Rugby World – August 2011 edition contents

first_imgMini Rugby: Get your youngsters stuck into rugby’s answer to golfFitness Zone: Increase your power and learn more about GPS trainingPre-season: Follow our six steps to have your best pre-season everThe Tourist: They’re the English champions – now Saracens need a home to do their team justiceEliota Sapolu: The mercurial Gloucester centre just can’t stop tweetingMalawi Rugby: Meet some rugby enthusiasts determined to make a differenceYouth rugby: Stephen Jones on some painful truths for English age-group rugby – and a drastic measureMunster: Photo-by-photo evidence of their Magners League triumphRBS Rugbyforce: Tom Palmer and Jason Leonard get stuck into redecorating at Yorkshire’s Wortley RUFCTuilagi Brothers: Matt Hampson talks the World Cup and brotherly rivalry with Leicester’s Alesana and ManuCoaching class: Will Greenwood and Austin Healey take a trip with some rugby-loving youngstersToby Faletau: Wales fans will be hoping that the young No 8 will keep doing his talking on the pitchScotland fans: Six fans speak out about the failings in the Scottish set-upRising Star: England U20 lock Charlie Matthews is relishing life as a full-time HarlequinThe Backs…Naked Truth: New England lock Mouritz Botha on his amazing journeyArmchair zone: The latest books and productsTour tale: A secret trip to the cinema———————————————————————————————————————————————–Click here to subscribe to Rugby World Click here to find out where to buy Rugby World Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. [imagebrowser id=12]Rugby World has a caught a large dose of World Cup fever this month with the second part of our sensational World Cup Guide, featuring the Wales, Fiji, South Africa, Samoa and Namibia pool. There’s nowhere else you’ll find interview with the coach and captain of every one of the World Cup sides, except in Rugby World. With the Guide it means another whopping 200-page issue to get you in the mood for New Zealand. We also speak to Mike Tindall, Mike Phillips, Rob Kearney and even travel to Australia with Chris Cusiter as he tries everything he can to kick start his World Cup campaign. In another packed issue the four stars are joined by a myriad of other players and coaches including Chris Wyles, Morgan Stoddart, Tomas O’Leary, Alasdair Strokosch, Eliota Sapolu, Manu Tuilagi and Toby Faletau. We also get the low-down on Scottish rugby from a panel of fans, pay homage to both Munster’s Magners League triumph and Saracens’ Aviva Premiership title in our Tourist Series.———————————————————————————————————————————————–The Front Row…30 minutes with Dave AttwoodFuture Faces: Matt Kvesic and Paddy JacksonAndy Blyth: The former Sale centre on climbing Mount KilimanjaroPaul Turner: What do Wales need to do to prevent another 92-0 defeat?John Kirwan: How rugby can give Japan hope after a year of tragedySteve Thompson and Neil Back: A trip to meet soldiers in Afghanistan made a big impact on two World Cup winners, says Sam PetersFrank Keating: What would England give for a modern-day Jeremy Guscott as the World Cup loomsSpotlight on…Chris Wyles: On-field success has been tinged by off-field sadness for Saracens’ USA Eagle. Sam Munnery reportsMorgan Stoddart: The Sacrlets full-back has enjoyed a second coming in 2011. So how has he done it, asks Sarah MockfordTomás O’Leary: After months of injury, the Munster No 9 is eager to realise his World Cup dream. By Bea AspreyAlasdair Strokosch: The flanker tells Katie Field why he won’t be holding back in his bid for a place in Scotland’s RWC squadThe Centres…Mike Tindall: The England centre on the World Cup, captaincy and marrying into the Royal FamilyMike Phillips: A new start is needed for the troubled Wales scrum-half, and first up is the World CupChris Cusiter: The scrum-half is fit and fresh after a trip Down Under, and wants his Scotland shirt backRob Kearney: Ireland’s full-back shares his experiences of Ethiopia, and reflects on the fickleness of lifeTechnical Zone: Defence starts at the ruck – Dan Cottrell has all the tipscenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Lions fixtures for 2017 New Zealand tour

