Treasury: Comprehensive Housing Finance Reform Must Be Built on Core Principles

first_img Treasury: Comprehensive Housing Finance Reform Must Be Built on Core Principles  Print This Post Antonio WeissAmid many calls from housing industry stakeholders and politicians alike in the last few years to end the FHFA’s conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, a top Treasury official said on Friday that the Obama Administration believes that any comprehensive housing finance reform that occurs must be built on a set of established core principles.Speaking at the Consumer Federation of America’s Annual Financial Services Conference in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Antonio Weiss, Counselor to the Treasury Secretary, stated that the housing finance system remains “the great unfinished business” of financial reform. He noted that the Administration stands behind a set of core principles for housing finance reform:Those core principles include:Providing broad access to long-term, fixed rate lending in all communities through all economic cycles.Limiting taxpayer exposure to an explicit, appropriately-priced guarantee to ensure against catastrophic risk.Maintaining a level playing field for community banks and credit unions, which know how best to serve their customers.Weiss noted the most significant bipartisan legislative effort at comprehensive finance reform, introduced in 2014 by Senators Tim Johnson (D-South Dakota) and Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), passed out of the Senate Banking Committee but never received a full floor vote. While Weiss said he believed this bill embodied several of the core principles laid out by the Administration, at the same time he noted that many have expressed concerns about the bill.“Chief among them was a concern that it would not do enough to meet the needs of traditionally underserved markets,” Weiss said. “While the GSEs’ business model is flawed, much of what they do to promote access and affordability is effective. FHFA has reflected a commitment to these important priorities, including their promulgation of duty-to-serve requirements, an essential catalyst to do more to address borrowers with low to moderate income. We believe a new system should build upon the existing policies that are already working.”Weiss said others believe the bill should have done more to ensure a level playing field between smaller firms and larger financial institutions. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily “We recognize that prospects for achieving a bipartisan path forward in the near-term are dim. But we still must lay the groundwork for a future system.”Antonio Weiss, Counselor to the Treasury Secretary“Expanding a future housing finance system to include smaller institutions has benefits beyond safeguarding the economy,” Weiss said. “Community banks, credit unions, and local lenders are closer to many borrowers outside the purview of the largest lenders. They are in a unique position to assess and address the credit needs of their customer base. This can lead to more effective risk assessment, and better outcomes for borrowers and investors.”Weiss reiterated his stance against Treasury allowing for the recapitalization of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and releasing them from the FHFA’s conservatorship, stating that “This approach is simply a bad deal for taxpayers and homeowners alike.” Weiss published an editorial in Bloomberg View in October insisting that the so-called “recap and release” of the GSEs would not happen during the final year of the Obama Administration and that it was a bad idea because it would not increase access to the housing market for creditworthy borrowers, taxpayers have not been fully repaid for the $187.5 billion bailout the GSEs received in 2008, and the cost of obtaining a mortgage would go up since it would take decades for the GSEs to build safe and sound levels of capital.Until housing finance reform that is built on those core principles can occur, the Administration and FHFA have engaged in a series of “administrative actions” to reduce the risk to taxpayers in the housing market, one of which is winding down the legacy investment portfolio of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Weiss also noted the “steady progress” the GSEs have made in implementing risk-sharing transactions that “aim to reduce taxpayer risk and revive the role of private capital in the housing market.”“We remain committed to working with Congress on housing reform that meets our core principles,” Weiss said. “We recognize that prospects for achieving a bipartisan path forward in the near-term are dim. But we still must lay the groundwork for a future system.” December 4, 2015 1,029 Views Previous: What Changes Are Coming to the CFPB’s Consumer Complaint Database? Next: Will 2016 Bring Unwelcome Surprises for the Housing Market? Home / Daily Dose / Treasury: Comprehensive Housing Finance Reform Must Be Built on Core Principles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac Housing Finance Reform U.S. Department of Treasurycenter_img Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac Housing Finance Reform U.S. Department of Treasury 2015-12-04 Brian Honea Subscribelast_img read more

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Freddie Mac Resumes Risk Sharing in 2016 Where Last Year Left Off

