Meet the Women of the Dell EMC Partner Program: Kim Lasseter

first_imgThis is the sixth post in our Meet the Women of the Dell EMC Partner Program series, which provides insight into what drives the inspiring women of the Dell EMC channel. Missed the first posts? Get to know Joyce Mullen (President, Global Channel, OEM & IoT, Dell EMC), Cheryl Cook (Senior Vice President of Global Channel Marketing, Dell EMC), Julie Christiansen (Vice President, Global Channel Marketing, Dell EMC), and Sheri Hedlund (Vice President, US Channel Sales, Dell EMC) now.Meet Kim Lasseter – Senior Director Dell EMC Global Partner Marketing Enablement & ToolsWhat is your current role/area of responsibility, and how long have you worked with the channel partner community?I lead the Dell EMC Global Partner Marketing Enablement & Tools team and I am responsible for enabling our partners to grow profitably through marketing investment and education via the partner portal and other channel marketing enablement and adoption initiatives.I just joined Dell EMC a few months ago and it’s been phenomenal.  Prior to Dell, I was Senior Director at Oracle where I led the global partner program team responsible for program & portal strategy with execution focused on growth in recruitment and activation.  Prior to Oracle, I was Director, Global Sales & Services Marketing at Sun Microsystems, Inc. where she held various strategic roles in direct and indirect sales management and marketing over 15-years.What are your goals for your company’s channel business over the next year?I will continue to drive innovation to evolve our partner program marketing enablement and tools and better serve our partners and our customers. With focus areas on net new business, storage and services.  Partners will continue to see updated marketing, sales, enablement and development benefits that will specifically relate to their expertise in the market. Our strategy is customer centric and continues to focus on doing more business across the full Dell Technologies’ family of brands. I believe NOW is the time for partners to capitalize on the digital revolution by focusing on their customers business requirements—and hope our programs will provide them a clear path on their journey.Outside of your family, please name a woman you admire and why?Tiffani Bova is a Wall Street bestselling author, has appeared on MSNBC, Yahoo Finance and is a regular contributor to Forbes, HBR, Marketing Matters on Wharton Business Radio and Huffington Post in addition to a variety of industry-leading podcasts. She is also considered one of the early pioneers of cloud based indirect channel programs. All these accomplishments while impressive, are not what I admire most about her.  I admire Tiffani for her ability and willingness to inspire and motivate others to be the best they can be.  She always makes the time to engage and be present in the moment.  I am honored to call Tiffani a colleague and a friend.What advice would you give to other women in the industry? Or men?Ensure your success by giving focus and energy to a relentless pursuit of information and education around your areas of interest. While remembering to lead with your greatest talents to find your highest point of impact.Please share some words to live by that have helped you throughout your career.To inspire action, start by understanding and answering the “why”.What do you do for fun outside of Dell EMC? I have the most fun doing almost anything outdoors with my family and friends!  I do enjoy golf, baseball and fishing the most.Kimberly and her husband Mike enjoying one of their favorite pastimes, baseball!last_img read more

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Cultural Intelligence Can Mean the World to You on World Culture Day

first_imgLife and business can take us to many varied and incredible places around the world, exposing us to unlimited opportunity, unlimited talent, unlimited experiences and inspirations. To be able to tap into the amazing sources of insight and learning, it takes an open and willing mind to understand and embrace new cultures, attitudes and customs. And all of this can happen all around us, at home, in the office, in our personal life, in everything we do.Understanding CQThis is where Cultural Intelligence (CQ) comes in. Cultural Intelligence is similar to Emotional Intelligence (EQ) but picks up where EQ ends. CQ is the skill to recognize, understand and interpret ambiguous and foreign habits or nuances and even imitate them to help build trust and foster a healthy relationship. That said, this isn’t a magic formula to forge instant close relationships. The truth is, any and every relationship has to be nurtured and developed. We can’t force people to like us or engage with us. Instead we have to work to build relationships on solid foundations based, on mutual ideas, values, preferences and aligned goals.Indeed, it’s exactly these types of skills that are now being identified as critical to the make-up of today’s businesses and integral to the core soft skills required in the workplace of the future. This aligns to the notion of building CQ into the education system ahead of entering a workplace that will be blended and formed of a new combination of people from varying backgrounds and cultures with robots, tech and AI.The Benefits Having a high Cultural Intelligence has proven commercial benefits as it positively impacts the bottom line. 82% of respondents in Deloitte’s Impact of Culture on Business Strategy research believe that “culture is a potential competitive advantage”[1], while a McKinsey & Company study found companies in the bottom 25% for both gender and ethnic/cultural diversity were 29% less likely to experience profitability above the industry average.[2]None of this is just a ‘nice to have’, it’s good for people and for business. Building great relationships is a key foundation to business success. And great relationships, are critically dependent on a few core elements. Communication, trust, understanding and respect. If you are missing just one of these, then most relationships, of any kind, are not going to flourish and stand the test of time. Establishing and maintaining healthy relationships takes thought, time and effort and perhaps most critically, an understanding of differences.How to Make a DifferenceSo how can we bring this all to life and make it real? At Dell Technologies, we have always taken an active role in unlocking innovation by celebrating differences. We champion access and opportunity for all and we respect differences in people and cultures among our team members, customers and partners across the world. We’re passionate about contributing to the communities we live and work in and we strongly support partnerships that help us contribute to those communities and cultivate inclusion.To underline this commitment, Michael Dell chairs our Global Diversity Council. This council provides direction, support and strategic oversight, ensuring that Diversity and Inclusion is woven into the fabric of everything we do. Michael’s role in this demonstrates the intention of our business and it is an example of the role leaders can be playing; instilling the practices and attitudes of Diversity and Inclusion while also encouraging and supporting other leaders to follow suit.On World Culture Day, a global event to raise the awareness and understanding of diversity issues and the value of cultural diversity, it’s a time to reflect just how important it is to have an enhanced understanding and awareness of foreign customs and cultures to begin to build and grow successful and healthy business relationships.Seize the Opportunity  Aside from Global travel, it’s a Global mentality that presents us all with the unique and significant opportunity to learn, grow and innovate professionally and personally. Actively and positively seeking out the moments to experience and absorb new cultures and customs first-hand is the key. That means pushing out of the proverbial comfort zone, raising your CQ and ultimately developing yourself as well as new ideas and opportunities through new genuine, meaningful and real relationships.[1] https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/human-capital-trends/2016/impact-of-culture-on-business-strategy.html[2] https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/delivering-through-diversitylast_img read more