first_img Tall order: The Lions were well beaten by the All Blacks in 2005 The Lions have announced their 10-match fixture list for 2017 tour. Unlike 2013, where they stopped off in Hong Kong for a sponsor-led fixture against the Barbarians, there will be no game en route, this despite the ARU offering up the Wallabies as an opponent and many calls for the Lions party to play a game in the Pacific Islands, especially after the successful visit of the All Blacks to Apia this week.With a coaching set-up still to be announced, it is one of the first building blocks in a tour, which is considered the toughest of all three. Lions fans will need no reminders about how tough it is to defeat the All Blacks on home soil – they have managed it only once in 1971 when John Dawes captained then to a 2-1 Series win – and on their last visit, under Sir Clive Woodward in 2005, they were destroyed 3-0 by Graham Henry‘s men, barely laying a glove on the All Blacks who were inspired by Dan Carter.After winning the Series against Australia in 2013, the Lions will start their assault on June 3, 2017 with a game against a Provincial Union XV in Whangarei and finish five weeks later at the 50,000 capacity Eden Park, their third and final game at the venue.Happy memories: The Lions beat the Wallabies in their last outing in 20132017 Lions Tour of New Zealand fixturesJune 3 – Provincial Union team (Toll Stadium, Whangarei)June 7 – Auckland Blues (Eden Park)June 10 – Crusaders (AMI Stadium, Christchurch) The Lions will kick-off an intimidating 10-match tour of New Zealand on June 3, 2017, in Whangarei. Can they win their first Series there in 46 years? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img July 1 – SECOND TEST v ALL BLACKS (Westpac Stadium)July 8 – THIRD TEST v ALL BLACKS (Eden Park) June 13 – Highlanders (Forsyth Barr Stadium, Dunedin)June 17 – Maori (Rotorua International Stadium)June 20 – Chiefs (Waikato Stadium, HamiltonJune 24 – FIRST TEST v ALL BLACKS (Eden Park)June 27 – Hurricanes (Westpac Stadium, Wellington)last_img read more

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Lions 2017: A look into All Blacks captain Kieran Read