first_img Share Save Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. January 5, 2016 1,168 Views Credit Risk Transfer Freddie Mac STACR Program Structured Agency Credit Risk Program 2016-01-05 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Freddie Mac Resumes Risk Sharing in 2016 Where Last Year Left Off Previous: Will Existing-Home Sales Bounce Back from the Recent Disappointment? Next: How Does the SFR Market Look Going into 2016? The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Freddie Mac Resumes Risk Sharing in 2016 Where Last Year Left Offcenter_img About Author: Brian Honea Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Credit Risk Transfer Freddie Mac STACR Program Structured Agency Credit Risk Program The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Freddie Mac’s Structured Agency Credit Risk (STACR) series, which began in mid-2013 as a way to reduce the Enterprise’s exposure to credit risk and bring private investors back into the single-family mortgage market, has picked up in 2016 right where it left off in 2015.According to a press release issued on Tuesday, Freddie Mac has announced its intention to sell its first STACR debt notes offering of 2016, STACR Series 2016-DNA1, which is valued at $996 million. It is the 17th STACR offering since the program began two and a half years ago.The offering consists of a reference pool of recently acquired single-family mortgages with an unpaid principal balance (UPB) totaling about $35.7 billion, according to Freddie Mac. The transaction is scheduled to settle on January 21, 2016.“We have demonstrated our ability to execute credit risk transactions on a regular basis with a standard structure and have been transparent in our disclosures,” said Mike Reynolds, Freddie Mac vice president of Credit Risk Transfer. “Our loans are subject to Freddie Mac’s underwriting standards, internal fraud prevention and quality control review process. We are finding with each issuance that STACR is more diverse, liquid and durable.”The 17 STACR offerings, combined with two Whole Loan Security (WLS) offerings and 14 Agency Credit Insurance Structure (ACIS) transactions, has resulted in the transferring of a substantial portion of credit risk on more than $385 billion of UPB in single-family mortgages backed by Freddie Mac.Freddie Mac was the first agency to market credit risk transfer transactions through STACR, WLS, and ACIS programs. In two and a half years, Freddie Mac’s investor base has grown to include approximately 190 unique investors, which includes reinsurers.Freddie Mac’s fellow GSE, Fannie Mae, has followed Freddie Mac’s lead for credit risk transfer with two programs, the Connecticut Avenue Securities (CAS) Series and the Credit Insurance Risk Transfer (CIRT) program. Through six CIRT transactions since the program’s inception in 2014, Fannie Mae has acquired more than $1.2 billion of coverage on more than $46 billion of loans. Through the CAS Series, Fannie Mae has sold more than $12.4 billion in securities to private investors, which covers $438 billion worth of mortgage loans since the program’s inception in September 2013. Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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Castle & Cooke Mortgage Expands in Utah

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Previous: Is There any Silver Lining to be Found in Ocwen’s 2015 Earnings Report? Next: Computershare Acquires Altavera Mortgage Services Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Castle & Cooke Mortgage Castle & Cooke Mortgage, LLC, an independent mortgage lender with 44 locations across the United States, recently announced the expansion of its footprint in Utah with the opening of its ninth branch in North Salt Lake.Dan Hubrich will as assume the role of Branch Manager for the new North Salt Lake branch and will be responsible for launching and growing this new office.Castle & Cooke Mortgage has opened four new branches in 2016 as it forges ahead with its aggressive expansion strategy to open new branches in 15 to 20 new markets this year.”This move puts me and my team at the heart of Davis County,” Hubrich said. “From sharing a building with our respected real estate partners, to our location at the hub of the business center where our clients can walk right in the door—we are looking forward to being even more available to our borrowers. In all sectors, we have always earned a high level of trust, and we believe in making lifetime clients. This is an opportunity to enhance those relationships further by providing the excellence people have come to expect with the convenience of being just around the corner.”Dan Hubrich will transition his highly seasoned team from Castle & Cooke Mortgage’s Salt Lake City branch to open the North Salt Lake branch at 1010 North 500 East #320, North Salt Lake. Leveraging the comprehensive resources and support available at Castle & Cooke Mortgage, Hubrich is planning to double the size of his team and loan volume within the next year.”I am excited to see our company’s continued expansion in Utah,” said Adam Thorpe, President and COO for Castle & Cooke Mortgage. “With Castle & Cooke Mortgage headquartered in Salt Lake City and offering a comprehensive platform of loan products to meet the specific needs of Utah borrowers, I am very happy that we are in a position to further enrich and refine the suite of services we provide to Utah residents. Dan Hubrich is one of our most accomplished loan originators and a consummate professional. He is familiar with the area and grounded in the community. Dan embodies our guiding principles of honesty, integrity, transparency and hard work and he also continually provides the highest level of service to our clients. These qualities make Dan the perfect candidate to lead our new team in North Salt Lake.” The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Xhevrije West Share Save Sign up for DS News Daily Xhevrije West is a talented writer and editor based in Dallas, Texas. She has worked for a number of publications including The Syracuse New Times, Dallas Flow Magazine, and Bellwethr Magazine. She completed her Bachelors at Alcorn State University and went on to complete her Masters at Syracuse University.  Print This Post Castle & Cooke Mortgage Expands in Utah in Featured, News Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Featured / Castle & Cooke Mortgage Expands in Utah February 29, 2016 1,168 Views The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Castle & Cooke Mortgage 2016-02-29 Brian Honea Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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The Ups and Downs of Goldman Sachs Two Quarters

