Sainsbury’s unveils top 10 list of plant bread loaves

first_imgSainsbury’s has revealed that its top-selling loaf is Kingsmill Square White Medium 800g, followed by Hovis Square Cut White 800g.A top 10 list supplied by the supermarket also shows a wholemeal loaf in the line-up, as well as two breads “with bits” – Hovis Best of Both and Kingsmill Wholegrain & White.Sainsbury’s top 10 plant bread best-sellers1 Kingsmill Square White Medium 800g2 Hovis Square Cut White 800g3 Kingsmill Square White Thick 800g4 Hovis Best of Both 800g5 JS Basics White Medium 800g6 JS Standard White Thick 800g7 Warburtons Toastie White Sliced 800g8 Kingsmill Wholegrain & White Medium 800g9 Warburtons Wholemeal Medium 400g10 Warburtons Medium White Sliced 800glast_img

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Buy British

first_imgFood from Britain (FFB) will be promoting British regional food and drink to both UK and international buyers through its presence at IFE07 (stand NH 1755). FFB will host a business lounge for overseas buyers looking to source food from Britain, and has worked with the English Regional Food Groups to ensure maximum presence of quality food and drink producers at the show. Some 150 producers will be featured in the speciality and regional food from Britain sector.Working with UK Trade & Investment, FFB has invited some 20 buyers to IFE from Canada, China, Japan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and the United Arab Emirates.A meet the buyer event will also be staged, matching UK suppliers with appropriate overseas buyers. FFB chief executive David McNair says: “Our international buyers’ lounge at this year’s show will provide the catalyst for business generation and is part of our role to ensure British exhibitors maximise business opportunities.”This year, FFB is forecasting the highest ever level of food and drink exports and we aim to meet the increasing demands of international buyers looking to the UK for its innovation, added value and convenience retailing expertise.”last_img read more

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Consumer watch

first_imgI used to go to Greggs every other day when I lived in Headingley, Leeds. There was a shop on my street so it was very convenient to buy bread, sandwiches or pasties. Occasionally I’d buy doughnuts there too. I also used to go to Ainsleys of Leeds a lot because there are so many shops dotted around the city centre.I went to Leeds University and I really liked Ainsleys bakeries because they did a lot of student promotions. It means a lot when you’re living off hardly any money!They also seemed to employ a lot of young people, which I think also entices students into to their shops.Now, however, I live in London and I only go to Greggs about once every two weeks. There seem to be a lot fewer Greggs stores than in Leeds. I hardly ever see them in the centre of London.I like Greggs’ tuna sandwiches with mayo, onions and there’s a nice one with peppers. I also really like the cheese and onion and chicken pasties. They’re quite filling, so I’ll usually pick one up when I’m out shopping or sometimes when I’m on my way back from work and can’t be bothered cooking.Now I live in London, I just tend to go to the supermarkets to buy everything all at once and I am becoming more aware of the latest health trends.I really enjoy brown bread made with lots of nuts and seeds. It tastes good and is better for me than white.Note to all bakers: I love crunchy flapjacks but now I barely ever see them!Natalie Bamber, 23, is a conference producerlast_img read more

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Bakbel fills portfolio gap

first_imgBakbel Europe’s new ¤6m fruit fillings and jam factory near Brussels was officially opened by the minister for economy of the Walloon region in Belgium last Friday.The site, a joint venture between the Bakels Group and Didier Ladriere, an expert in fruit-based products, can potentially produce up to 100 tonnes of filling a day.”Until now, one of the gaps in our portfolio has been fruit-based products such as fruit fillings and glazes,” chairman of the Bakels Group, Armin Ulrich, told British Baker. “Quality is our main focus; for example, blueberries are the wild Canadian variety.”?Bakbel will receive up to 18% in subsidies from the Belgium government, depending on how many, and the quality, of jobs that it creates. Currently, 80 people work at the factory.last_img read more

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Last year’s winner:Simon Oddie, operations manager, Waterfields

first_img“Winning the Craft Bakery Award last year confirmed what we’re about. The craft of baking is our focus – we have a wide range of products and devote a lot of time to staff, skills and training. We used the awards – John Waterfield was also named Baker of the Year – as a marketing tool. We put the awards logo on our letterheads, promoted the win on the website and put up posters and information in the shops. Since winning, we’ve done a lot more wholesale business in the north west. The award adds credibility to your company and can have a real impact on sales. It’s like a seal of approval.”last_img

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What the judges said

first_imgAbout skills achievement and Paul Barker:Rich’s judges were impressed with “the way Paul had effectively contributed to the growth of all his employees” and noted how “Paul’s passion for applying his acquired bakery skills had helped establish a new brand.”last_img