first_img LIONS AND tigers. Both are prevalent for Kieran Read life right now. The first is obvious – the best players from Britain and Ireland head to New Zealand in a few weeks’ time for a ten-match tour that includes three Tests against the All Blacks, now led by Read – but the second is not so.Don’t worry, you haven’t missed another team being added to the Super Rugby roster with the moniker ‘Tigers’. In fact, this has nothing to do with rugby at all and is more focused on his family life.Read and his wife Bridget welcomed a son, Reuben, in January, a brother for their daughters Elle, six, and Eden, four. As well as bouncing on the trampoline and going on the swings, it transpires that the girls love play-acting – and like to get their dad involved too.Family man: Kieran Read with two of his kids after winning the 2015 World Cup“I have to be a prince all the time,” explains Read. “And Eden likes to play tiger families so we walk around the house on all fours – she’s the baby tiger and I’m the daddy tiger. If I don’t do it right, they’re my biggest critics! I love being a dad. My girls are great fun and keep me completely grounded.”Read recognises the importance of family time, not least because it allows him to escape the pressures of elite rugby in general and captaining the All Blacks in particular. His daughters are more interested in the anthems and the haka than the minutiae of Test rugby, so time at home, which he enjoyed more of at the start of this year as he recovered from wrist surgery before returning to action last month, is the perfect way to switch off.“For me, probably the hardest thing is to step out and relax – you can focus too much on footy,” admits the 31-year-old No 8. “I just try to take my mind off the All Blacks and things like that. I’ve had to really focus on that but it’s key.“I’m lucky I’ve got a wife and kids to take my mind off things pretty quickly. When you’re away so much, it’s always great to come home and relax with the family. We don’t watch rugby at home and don’t talk about rugby; I just switch off, which is quite cool.”In the sheds: Read with his team-mates in the All Blacks changing roomIt will be hard for Read to switch off from rugby at all in June and July, however. The British & Irish Lions are coming to town and that will dominate life in New Zealand for six weeks.Read was out of the country for the 2005 tour, when the All Blacks took Clive Woodward’s side to the cleaners (or insert any other cliche for a thrashing here). He was in Argentina with the New Zealand U21 side and only caught the highlights, but they were enough to be able to namecheck Dan Carter for his “pretty special performances” in that series. Twelve years on, however, he is fully aware of the building excitement.“I missed the whole vibe in 2005, what it meant to Kiwis and New Zealand,” he remembers. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a player to be involved and it’s going to be huge, massive.”So what is he expecting from a Lions squad that includes several members of the Ireland side that inflicted a first defeat on Read as All Blacks captain last autumn? “The Lions are putting the best of the best together and they will be capable of playing an open brand of rugby. The style of play in the northern hemisphere has been really positive, and traditionally they back their forwards and their defence.“We only experienced playing against the Irish (last autumn) but they played a good style and put a lot of pressure on us by holding onto the ball. England are at a great level at the moment and have been going really well. It’s a big challenge for us.”It was thought that 2016 would be a ‘transition year’ for the All Blacks. A raft of experienced players had left for pastures new after winning the World Cup, the likes of Richie McCaw, Dan Carter, Ma’a Nonu and Conrad Smith either retiring or heading to France. Yet the predicted struggles never materialised. They lost only one of their 14 games – to Ireland in Chicago – and players already familiar with the set-up filled the holes. For example, Aaron Cruden and Beauden Barrett filled the No 10 shirt while Sam Cane, who has captained the All Blacks, was picked at openside. A few new faces did come in too – there were 11 New Zealand debutants in 2016 but only two of those were in the starting XV for their first Test. Steve Hansen and his back-room team had clearly prepared for this eventuality and had done so, as the Kiwis do with so many things, superbly. Crusader: Kieran Read playing for the Crusaders against the Highlanders“If you’d told me at the start of the year we’d lose only one Test, I’d have taken that and been very happy with it,” says Read. “To be a rebuilding year, I’m pretty happy with how that went. We’re lucky we planned it. With all the experience we lost, we had guys who were gradually introduced into the squad.“The other thing is we have a great squad. There are guys with potential who are not playing Tests every week but they’re all capable of starting for a lot of other teams. That pushes us during the week to train harder. The expectation is when you come into the All Blacks you raise your game; you’re not allowed to come in and sit where you are. When young guys come in and perform, you’re on track. It’s a great culture.”It’s a successful culture, too. Back-to-back World Cups, 18 consecutive Test wins before that defeat by Ireland, unbeaten at Eden Park since 1994, 47 of the 50 best win percentages in Test history (for those playing at least 20 games) recorded by New Zealand players… the All Blacks set the standard in rugby.And Read sets high standards for himself, both as a captain – a role he took on full-time last year following McCaw’s retirement – and as a player.Read is regarded not only as one of the world’s best No 8s but one of the world’s best players, full stop. In fact, Stuart Barnes waxed lyrical about his abilities in this magazine last year, ranking only Aaron Smith above him and saying: “He has taken forwards’ offloading to unseen levels. In recent years, what Read has conjured between the five-metre line and touchline is little short of magical.”His handling is hugely impressive, which is why the All Blacks so often position him in the wide channels (find out more about that attacking tactic over the page). If he doesn’t get over the line himself, more often than not he is able to deliver the pinpoint pass for a team-mate to cross. Yet – and this is a warning for Warren Gatland – Read feels he didn’t contribute enough in attack in 2016 and is eager to get more involved this year.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE“I’d love to get my hands on the ball more again and showcase a bit more attacking flair. That’s a big part of my game. Last year I was working hard in different areas, like defence, and it’s about getting opportunities and finding room to get in those positions. I’ve been working quite hard with Ian Foster (All Blacks assistant coach) on that. As a No 8, you always want to be a master of all trades and make sure you have a consistent game.”As for leadership, Read says he “enjoys the challenge of captaining this team” and, while learning a lot from McCaw, he does things his way now he’s in the role. There is also an individual milestone on the horizon. If all goes to plan, Read will win his 100th cap in the third Test against the Lions at Eden Park on 8 July, becoming the seventh All Black to hit three figures. He’s aware of the significance of the achievement but is not thinking of ending things there – the 2019 World Cup is firmly in his sights.“I always wanted to be a great All Black, but I never thought about playing 100 Tests. When I started no one had played 100 times for the All Blacks so I didn’t really think of it at all. When I think back to my first Test and my 50th, they were extra special. It will be a cool day and a great honour for myself and my family, but the one thing you remember is the result. I’d get rid of all the games to win the (Lions) series. It’s more important to win for the All Blacks than for myself.”Off the mark: Kieran Read on the hoof against WalesSo does he see himself overtaking McCaw’s world record of 148 caps? “It’s probably out of my reach! All going well, I hope to be around until the next World Cup. I want to keep contributing and making sure the team move forward. I want to continue to improve as a player and a person and see this team get better. We have a great tradition of leaving the team in a better place than when we came in. That’s essentially our motivation as a group. Whenever we play, it’s our chance to make our legacy as best as we can.” Talk of legacy then turns to Read’s own heroes and one particular moment has stuck with him since he was a child. Michael Jones, the All Black great, handed out prizes at Read’s local club, Drury, south of Auckland, when he was seven or eight. Read, of course, won a trophy, had his photo taken with Jones and says: “I remember being in awe of how kind he was. I’ve always remembered that and try to use that as an All Black now. It makes you realise the reach you have, especially with children, and you want to be as positive as you can.”Whether he is playing against Lions or playing a tiger, Kieran Read is inspiring children across the country and close to home. Force of nature: All Blacks captain Kieran Read, mid-haka center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As he prepares for the visit of the Lions and his 100th Test, we find out what makes All Blacks captain Kieran Read tick both on and off the pitch. This interview first appeared in the June 2017 issue of Rugby World magazine. last_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup: Ireland 27-3 Scotland