first_img The Ups and Downs of Goldman Sachs Two Quarters Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Ups and Downs of Goldman Sachs Two Quarters The first and second quarters of 2016 told two different stories for Goldman Sachs as far as earnings and overall business operations: in the first quarter, everything was down; in the second quarter, everything is back up.According to the investment banking firm’s Q2 2016 earnings report released Tuesday, Goldman Sachs reported net earnings of $1.82 billion for Q2—an increase from $1.14 billion in the first quarter and from $1.05 billion in Q2 2015. Diluted earnings per common share in Q2 were $3.72, compared to $1.98 in the year-ago quarter and $2.68 for Q1 2016.Whereas challenges presented headwinds to nearly all of Goldman Sachs’ businesses in Q1, things ran somewhat more smoothly in Q2. There were still challenges in Q2 however; low interest rates, political uncertainty about global growth continued to pose challenges to Goldman Sachs’ Fixed Income, Currency, and Commodities Client Execution segments.“Despite the uncertainty created by Brexit, we achieved solid results by continuing to serve our clients across our diversified franchise and by managing our business efficiently,” said Lloyd C. Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs.Also, Goldman Sachs announced in January that it had agreed to a $5 billion settlement in April with the Department of Justice over the sales of toxic mortgage-backed securities prior to the crisis; the settlement was made final in April. The firm reported net earnings of only $765 million in the fourth quarter of 2015 immediately after making the announcement about the settlement.A major difference in the earnings of Goldman Sachs between the second quarter a year ago and Q2 this year was lower net provisions for litigation and regulatory proceedings for Q2 this year ($126 million). Last year during the second quarter, the firm recorded $1.45 billion in net provisions for mortgage-related litigation and other regulatory matters. Non-compensation expenses were $2.14 billion in the second quarter, a decline of 40 percent from Q2 2015 (and an increase of 2 percent from Q1 2016).“The decrease compared with the second quarter of 2015 primarily reflected significantly lower net provisions for mortgage-related litigation and regulatory matters, which are included in other expenses,” the Q2 earnings report stated. “In addition, market development expenses were lower compared with the second quarter of 2015.”Click here to see Goldman Sachs’ complete Q2 earnings report. July 19, 2016 1,715 Views Kendall Baer is a Baylor University graduate with a degree in news editorial journalism and a minor in marketing. She is fluent in both English and Italian, and studied abroad in Florence, Italy. Apart from her work as a journalist, she has also managed professional associations such as Association of Corporate Counsel, Commercial Real Estate Women, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and Project Management Institute for Association Management Consultants in Houston, TX. Born and raised in Texas, Kendall now works as the online editor for DS News. About Author: Kendall Baer Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Distressed Sales May Reach “Normal” By 2017 Next: Clayton Holdings Creates New Option for ‘Fix and Flip’ Lending Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Tagged with: Earnings Goldman Sachs Mortgage-Backed Securities Profitscenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Earnings Goldman Sachs Mortgage-Backed Securities Profits 2016-07-19 Kendall Baer Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agolast_img read more

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Leading Real Estate Finance and Credit Industry Law Firm Expands with New Associate Attorney

first_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post Potestivo & Associates, P.C., recently announced the hiring of its 27th attorney, local lawyer Anthony J. DeClercq. Joining the firm’s other 26 attorneys and more than 100 team members—who serve in offices across three states—DeClercq began his new role as an Associate Attorney supporting the Litigation Department on January 30. He is based in Potestivo’s downtown Rochester, Michigan, headquarters.DeClercq earned his Juris Doctor from Michigan State University College of Law after graduating with a Bachelor of Science in History from Central Michigan University. He completed several significant clerkships and internships, such as serving as a Law Clerk for the Honorable Kathryn A. Viviano at the Macomb County 16th Judicial Circuit Court. DeClercq also brings a wealth of real estate and finance experience gained from past positions, such as working as a mortgage underwriter for a wholesale mortgage company.This background and proven work ethic made DeClercq a great fit for Potestivo & Associates, which provides legal solutions to the real estate finance and credit industry. “We are very pleased to welcome Anthony,” said Brian Potestivo, President-Managing Attorney. “He brings the industry knowledge, experience, and initiative to serve our clients.”A member of the Michigan State Bar and a certified Notary Public, DeClercq also applies his talents to support philanthropic efforts. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Haley Owens Share Save in Featured, Media, News Previous: ValuAmerica Offers Closing Cost Quotes with ClosingCorp’s SmartCalc Next: LRES Instates New VP of Technology Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days ago February 22, 2017 1,067 Views Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Anthony J. DeClercq Brian Potestivo Central Michigan DS News Michigan State University College of Law Potestivo & Associates 2017-02-22 Haley Owens Tagged with: Anthony J. DeClercq Brian Potestivo Central Michigan DS News Michigan State University College of Law Potestivo & Associates Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Featured / Leading Real Estate Finance and Credit Industry Law Firm Expands with New Associate Attorney Leading Real Estate Finance and Credit Industry Law Firm Expands with New Associate Attorney Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

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Credit Card Debt Is Rising, and Housing Costs Aren’t Helping