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The low-down on the upcoming 2008 ABIM Forum

first_imgThe Association of Bakery Ingredient Manufacturers (ABIM) 2008 Forum, Growing A Sustainable Bakery Industry, is to take place on 6 June at the Devonshire Arms Country House Hotel, Bolton Abbey, Skipton. The event will start with a buffet lunch and networking opportunity, followed by a programme of talks in the afternoon. Ed Garner from TNS Worldwide Panel will be discussing ‘Who is the “health conscious UK consumer?”, looking at the health conscious buying habits of UK consumers, and what the future might hold for the baking industry.Matthew May from the Alliance for Bakery Students and Trainees will be discussing what the perspective of bakery students and trainees is, and what the industry’s needs are for the future in terms of education and training.Improve Ltd will be looking at the current skills, challenges and opportunities available in the industry, and what can be done to address skills gaps. Other guest speakers include Alette Addison from the Food Standards Agency, and Dr Wayne Martindale from the Food Innovation Centre, Sheffield Hallam University.For more information or to register please contact Anne Boyd, ABIM on 0207 420 7102 or email [email protected]last_img read more

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Braby brings in silo service

first_imgBraby has launched a new silo cleaning, maintenance and inspection service.The UK manufacturer of stainless steel and aluminium silos will offer a full servicing menu in order to ensure that bakeries stay ATEX-compliant and also to extend the life of their silos. ATEX is a European directive enforced by the Health and Safety Executive, the importance of which Braby aims to promote. The regulations serve to protect workers and businesses from fires and explosions, which may arise from the use of dangerous substances and fine powders, such as flour or sugar.The new service includes scheduled and non-scheduled maintenance packages and is available to both Braby and non-Braby customers. Full reports on the condition of the silos and an indication of maintenance schedules are provided. The company also provides an out-of-office 24-hour emergency service for infestation or incorrect usage of a silo.[http://www.braby.co.uk]last_img read more

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In my world

first_imgSorting through my grandmother’s bakery file with my pop, we came across a folder containing old documents and newspaper clippings. One item from the year dot was my great grandmother’s birth certificate, dated 1887, and the rank/profession of father is recorded as baker. That confirmed my heritage as being at least a fifth-generation baker and gives my son, Milo, the opportunity of being the sixth (no pressure – but we’re already seven years into an 18-year training programme).I then learnt from ’Memories of Down Ampney’ how my great grandfather, Thomas Herbert, a blacksmith by profession, swapped his leather apron for a linen one, when business dried up during the Great Depression. His wife, with her bakery upbringing, encouraged him to convert the forge to an oven and a very primitive bakery was built. The first delivery of one 140lb bag of flour from Henry Cole and Co was boycotted by 22 other local bakeries, who said they would withdraw their trade if Mr Herbert was supplied with flour.Fortunately, the miller stood his ground, stating that everyone had a right to live and that he wouldn’t deny the novice baker his right. Consequently, Henry Cole and Co delivered the first bag at the expense of 16 customers. It is recorded that the bread was awful and, while down on their knees praying for divine intervention to put bread on the table to feed their six children, a Mr Richards, a local ancillaries man, arrived. He empathised with their plight and took his annual leave to assist them in getting established. I have subsequently had the privilege of working alongside his son Ro, who, in his 90s, has generously passed his Lardy cake recipe and method on to me.Later, Herbert’s bakery made bread for the RAF’s Operation Manna at the end of the Second World War, when loaves were dropped on the famished Dutch to ease their hunger.One of their six children, Joe Herbert, was a passionate baker and an article from 1981, celebrating his 50 years in business, describes how he regularly gave demonstrations of his craft to schools. His youngest brother David Herbert, my grandfather, shared the bread gene and his entrepreneurial vision led him to buy a farm and mill, growing English wheat to supply his own bakery.Another clipping tells of his establishing a world record, with the fastest loaf from field to table. This 90-minute odyssey involved a helicopter ride from the harvested crop to Bristol City football ground, then on to the bakery. As a young boy, my brother George and I were mega-impressed with that helicopter ride, and it seems the enthusiasm and passion of my forefathers has imbued in me a sense of ’baker’. The desire, the challenges and the loaves are the same. We bake because we can; times change, but the story lives on…last_img read more

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In Short

first_img== Ulrick & Short gains SA accreditation ==Ulrick & Short has been awarded Soil Association accreditation to help its customers go organic. The clean-label ingredients company can now launch its new organic range under its own brand name. The company says the accreditation will benefit not only the company, but also food processors wanting to clean up their labels and go organic.== FoB event imminent ==The Federation of Bakers’ annual conference takes place on Wednesday 20 May 2009 at the Dorchester Hotel, London. Morning speakers include Dr Susan Jebb, head of human nutrition research from the Medical Research Council and Scott Clarke, bakery category director at Tesco. For details visit bakersfederation.org.uk or contact Julie Pierce on 020 7420 7190.== Kern branches out ==Mail and packaging specialist Kern is launching a separate brand for its packaging division – KernPack. This supplies packaging solutions for customers ranging from small local firms packaging bakery products to larger companies.== Welsh development ==Welsh baker Alun Williams has opened an artisan bakery in Penmaenmawr, North Wales, called Becws Alun. Williams, who has worked 30 years in the trade, produces breads to artisan methods – including spelt and honey, chilli, ginger & coriander and soda bread – and a range of cakes.== Dairygold expansion ==Cheese and dairy supplier Dairygold Food Ingredients UK is to invest heavily in its infrastructure in 2009/10, following the firm’s Grade A accreditation by inspection and certification service EFSIS across all its UK sites.last_img read more

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