first_imgFamiliar foes did battle in this Pool A clash in Yokohama – here’s all you need to know Going green: Jacob Stockdale gets past Scotland defenders with Conor Murray in support (Getty Images) 2019 Rugby World Cup: Ireland 27-3 ScotlandHead-to-headPlayed – 136Ireland wins – 64Scotland wins – 67Draws – 5Did You Know?Ireland beat more than twice as many defenders as Scotland – 17 to eight – while the Scots made three times as many offloads with nine to Ireland’s three.Plus, Ireland maintained their record of converting half-time leads to match wins… Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn a nutshellIreland’s defence came to the fore as they comfortably saw off their Six Nations rivals in Yokohama, not only scoring four tries for the bonus point but preventing Scotland from crossing the whitewash.It was the power and precision of Ireland’s forwards that put them in a strong position at half-time. All three of their tries came from tight-five forwards and all three from close range.James Ryan was the first to score, his low position allowing him to get under the Scottish defence. Captain Rory Best followed him onto the scoresheet when he rolled over from a driving maul in the corner. There were question marks over the grounding but Wayne Barnes assured the Scots it had been checked by the TMO.On the line: Tadhg Furlong scores Ireland’s third try (Getty Images)Tadhg Furlong completed the tight-five hat-trick, just reaching the line following a short burst in the 25th minute.All Scotland could manage in the first half was a solitary Greig Laidlaw penalty as Ireland’s hard-hitting defensive line shut down attacks.With Hamish Watson, one of their best players, having to leave the field just before half-time after suffering a nasty-looking injury at the breakdown, it didn’t look good for the men in blue.With mist and fine rain descending at half-time, handling errors hampered the Scots’ ability to spread the ball wide and they couldn’t build momentum in their attacking game. Ireland capitalised on any error, playing to their set-piece and kicking strengths.They had to wait a while for the all-important fourth try but in the 56th minute, a few phases after a high ball slipped through Sean Maitland ‘s fingers, Andrew Conway crossed in the corner. There was a glimpse of a chance for Scotland when Chris Harris and Stuart Hogg combined to reach the Irish 22, and Tadhg Beirne was sin-binned for a breakdown infringement. Yet from the ensuing penalty, Scotland kicked for a five-metre lineout, worked a set play down the blind side, lost possession and conceded a penalty themselves to allow Ireland to relieve the pressure.Scotland had a few more chances in the final ten minutes with a series of five-metre lineouts but could find no way through the green wall.Wrapped up: Sean Maitland is tackled by Josh van der Flier and Jordan Larmour (Getty Images)Star manChris Farrell didn’t start this match but arrived as a replacement midway through the first half and made a big impression in attack and defence. He’s an uncompromising tackler and thwarted several Scottish attacks. And when he got possession, he made ground – whether a few metres while taking contact or a long burst into open space. What you could call an impact substitute.Related: Rugby World Cup TV CoverageReady for action: The teams line up for the anthems in Yokohama (Getty Images)The ReactionIreland coach Joe Schmidt: “I was delighted with the first half. We really put some pressure on. We had to soak a bit up too.“We put together about 15 line breaks. The one frustration is we didn’t finish on the back of enough of those, but in these conditions in the second half I was delighted to see Andrew Conway get over in the corner. It just gave us the buffer and the bonus point, which could be important in the pool later on.”Scotland coach Gregor Townsend: “When you go behind against a team like Ireland, who are very good at staying in front, then it’s always going to be difficult and it was obviously very difficult in the second half with the rain.“Really it was that first 20 minutes: we didn’t set the tone with our energy and Ireland took their chances and the game was very difficult to come back from there.”The TeamsIreland: Jordan Larmour; Andrew Conway, Garry Ringrose, Bundee Aki (Chris Farrell 21), Jacob Stockdale; Johnny Sexton (Jack Carty 57), Conor Murray (Luke McGrath 57); Cian Healy (David Kilcoyne 50), Rory Best (captain), Tadhg Furlong (Andrew Porter 50), Iain Henderson (Tadhg Beirne 57), James Ryan, Peter O’Mahony (Jack Conan 28), Josh Van der Flier (Jack Conan 14-22, Niall Scannell 73), CJ Stander.Tries: Ryan 7, Best 16, Furlong 25, Conway 56. Cons: Sexton, Murray. Pen: Carty.Yellow card: Beirne 69min.Scotland: Stuart Hogg; Tommy Seymour (Darcy Graham 57), Duncan Taylor (Chris Harris 65), Sam Johnson, Sean Maitland; Finn Russell, Greig Laidlaw (Ali Price 62); Allan Dell (Gordon Reid 62), Stuart McInally (captain), Willem Nel (Simon Berghan 53), Grant Gilchrist, Jonny Gray (Scott Cummings 65), John Barclay (Blade Thomson 53), Hamish Watson (Fraser Brown 38), Ryan Wilson.Pen: Laidlaw.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup: Wales 35-13 Uruguay