first_img credit card debt House Prices Mortgages NerdWallet 2017-12-11 David Wharton Credit Card Debt Is Rising, and Housing Costs Aren’t Helping Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago December 11, 2017 2,070 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago American credit card debt continued to creep higher in 2017, with the average American household now owing a balance of $15,654, according to a new analysis by NerdWallet. For a bit of context, NerdWallet’s study also found that the average American household holding any debt at all owed a total of $131,431—including mortgages. Furthermore, Americans with a mortgage owe an average of $173,995 toward that mortgage, according to NerdWallet’s study.Overall, U.S. consumers owe $8.74 trillion on their mortgages, and $905 billion towards credit card debt.NerdWallet’s study finds that the median annual household income has grown 20 percent over the past decade, which is ahead of the cost of living increase during the same period (18 percent). That’s good news, on the face of it. However, specific cost increases have outpaced income growth during that decade, including housing (20 percent increase), medical expenses (34 percent), food and beverages (22 percent), and “other” expense (30 percent). According to a recent FHFA report, home prices rose 6.5 percent between Q3 2016 and Q3 2017. When these costs mount, average Americans often turn to credit cards to try and make ends meet.  Unsurprisingly, Americans with credit card debt said they view trying to keep up with those monthly payments as an impediment to other financial goals. In a NerdWallet survey, 57 percent of those surveyed said they would save money for future emergencies if not for their credit card debt. Fifty percent said they would save it for some future goal—such as buying a home—while 33 percent said they would use the money toward paying off other debts.Interestingly, however, NerdWallet’s study found that homeowners are, on average, paying quite a bit more on credit card interest annually than renters are. The average homeowner is paying around $1,001 in credit card interest per year, which is nearly twice the renter average of $537.Another interesting finding: self-employment also ratchets up the average total credit card debt for a household. According to NerdWallet, “U.S. households led by self-employed individuals pay $1,194 in credit card interest each year, compared with $843 for those who work for someone else.” A Fannie Mae survey revealed that one-fifth of American adults have provided a service through the gig economy, and many of those surveyed say they do want to buy a home at some point. Along with other factors such as medical debt, the increased average credit card debt for those who are self-employed or gig workers could prove one major obstacle toward owning a home for this segment of the population.One good piece of news: 41 percent of those surveyed reported unnecessary purchases as a contributing factor toward credit card debt. If these purchases are recognized by the consumer as unnecessary, eliminating or decreasing those expenditures would be a good first approach to decreasing that household’s credit card debt. However, 33 percent of those surveyed reported using credit cards to help supplement regular income in order to afford necessities—and “necessities” often involves things from those categories that are rising faster than income growth, such as housing and medical expenditures. It remains a tricky balance for struggling families to pay their bills and still be able to save for the future—or for a home.You can read NerdWallet’s full 2017 American Household Credit Card Debt Study by clicking here. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Tagged with: credit card debt House Prices Mortgages NerdWallet The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: David Wharton Previous: What’s on the Horizon for Housing Affordability? Next: Tax Changes Could Drive Migration, Slow Home Sales  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Credit Card Debt Is Rising, and Housing Costs Aren’t Helping in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agolast_img read more

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The Industry Pulse: Updates on Freddie Mac, Ocwen, and More

