break, we had five days completely off to let our legs recover and we are getting back into basic training now,” Beth said.The distance runners will benefit from the time off, especially after competing at such a high level towards the end of the indoor season. Nuttycombe and his coaching staff want athletes to get back to basics before the season resumes.“From a training perspective, most of the athletes have taken a couple steps back and have gone back to some base strength-type of training,” Nuttycombe said.This weekend’s meet will serve as another tune-up for the team as the next phase of the season begins. Although a large portion of the men’s team is still in the process of preparing for the outdoor season, Beth feels good about the direction the team is headed as well as his personal performance.“I think everyone is looking a lot more fit, and we should continue to perform at a high level,” Beth said. “In the outdoor season, I expect to keep improving and getting better.”last_img read more

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