first_imgAlso make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. TAGS: Uruguay Centre Parkes wasn’t the only one whose radar was off. The Wales display was littered with wayward passes and knock-ons, and the match simply wasn’t a great spectacle as the numerous errors resulted in a fractured game.Credit here must also paid to the Uruguay defence, which has been effective for much of this tournament.The Uruguayans tackle low and usually in pairs, which means ball-carriers are brought to ground rather than being able to make a few extra metres and get an offload away. Plus, Uruguay are then in a good position to slow the ball down at the ruck and duly won a few turnovers and penalties for holding on.Wales led only 7-6 at the break – a converted Nicky Smith try from close range in the 17th minute putting the men in red ahead before two Felipe Berchesi penalties closed the gap.First act: Justin Tipuric congratulates Nicky Smith for scoring the opening try (Getty Images)It took Wales more than 30 minutes to add to their score, Josh Adams crossing close to the 50-minute mark after a big carry from Bradley Davies. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Line-up: The teams get ready for the anthems in Kumamoto (Getty Images) center_img A penalty try followed a quarter of an hour later as Wales took advantage of Santiago Civetta being sin-binned to launch their driving maul and referee Angus Gardner ran under the posts as Uruguay infringed.Uruguay hit back when down to 14 men, though, and attacked from a five-metre lineout of their own. German Kessler was the man who touched the ball down.Wales finished with two tries from the two scrum-halves on the bench – Tomos Williams crossing after an initial break from Leigh Halfpenny and Gareth Davies running in a solo score from close to halfway following a quick tap penalty to close out the game.It gave the scoreline a more comfortable feel from Wales’ perspective but the match would have made uncomfortable viewing for Gatland.He can kick it: Uruguay fly-half Felipe Berchesi kicked well against Wales (Getty Images)Star ManLeigh Halfpenny got the official Man of the Match award and was Wales’ best player, but we’re opting for Andres Vilaseca. At the forefront of a determined and proud Uruguay side, the inside-centre carried hard when Uruguay were pinned in their own half and was regularly used to crash ball forward from scrums. Plus, he was a strong figure in defence.Related: Rugby World Cup TV CoverageThe ReactionWales coach Warren Gatland: “It’s about creating momentum and while it wasn’t the prettiest performance tonight, we dug in and we had some quality come off the bench. The scoreline probably reflected the difference of the two teams.“I have to take my hat off to Uruguay. They were tenacious and never gave up, making tackles and competing bard. They’re a tough outfit to put away.”Uruguay coach Esteban Meneses: “Our aim was to show our evolution through our play and performance, and I think we achieved that. We were able to play on a par with Wales and hang in there until half-time. In the second half, the score widened but we were also able to give a shock to Wales. We were able to display the spirit and DNA that is within us.”The TeamsWales: Leigh Halfpenny; Josh Adams (Gareth Davies 69), Owen Watkin, Hadleigh Parkes, Hallam Amos; Rhys Patchell, Aled Davies (Tomos Williams 60); Nicky Smith (Rhys Carre 52), Ryan Elias (Elliot Dee 52), Dillon Lewis (Wyn Jones 64), Bradley Davies, Adam Beard, Aaron Shingler, Justin Tipuric (captain, James Davies 60), Aaron Wainwright (Ross Moriarty 60).Tries: Smith 17, Adams 49, penalty 66, Williams 74, G Davies 84. Cons: Halfpenny 4.Uruguay: Gaston Mieres (Rodrigo Silva 64); Leandro Leivas, Juan Manuel Cat (Tomas Inciarte 73), Andres Vilaseca (Juan Echeverria 78), Nicolas Freitas; Felipe Berchesi, Santiago Arata (Agustin Ormaechea 58); Mateo Sanguinetti, German Kessler (Guillermo Pujadas 76), Diego Arbelo (Juan Pedro Rombys 52), Ignacio Dotti (Diego Magno 58), Manuel Leindekar, Juan Manuel Gaminara (captain), Santiago Civetta, Alejandro Nieto (Manuel Diana 58).Try: Kessler 71. Con: Berchesi. Pens: Berchesi 2.Yellow card: Civetta 65min.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. 2019 Rugby World Cup: Wales 35-13 UruguayHead-to-headPlayed – 2Wales wins -2Uruguay wins – 0Did You Know?Justin Tipuric captained Wales for the first time.The 13 changes made to the starting XV that played against Fiji is the most Wales have ever made at a Rugby World Cup.Andres Vilaseca and Juan Manuel Gaminara made their eighth World Cup appearances – a Uruguay record. Agustin Ormaechea and Rodrigo Silva joined them when they came off the bench.Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn A NutshellYes, this was a much-changed Wales team. Yes, Wales had already booked their place in the quarter-finals. Yes, Uruguay had nothing to lose in their final match of this World Cup.Yet even taking all that into account this was a poor performance from Wales. Below-par would be too kind a description and it’s the opposite of how Warren Gatland would have wanted his side to build towards a last-eight tie against France in Oita next weekend.Rather than these fringe players putting their hands up for inclusion for the quarter-final match-day 23, there will have been a few black marks left next to names as they start preparations for the French match.Wales probably made more errors in this 80 minutes than they had in their three other pool matches combined. Twice Hallam Amos crossed the line, twice the try was ruled out for a forward pass from Hadleigh Parkes. And Amos made it a hat-trick of non-tries by dropping the ball over the line in the closing minutes. Wales make hard work of beating Uruguay in their final group game but will play France in the quarter-finalslast_img read more