first_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago ACES Risk Management Company News Dyck-O’Neal Freddie Mac Ocwen The Industry Pulse USMI 2018-06-27 David Wharton Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago From new appointments and research to new technology and rule changes, get the latest buzz on the industry in this weekly update.Freddie Mac announced a new partnership with re-employment solutions company NextJob to provide job search assistance to current and aspiring homeowners living in high-needs and other persistent poverty areas. The initiative, undertaken as part of Freddie Mac’s three-year Duty to Serve plan, serves as an expansion of the partnership between the two companies that will help financially distressed homeowners in these underserved markets.“While some parts of the country are benefitting from low unemployment rates, many rural areas continue to see limited opportunities and flattening or declining wage growth,” said Mike Dawson, VP of Single-Family Affordable Lending Strategies and Initiatives at Freddie Mac. “Through our work with NextJob, and by partnering with leading local organizations on the front lines of this problem, we are capitalizing on the success of our past employment programs to help the next frontier of unmet workforce development needs. This partnership will provide meaningful opportunities to create and sustain homeownership for families across rural America.”________________________________________________________________________________Ocwen Financial Corporation, a leading financial services holding company headquartered in West Palm Beach, Florida, will again join forces with the NAACP to host a borrower outreach event in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to help families having trouble making their mortgage payments.“Over the last three years, Ocwen and the NAACP have worked together on our “Help & Hope for Homeowners” initiative, which helps homeowners explore responsible loan modifications options to remain in their homes,” Jill Showell, SVP of Government and Community Relations at Ocwen said. “We urge Ocwen customers to attend this event, and have the opportunity to work one-on-one with trusted advisors to make your mortgage payments more affordable.”The event, which is part of Ocwen’s “Help & Hope for Homeowners” initiative with the NAACP, is designed exclusively for Ocwen customers and will be held from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., EDT, on Saturday, June 23, at Bright Hope Baptist Church, located at 12th Street & Cecil B. Moore Avenue in Philadelphia near Temple University.________________________________________________________________________________Washington-based association U.S Mortgage Insurers(USMI) has announced that Bradley Shuster, Chairman, and CEO of National Mortgage Insurance Corporation (National MI) will serve as the association’s Chairman. He succeeds Patrick Sinks, CEO of Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation (MGIC) and will be supported in his efforts by Vice Chair, Richard Thornberry, CEO of Radian Group Inc.According to USMI, Shuster’s appointment comes at a “significant time in the housing finance system, which remains at the center of national policy debates.””The housing finance system continues to strengthen and make enhancements to safety and soundness that make it more resilient, and the private mortgage insurance industry has played a significant role in these improvements,” Shuster said after his appointment. “As policymakers consider how to put the housing finance system on a sustainable, long-term path for the future, I am excited to serve as USMI’s Chairman to continue to champion the important role private mortgage insurance plays–and will continue to play–in facilitating responsible low down payment lending while protecting the government and taxpayers against mortgage credit risk.”________________________________________________________________________________Florida-headquartered Aces Risk Management (ARMCO) has promoted Sharon Reichhardt, the company’s director of client services to the position of VP, Client Success. In her new role, Reichhardt will manage ongoing adoption by customers of the full feature-set of the ACES Audit Technology platform, ARMCO’s flagship product. She will also oversee ARMCO’s professional services division, which focuses on expanding usage and understanding of the company’s technology and data products by working closely with clients to configure the ACES platform for maximum efficiency and return on investment.“As a former client, Sharon knows firsthand the operational challenges that the industry faces and how ACES can be leveraged to save costs, introduce efficiency and transparency and reduce risk to financial institutions,” said Avi Naider, CEO, ARMCO. “With her vast experience implementing ACES across multiple divisions at a large bank and across multiple clients as a director, Sharon is the perfect fit for this important position at the company.”Reichhardt brings over 25 years of mortgage industry experience to her post. Prior to joining ARMCO, she spent 20 years at EverBank, where she held various management level positions, primarily in quality control. During her tenure at EverBank, Reichhardt was the primary administrator of the ACES platform across several divisions at the bank.________________________________________________________________________________Dyck-O’Neal, Inc., a Texas-based subsidiary of The Prescott Group, recently celebrated its 30th anniversary, following a year of growth and expansion. Originally founded in 1988 as a debt recovery firm specializing in the nationwide resolution of commercial and consumer judgments, deficiencies, and charge-offs, the company has evolved over the years and now purchases and services a variety of performing, sub-performing, and non-performing loans.In 1993, Dyck-O’Neal partnered with the FDIC in their JDC program, working to resolve and recover on portfolios of loans from failed financial institutions. Dyck-O’Neal’s partnership with the FDIC continues today, and the company also offers a full scope of loan resolution services, including turnkey portfolio review, servicing, and recovery for acquired portfolios and whole-loan purchases, providing services for the GSEs, FDIC, mortgage insurers, banks, private equity firms, mortgage REITs, and investors nationwide.“Dyck-O’Neal’s growth has been driven by our strategic approach to putting borrowers first when settling or servicing real estate debt,” said Jori O’Neal, Founder. She added, “Our professional staff helps families improve their credit and live a better life.” David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post About Author: David Wharton Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Industry Pulse: Updates on Freddie Mac, Ocwen, and More The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Related Articles June 27, 2018 2,029 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Home / Daily Dose / The Industry Pulse: Updates on Freddie Mac, Ocwen, and More Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Foreclosure Trends on the Horizon Next: The Ongoing Struggle of Pending Home Sales Tagged with: ACES Risk Management Company News Dyck-O’Neal Freddie Mac Ocwen The Industry Pulse USMI Subscribelast_img read more

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The Rocky Road to Fee Recovery

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, News, Print Features The Rocky Road to Fee Recovery About Author: Robert Finlay Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: Civil Code DOT Fees Foreclosure November 2, 2018 1,559 Views Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Robert Finlay is one of the three founding partners of Wright, Finlay & Zak. Since 1994, Finlay has focused his legal career on consumer credit, business, and real estate litigation and has extensive experience with trials, mediations, arbitrations, and appeals. Finlay is at the forefront of the mortgage banking industry, handling all aspects of the ever-changing default servicing and mortgage banking litigation arena, including compliance issues for servicers, lenders, investors, title companies, and foreclosure trustees. Editor’s Note: This feature originally appeared in the November issue of DS News, out now.Recovering attorney’s fees can be a contentious aspect of any legal proceeding. When it involves navigating the terrain of foreclosures, the process can become even more complicated. A pair of recent decisions from the California Court of Appeals has provided clarification when it comes to whether and how servicers can recover their attorney’s fees after successfully defending challenges to their deed of trust (DOT)—and unfortunately, the news is potentially troubling.In both Hart v. Clear Recon Corp and Nationstar and Chacker v. JPMorgan Chase Bank, separate panels of the Second Appellate District held that the provisions in the standard form deed of trust relied on by the prevailing lender only allowed the holder to add fees and costs incurred in defending the litigation to the loan balance. The provisions did not, however, allow for a separately recoverable fee award against the borrower. In other words, if the property does not have sufficient equity to cover these amounts, the holder is out of luck. And, even worse, if the defendant assigned away its interest in the DOT before judgment, it is completely out of luck as it would not even have the potential for recovering its fees through the foreclosure sale. As the court, quoting the late Justice Scalia in another context, stated in Chacker, the assignor “must take the bitter with the sweet.”THE BITTER AND THE SWEETThe facts and ruling of both cases are relatively similar. In Chacker, the borrower sued Chase to stop the foreclosure sale. Chase’s demurrer was sustained without leave to amend, and the trial court entered a judgment of dismissal. Chase’s attorneys then moved for attorney’s fees under the standard language of paragraphs 9 and 14 of the DOT, which was granted by the trial court. The Court of Appeal reversed, vacating the judgment for fees and ordering that Chase’s attorney’s fees could only be added to the loan balance, not collected directly from the borrower.The published portion of the appeal did not focus on Chase’s right to recover fees or the amount of the fees. Instead, the decision focused on whether paragraphs 9 and 14 of the DOT limit Chase to adding the fees to the amount owed under the DOT, or whether these provisions supported a separate judgment against the borrower, independent of its repayment obligations under the note and the DOT. Paragraph 9 of the relevant DOT provided that the lender may pay reasonable attorney’s fees to protect its interest in the property or DOT. However, the plain language of the DOT specifies that “any amounts disbursed by Lender under this Section 9 shall become additional debt of the Borrower secured by this [DOT].” The court held that the plain language of paragraph 9 did not provide for a separate award of attorney’s fees. Likewise, paragraph 14 of the DOT states that the lender may “charge” the borrower fees for services performed in connection with borrower’s default, for the purpose of protecting lender’s interest in the property or DOT, including attorney’s fees. However, again, the plain language of this paragraph provides that the attorney’s fees are to be added or “charged” to the loan balance. As a result, paragraph 14 did not permit a freestanding contractual attorney fee award. Paragraphs 9 and 14 of Chase’s DOT reflect the standard language used by most institutional residential lenders.Adding insult to injury, and leading to its quote from Justice Scalia, the court rejected Chase’s point that the adding of the fees to the loan balance did nothing to assist Chase in recovering the fees it had incurred because it no longer had any interest in the loan, as the rights had been assigned to another financial institution and therefore would not be paid out of any subsequent foreclosure. The court observed that Chase could have protected itself against that result by including language in the assignment “to account for how attorney fees may be recovered when a borrower defaults.”In Hart, two plaintiffs (mother and son) sued Nationstar for wrongful foreclosure. Neither plaintiff was the borrower under the DOT, and the sole borrower was not a party to the action. Nationstar obtained summary judgment on the basis that the plaintiffs were not borrowers, and therefore had no rights under the DOT, and had no right to sue to stop the foreclosure. Nationstar’s attorneys sought its attorney’s fees as a prevailing party under the DOT. Unlike in Chacker, Nationstar relied exclusively on the attorney fee language in paragraph 9 of the DOT. Like Chase’s DOT, paragraph 9 of Nationstar’s DOT provided that if there is a legal proceeding that might significantly affect the lender’s interest in the property or security, the lender may do and pay for whatever is reasonable to protect the lender’s interest, including paying attorney’s fees to defend itself in a lawsuit. The provision then provides that “[a]ny amounts disbursed by Lender under this Section 9 shall become additional debt of Borrower secured by this Security Instrument.” The trial court granted Nationstar’s attorney’s fees motion, holding that paragraph 9 of the DOT was an attorney’s fees provision. The Court of Appeals reversed, however, holding that paragraph 9 did not permit an award of attorneys’ fees against the plaintiffs.On appeal, Nationstar argued that it was entitled to a fee award under paragraphs 9, 14, and 22 of the DOT, as well as the note. The Court of Appeals refused to consider on appeal whether paragraphs 14 or 22 of the DOT or the note itself, justified an award because Nationstar had failed to raise these arguments at the trial court level. Instead, the court focused exclusively on what was before it—paragraph 9. Like in Chacker, the court concluded that the plain language of paragraph 9 does not provide for an award of attorney’s fees. Rather, it is “a provision that attorney’s fees, like any other expenses the lender may incur to protect its interest, will be added to the secured debt.” The court did, however, note that the result may have been different had Nationstar moved originally under paragraph 22. Likewise, and as discussed more below, we believe the result could be different if the lender had moved for fees under the language in the note.SPEEDBUMPS ALONG THE WAYWhat do these decisions mean for a lender or servicer who successfully defends a challenge to the foreclosure or DOT brought by the borrower or a related party? While the Hart and Chacker decisions are disheartening on their face, there are options for getting around their holdings. In addition, the decisions raise several interesting issues for a lender or loan servicer to consider, including:Review your DOT: While most institutional lenders use DOTs with similar language to the ones at issue in these two cases, the language in conventional, private party, and some older DOTs vary. At the onset of your case, we suggest looking at your specific DOT to determine whether it has language that varies from the language in the Chase and Nationstar DOTs.Move for fees under paragraph 22 of the note: Although rejected as not timely raised, Nationstar raised an excellent argument on appeal, i.e., that the language in the acceleration paragraph 22 provided for attorney’s fees but did not restrict the recovery of those fees to adding the fees to the amounts owed under the note and DOT. Likewise, many notes contain language providing for attorney’s fees to the prevailing lender. If the note involved in your litigation contains favorable attorney fee language, use that as the basis or your fee motion.Postforeclosure fees: While not directly addressed in either of the court’s rulings, without another ground for a fee judgment, lenders are presumably barred from recovering fees postforeclosure. If the lender’s only recourse is to add the fees to the amount owed under the note and DOT and the foreclosure sale has already occurred, there is no loan to add the fees to!Recovering fees posttransfer: As Chase found out the hard way, while you may be entitled to add fees to the note and DOT, that process is complicated if the loan has been sold or service transferred prior to resolving the litigation. Logistically, how can the prior lender add fees to a note they no longer own or service and, even if they could, how would one collect them? It can be done but it will require lots of calls to the new lender or servicer.Can a servicer recover fees under the DOT? California law is mixed on whether a servicer can recover fees under the DOT. Fortunately, most decisions and courts side with the servicer. While the Hart and Chacker decisions focused on the successor to the lender’s right to recover fees, the rulings will apply similarly to a servicer. Indeed, implicit under Chacker was its acceptance that Chase, even as a nonparty, was entitled, as an agent of the owner, to be paid its fees—it just was limited to doing so by adding them to the loan balance. Likewise, the servicer will have the same challenges collecting fees if the servicing of the loan has already transferred to a new servicer.Can the foreclosure trustee recover its litigation defense fees? Whether a foreclosing trustee named in borrower litigation can recover its litigation defense’s fees and costs is a complicated question. Regardless of the recent decisions discussed above, most standard form DOTs do not contain language specifically allowing the trustee to obtain a fee award or add them directly to the loan. It will generally require nonstandard language specifically providing that the trustee can recover fees. (Note: the court did confirm fees for the trustee in the Chacker case; however, it appears to have done so without much thought and perhaps was an oversight.)Can the borrower still recover fees? Unfortunately, yes. While it might seem inequitable, the reciprocal language of Civil Code Section 1717 still gives the prevailing borrower the ability to recover a fee award, even if the prevailing lender or servicer is limited to adding the fees to the loan.Do you need to move for fees or can you add them directly to your DOT? Even before these decisions, servicers and lenders often asked our firm if they could simply add the attorney’s fees and costs directly to the loan like they do with advances for taxes, inspection fees, bankruptcy fees, nonjudicial foreclosure fees, etc. The answer was almost uniformly—no. Although the DOT language cited above appears to provide that the attorney’s fees in defensive litigation with the borrower can be added directly to the loan, Civil Code Section 1717 provides that only the prevailing party is entitled to fees (and the fees must be reasonable). Therefore, until the lender wins and is awarded “reasonable” fees, the lender cannot simply add them directly to the loan. However, the Hart and Chacker decisions appear to bring into question the traditional approach. Both decisions repeatedly point to the language in the DOT that the fees can be added directly to the loan. In fact, the court in Hart vacated the fee award completely, holding that Nationstar was essentially free to apply the fees directly to the loan. “[Paragraph 9] is, instead, a provision that attorney’s fees, like any other expenses the lender may incur to protect its interest, will be added to the secured debt.”However, there are other issues at play, and we strongly recommend consulting with our office or another attorney before adding any litigation-related fees directly to your DOT.Updating the attorney fee language in your DOT: While it might be difficult for institutional lenders, private and conventional lenders can revise the language in their DOTs to clearly state that the lender is entitled to add the fees to the loan or, at its sole discretion, obtain an attorney fee award. Again, please consult your attorney before revising the provisions in your DOT.Why do I even care if the borrower is already in default? In most instances where the borrower sues its lender, the loan is in default. If the borrower cannot afford to make his or her mortgage payments, he or she often cannot reimburse a lender for its litigation fees and costs. For the last decade or so, it did not make much sense for a lender to incur the expense of moving for fees. Now, however, with property values in California at or above all-time peaks, many litigious borrowers have equity in their homes. If they chose to sue and are unsuccessful, the prevailing lender may want to consider trying to recover its defense costs from the equity in the property. In addition, with borrowers who are serial litigants, the threat of having to pay fees when they lose might help dissuade them.As you can see, while the court’s recent decisions seem clear cut, they raise a plethora of issues for a lender, servicer, and trustee to consider when moving for fees. We recommend analyzing your DOT at the outset of any litigation to determine whether you can ultimately recover your attorney’s fees should you ultimately prevail. Even if you never end up filing the fee motion, knowing your options is useful when negotiating with the other side or during a mediation. Civil Code DOT Fees Foreclosure 2018-11-02 Radhika Ojha The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Rocky Road to Fee Recovery Previous: Potestivo & Associates Grows Team with Two New Attorneys Next: QRL to Leverage DocMagic Technology Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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How to Improve the NFIP