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Saracens relegated from Premiership – and docked further 70 points

first_imgSaracens were fined £5.3m and docked 35 points in November after the initial investigation found breaches in the past three seasons, but further sanctions have been imposed in recent weeks.Of the decision to relegate Saracens, Premiership Rugby chief executive Darren Childs said: “Premiership Rugby is prepared to take strong action to enforce the regulations governing fair competition between our clubs. At the conclusion of dialogue with Saracens about their compliance with the salary cap regulations, it has been decided that Saracens will be relegated at the end of this season. The squad: Saracens players in a huddle at Allianz Park (Getty Images) TAGS: Saracens Let us know what you think of the decision by emailing [email protected] Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Updated: Saracens relegated from PremiershipSaracens will be relegated from the Gallagher Premiership at the end of the season – and have been docked a further 70 points for salary cap breaches.Premiership Rugby confirmed the relegation decision on 18 January and then ten days later announced that Saracens had received a further deduction of 70 points, ensuring they will finish this season in 12th position in the table.The decision followed discussions with the RFU and was made “in order to provide clarity for clubs and supporters”.News of the 70-point deduction was preceded by the resignation of Saracens interim CEO Ed Griffiths, who said: “This was always going to be a very short-term appointment, and others are well-placed to drive forward the rebuilding of the club.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “At the same time as enforcing the existing regulations, we want to ensure a level playing field for all clubs in the future, which is why we have asked Lord Myners to carry out an independently-led review of the salary cap. As part of this process, we will soon be announcing an open consultation so that everyone involved in the game has the opportunity to contribute to its future.“The actions that we have taken – dealing with breaches of the current regulations and reviewing the system for the future – will help us to build a stronger league and uphold the confidence of supporters.”Euro campaign: Saracens in Champions Cup action against the Ospreys (Getty Images)Saracens will continue to compete in the Premiership for the rest of the season and will play in the European Champions Cup quarter-finals in April.Saracens chairman Neil Golding said: “As the new chairman of Saracens I acknowledge the club has made errors in the past and we unreservedly apologise for those mistakes.“I and the rest of the board are committed to overseeing stringent new governance measures to ensure regulatory compliance going forward.” Exeter Chairman Tony Rowe told BBC Devon: “They’ve taken relegation. They had two choices: they could either open up their books for a forensic audit, or they could take relegation. So it was their choice. They have decided to take relegation.” Premiership Rugby confirms further punishment for salary cap breacheslast_img read more

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Church in Brazil gives Lent environmental focus

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Church in Brazil gives Lent environmental focus Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church in Brazil – the Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil – has teamed up with its national ecumenical partners to focus on the environment in the run-up to Easter. In his Lent message, the Primate of Brazil, Archbishop Francisco de Assis da Silva, says that members of the National Council of Christian Churches in Brazil had adopted Our Common Home: Our Responsibility as their theme for their Lent reflections.“This topic is a recurrent theme not only in the Anglican Communion but in the World Council of Churches, in the Orthodox Church, as well as in in other religions,” Archbishop da Silva says. “Our society is more and more concerned with the course our civilization is taking in terms of the sustainability of life.“To take care of nature is to have proactive attitudes in the care of the environment, and it is an essential part of our witness as Anglicans. This is imperative for us as individuals, as well as communities, dioceses, and provinces.“In order to confront the neglect of the environment, it requires that we exercise our civil duty as citizens that we demand from our political leaders the use of adequate resources to improve the quality of life of the people. This means to ask that the well-being of the society as a whole be prioritized instead of fostering a culture of profits for the sake of profiting.”Archbishop da Silva said that a “lack of public policies regarding basic sanitation and waste Management” was the fundamental cause of the spread of the Zika and Chikungunya viruses, along with “the responsible way in which the sources and courses of our rivers and springs are managed.”He continued: “All this could be overcome with education and public policies that take into consideration the preservation of the environment.”He recommended the Anglican Communion Environmental Network’s Carbon Fast for Lent with its forty challenges to “reduce actions that damage God’s creation” along with daily scripture and prayer. “I recommend that these challenges be taken on by the whole Church,” he said. “These are simple steps and gestures that reduce carbon emissions, one of the main causes of the climate change.” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA South America Environment & Climate Change, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit an Event Listing Lent, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Posted Feb 11, 2016 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

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Canada: Emotions run high as error reverses vote on same-sex…