first_img Share Save Related Articles Previous: Hurricane Heading North After Decimating Bahamas Next: Federal Reserve Reports Economic Conditions The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Disaster flooding Insurance nfip 2019-09-04 Seth Welborn Congress has until September 30 to reauthorize the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), and according to Craig Poulton, CEO of Poulton Associates, LLC, the NFIP has caused plenty of harm as it funds subsidies to unintentionally encourage building homes in dangerous locations. In an article on The Hill, Poulton argues that a reauthorization of the NFIP should include a solution. National Flood Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2019, H.R. 3167, according to Poulton, “represents an admirable bipartisan effort and would be a prudent reauthorization of the NFIP.”According to Poulton, the NFIP is a failed system that doesn’t address the risk faced by millions of Americans.“The insurance is too inexpensive, and the NFIP and federal government don’t mandate that municipal governments take the right steps” Poulton told Insurance Business. “The problem with that is folks in any given locality believe they will never be flooded, hence they don’t buy flood insurance unless they’re forced to because they have a mortgage.”Lawmakers are taking some steps to update the NFIP. For example, Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi is proposing an update to the Program, which aims to address the multiple extensions the NFIP has undergone with a long-term extension plan.In her letter to Senate Banking Committee Chairman Michael Crapo and Ranking Member Sherrod Brown, Hyde-Smith puts forth several options to address affordability issues among low and middle-income policy holders and debt issues within the NFIP. “We’re trying to flip the script on mitigation projects, from being reactionary to being proactive.  This is the first bill that provides a significant amount of real money for pre-disaster mitigation, which would give taxpayers a better return on investment.  It is far more expensive to rebuild after a disaster than it is to do everything you can to protect yourself beforehand,” Hyde-Smith said in a statement. How to Improve the NFIP in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Investment, News About Author: Seth Welborn Home / Daily Dose / How to Improve the NFIP Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily center_img September 4, 2019 1,278 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Tagged with: Disaster flooding Insurance nfip Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Subscribelast_img read more