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Canada: Emotions run high as error reverses vote on same-sex marriage by Marites N. SisonPosted Jul 13, 2016 Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Samir Bulus Idris Tia says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Human Sexuality, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 14, 2016 at 3:29 am May God lead the Church the way he has sent His son for. The Church, the Anglican Church in particular must work with one mind, spirit, faith, bible and church. Because there is one God. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Same-Sex Marriage Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL [Anglican Journal] The General Synod plenary hall was a cauldron of emotions after Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, announced with finality that an error in the July 11 count of the vote on the motion allowing same-sex marriage had been made, and that, in fact, it had been approved, not rejected.There was palpable anger on the faces of some members, weariness in others. Others smiled and quietly exchanged hugs. Some simply looked stunned.A few visibly upset members stood up to leave the plenary hall.The Anglican Journal interviewed members from both sides of the divide to get their reactions:Shara Golden, Diocese of FrederictonI might not have agreed with all the processes, but I do believe that when something is wrong and you can fix it, you fix it. It was a hard way to have it happen for where I thought it should go, but I would want someone to say we’re going to fix it, if it was the other way.I didn’t vote for the resolution … but I wouldn’t be happy if I knew that we had done things wrong. That’s not what God would want. He’d want us to be honest and upright. I will live with the results, I will.Bishop William Anderson, Diocese of CaledoniaThey did what they had to do in terms of trying to correct the record so I have no issue with that. What I do have an issue with is that last night when the thinking was that the vote got in the way, a number of bishops announced that they were simply going to ignore the results, they were going to defy the decision of synod and… go ahead and approve [same-sex] marriages.Well, today, the situation is reversed, with the correction of the record, so the question I would be asking is, “Does this mean in fact that they are going to withhold consent for the marriages until this passes second reading in three years?”I think this process has been immensely destructive of the unity of our church. I think people are going to go away wounded and if the dioceses that said they’re going to go ahead anyway now will go ahead even though now they have won the vote, it further exacerbates the contempt for our synodical process. I think we’re in for a period of chaos and I think that’s not going to be helpful for the church.Q: What will you be telling your diocese?The practical side of it is pretty straightforward. I have no reason to believe that it was not an honest error, a technical error, and so the vote is what the vote was. People need to deal with that.I think the bigger problem is the one that flows from all the dioceses that said last night they were simply going to go ahead. What that says to my people is, “Well, we have a process where this has to pass at two successive synods, but some dioceses have decided they’re just going to go ahead, anyway.” Which begs the question, why are we even involved in a synodical process in deciding something like this if, to be very cynical, some bishops are going to make themselves mini popes who can decide doctrine on their own?Dean Iain Luke, Diocese of AthabascaThe irony is that before the whole synod started, people were saying it’s a “lose-lose” situation. Everybody knows what it feels like now. Both sides have understood now what it feels like to lose, if you have to use that word. One side ends up not getting their way, but the other side knows what it feels like. For a day they felt that and I hope that that will help us.The most important thing going ahead is that we bring those two groups of people together, that people see the leadership of those two groups working together to find one story for our church. It would be terrible if there were two stories of this synod, because two stories lead to two churches. We need one story, one church. But to do that, people have to see that both sides are working together to tell that story.Why did it happen this way? There must be something for us to learn from.Canon Travis Enright, Diocese of EdmontonI arrived here with much trepidation either way, no matter how the vote was going to go because I think we’ve forgotten how to love in dialogue and our structures are so completely parliamentary. It’s about argument and right and wrong… so now we’re forced into a little tube to see each other not as beloved, not as cared for, but as opponents.I think moving forward, the church has got to see this. In the last 24 hours, in the fullness of the ‘no, no, yes, no,’ it caused so much confusion that it hurt and there’s no place for a reconciling word where I can go with my brothers and sisters. How can we find space for each other? How can we truly find space for each other vs. this is a canon and we’re going to do this, anyway? Or we’re going to have proclamations or we’re going to have scriptural recommendations. That is not, I think, how this beloved church should be run moving forward.Q: What needs to be done then? What are you advocating for?I would probably advocate not something legislative, not even consensus work. There are other models. There’s one particularly Cree way of doing things called Wicheowin, which means, How do you share together? At the end of it when we come to a concern, it’s not that you prove yourself, it’s how can you live together. How can you live through this together?We talk a lot about self-determination. I think the whole church needs to go through a period of self-determination. The whole church needs to find out what it means to live contextually on this particular land and know that there are many, many voices – conservatism, liberalism, within Indigenous communities, within urban communities, rural communities – and that we’re not simply a monoculture. We have to figure out ways to have connecting points.Bishop Michael Bird, Diocese of OttawaObviously, I can’t help but be grateful for the resolution passing because it’s not a vote, behind that are the witness that we give as a church to LGBTQ [Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning] community and their friends and their families. That is welcome news to me.On the other hand, I know that we come away from synod [with] many people feeling confused and hurt because the result is different… We’ll need to go back and pray for synod and hope that we can continue to walk together in new and inspiring ways.Q: Are you still going ahead with same-sex marriages in your dioceses?I haven’t changed my mind on that at this point. This has just happened so I haven’t really given much thought yet about what the next [steps are]… I will be talking to some of our senior staff and seeing how, if any way, this will alter that. But at this stage, I basically made my decision now and I’m going forward with it.I don’t believe that this canon, in its present form, prohibits the action that I have announced.The motion having passed and even regardless of which way it went, there was a strong majority of people voting in favor, so I can take that as strong encouragement.Bishop John Chapman, Diocese of OttawaQ: Will the diocese go ahead with decision to allow same-sex marriages?It doesn’t change anything we’re planning to do in the diocese of Ottawa, except that I am now pleased that we’re now moving in a direction that is sanctioned by the whole body of the church. It was sanctioned – over 70% voted anyway before,  so I felt comfortable… I felt like it was the right thing to do, it’s the pastorally right thing to do in the diocese of Ottawa… Now I’m moving ahead doing it… knowing that there’s a two-thirds majority support in all three houses.Q: If as the General Synod chancellor said the canon doesn’t prohibit same-sex marriages, why was it necessary to go through what some have described as a painful process?A: I wish that the matter was presented to synod as a pastoral matter from the very beginning and not as a canonical issue…Bishop Melissa Skelton, Diocese of New WestminsterIt was surprising. My part of this was I reviewed the list of clergy and noticed there were four names that recorded no vote, one of whom was someone I was pretty sure had voted in the affirmative… I was kind of involved in it…as this was happening behind the scenes, coming to light. Others were doing the recounting of the votes, which I didn’t even think to do. I was looking for what was odd about having four names of clergy, who didn’t have a vote recorded. I thought, something’s wrong.So what do I think about it? Because I voted in the affirmative I feel like I’m in this strange new world. So relieved, but so concerned that others are having the experience today that I had last night, which was feeling quite downhearted… about where to go with that.For my part, I’m relieved that I can go back to my diocese and say to our gay and lesbian people that we have taken an affirmative step on this. In my province, and among my friends in the house of bishops, I’m very concerned for those who feel that they’re not ready for that. How do we continue to make room for their point of view in a sensitive and caring way?Q: What would you say to the public who’s perplexed about what just happened?Technology has bugs, what can I tell you. It does. And even when it’s this refined and it’s carefully thought out and I fully agree with what the primate said that [the general secretary, Archdeacon] Michael Thompson and those who provided the technical aspect, I’m sure they worked very hard. Any of us who run senates know that it’s fraught with ways that it cannot live up to the perfection we had wanted it to be. It makes quite the story, doesn’t it? In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

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Historic gathering of the Portuguese speaking dioceses of Africa

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Rachel MashPosted Dec 5, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] Young people from three Portuguese speaking dioceses in Mozambique and Angola have this week taken part in a historic first joint meeting. The two countries are both Portuguese-speaking, but as they are separated by more than 1,200 miles, contacts between them have been few up to now. But now young people from the dioceses of Lebombo, Niassa and Angola, gathered from Nov. 25-30 at the diocesan center in Maciene, in the Mozambique province of Gaza.Full article. Africa, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Historic gathering of the Portuguese speaking dioceses of Africa Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

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El Obispo Primado rinde tributo al presidente George Herbert Walker…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group La siguiente declaración del obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal Michael Curry es un tributo al presidente George Herbert Walker Bush.Con una nación agradecida, y muchas personas de todo el mundo, nosotros los de la Iglesia Episcopal le damos gracias a Dios, fuente de vida y amor, por la vida, y el testimonio público y privado, del presidente George Herbert Walker Bush.A través de su perdurable dedicación al servicio público y de su incondicional devoción a su familia, él vivió el camino de Jesús a lo largo de una vida moldeada en la fe, la esperanza y, sobre todo, en el amor. Mediante su inquebrantable servicio a nuestro país y a la comunidad humana en todo el planeta, él encarnó los más nobles ideales de su fe y de su patria.El presidente Bush será un perenne recordatorio de que virtudes tales como la generosidad, la amabilidad y la bondad están entre las cosas que realmente perduran, y que trazan el camino de nuestra existencia como la familia humana de Dios.En él hemos contemplado un alma grande, que nos ha recordado la esperanza, por la gracia de Dios, de poder vivir de igual manera.Que su alma y las almas de todos los difuntos descansen en paz y resuciten en gloria. Amén.Obispo primado Michael CurryIglesia Episcopal Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Faith & Politics, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Dec 3, 2018 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis El Obispo Primado rinde tributo al presidente George Herbert Walker Bush Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

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