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How Pre-Election ‘Stress and Uncertainty’ Might Influence the Housing Market

first_img  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago October 7, 2020 1,162 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Traditionally, Presidential elections have not made much of a difference in the housing market. This one could be more impactful, according to a survey from Redfin.That said, most insiders do not believe that, in the long term, it will significantly impact the market, although COVID-19-related issues could.”We expect home sales to continue to grow this fall due to the coronavirus pandemic; we are forecasting more home sales in 2020 than in any year since 2006,” Redfin reported.Some findings of note from said survey:22% of homebuyers and sellers (looking to buy/sell in the next 12 months) out of 1,400 surveyed said the presidential election is impacting their plans to buy or sell a home.  That’s down from 32% in November 2019, according to a previous Redfin report. “The drop from last year is likely due to the pandemic, which seems to be outweighing the election as a factor for homebuyers and sellers,” the researchers said.13% of respondents said the election is making them more hesitant to buy or sell a home, down from 20% in November 2019.9% of respondents said the election is making them less hesitant to buy or sell a home, down from 12% in November. “That’s unlikely to have a major impact on the housing market, partly because a portion of those people will probably buy and/or sell once the election has passed,” Redfin reported.65% of potential homebuyers and sellers said the upcoming presidential election isn’t impacting their plans, compared to 60% in November 2019.75% of buyers and 50% of sellers say COVID-19 is impacting their plans this year.43% of buyers said they’re planning to buy a home later than originally planned because of the pandemic, and 34% said they’re buying a home sooner than originally planned.21% of sellers said the pandemic is delaying their selling plans, 19% said it’s accelerating their selling plans, and 10% said they’ve decided not to sell their home.On the ground, agents aren’t necessarily expecting a huge market shift due to the current battle for the White House.“Almost all the buyers I work with ask how the election could impact their home purchase,” Pruitt said. “I don’t have a crystal ball, but presidential elections have never seemed to affect the housing market much in the six election cycles I’ve been a real estate agent. The pandemic is having a much bigger impact, with low mortgage rates motivating buyers who want more space to work from home.”Although agents including Danielle Field from Louisville, Kentucky said some experiencing pre-election anxiety want to hold off.“Some home sellers—and buyers, to a lesser extent—are delaying their plans because of all the stress and uncertainty in the world, including the divisiveness surrounding the presidential election,” said Field. “They don’t want to add one more stressful experience to their lives. I’m hopeful that once the election is over and there’s finally some certainty in this country, people will start putting their homes on the market again, creating more inventory for buyers.”Past presidential elections have had “minimal correlation with U.S. home sales rising or falling, which squares with Redfin’s survey findings,” Redfin reported. “Home sales rose by an average of just 0.4% in October and November of presidential election years compared with non-election years, according to a Redfin analysis of home sales going back to 1980, which includes 10 presidential elections and controls for other economic factors such as changes in mortgage rates. In the December of presidential election years—the month representing closed sales for offers made during November, the election month—home sales dropped by an average of 1.5%, followed by a 1.5% recovery in January.”Redfin noted that its survey is the result of the following methodology:The analysis of elections’ impact on home sales is based on a TSLM forecast for monthly seasonally adjusted home sales from 1980 to 2020 across each metro where county records are available and nationally. The model predicts monthly home sales in each region, incorporating factors of previous trend, mortgage rates, consumer confidence, job growth, and a recession indicator. Then we estimate the expected effect on home sales during each October, November, December and January of presidential-election years. The average growth or decline in home sales noted above is the change that’s attributed to the election. For instance, if Redfin expects 500,000 home sales in the typical October, we expect 502,000 (0.4% more) in the October of a presidential election. About Author: Christina Hughes Babb Sign up for DS News Daily 2020-10-07 Christina Hughes Babb Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: HUD Awards $4 Million for Disabled Veterans’ Residences Next: ‘Good Time to Sell’ Sentiment Climbing The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / How Pre-Election ‘Stress and Uncertainty’ Might Influence the Housing Market Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago How Pre-Election ‘Stress and Uncertainty’ Might Influence the Housing Marketlast_img read more

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