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Evolution at the Edge

first_imgAt Dell Technologies World this year, customers and journalists were curious about trends I am seeing in the marketplace and predictions for the future. I shared my views on the impact of 5G , how AI and IoT are continuing to intersect, and the need for businesses to have consistent, flexible infrastructure to quickly adapt. I also emphasized that the foundation of all these transformations is the shift to edge computing—and it’s our OEM & IoT customers across all industries who are leading this evolution.Location, location, locationAt this point, I should clarify what I mean by the edge. I’m talking about data being processed close to where it’s created, versus the traditional centrally-located data center. I like to think of the difference between the data center and the edge as the difference between living out in the suburbs and living in the city—where all the action is. Right now, about 10 percent of enterprise-generated data is created and processed outside a traditional centralized data center or cloud. However, by 2023, Gartner predicts this figure will reach 75 percent. That’s a dramatic shift by any definition.Three whysSo, why is this happening? Three reasons. First, according to the latest research, the number of connected devices is expected to reach 125 billion by 2030, which will put about 15 connected devices into the hands of every consumer. It simply doesn’t make sense to move all that data to a traditional data center—or even to the cloud.The second reason is cost. It’s naturally more cost-effective to process at least some of the data at the edge. And third, it’s all about speed. Many use cases just cannot accept the latency involved in sending data over a network, processing it and returning a response. Autonomous vehicles and video surveillance are great examples, where even a few seconds delay could mean the difference between an expected outcome and a catastrophic event.Edge computing examplesAnd what kind of compute exists at the edge? Well, it helps me to visualize the edge as a spectrum. On the right end–what I call the far edge–is where data is generated. Picture millions of connected devices generating a constant stream of data for performance monitoring or end user access. One example is a fluid management system, where valves need to be automatically opened or closed, based on threshold triggers being monitored. If this is something that interests you (using IoT data to help customers better manage and troubleshoot control valves), I recommend looking into our joint solution with Emerson.Or, consider how the frequency of fridge doors opening in the chilled food section of a supermarket affects the fridge’s temperature levels, and ultimately the food. It would be crazy to send to the cloud such a massive amount of data simply indicating the binary safe/unsafe temperature status—the store manager only needs to know when the temperature is unsafe. So, the edge is the obvious choice to aggregate and analyze this kind of data. In fact, we’ve worked with a major supermarket retailer to implement refrigeration monitoring and predictive maintenance at their edge. Today, their cooling units are serviced at the appropriate time, and they’re saving millions of dollars in rotten food. If you’re interested in using data to help avoid food waste, check out our joint solution with IMS Evolve.Application-driven solutionsOf course, in the vast majority of cases, the application determines the solution. For example, speed in surveillance systems is critical, when you’re trying to find a lost child in a mall or identify and stop someone that is a known security threat from entering a football stadium. The last thing you want at the crucial moment is for a cloud environment to tell you that it’s busy searching.Thanks to the advent of 5G, carriers are addressing the need for higher data traffic performance by placing servers at the base of cell towers instead of at a regional data center. These are all examples where configuration capability, great graphics and high processing performance come into play. And this brings me to another interesting point. When edge computing started, dedicated gateways were the focus. While still important, that definition has expanded to include servers, workstations, ruggedized laptops and embedded PCs.The micro data centerAnother category of edge compute is what Gartner calls the Micro-Data Center. Many of the attributes of a traditional data center come into play here, such as the need for high reliability, ability to scale the compute as needed, and high levels of management. Conditions that don’t typically demand ruggedized products, but where space limitations are likely.In these scenarios, customers typically consider virtualized solutions. Remote oil rigs, warehouse distribution centers and shipping hubs are great examples. Just think about the speed of packages flying down a conveyer belt at a distribution center, being routed to the right loading area while the data is being logged in real time for tracking. Batch files are then sent back to a central data center for global tracking, billing, and record keeping. In effect, you have a network of micro data centers at the edge, aggregating and analyzing data, while feeding the most relevant information into a larger regional center.Looking aheadIn addition to all the practical benefits (such as faster speed, and lower cost), the edge is also driving fresh innovation. After all, the ability to glean immediate insights, experiment, respond in real time and deliver services on-demand are all important criteria in our ever-changing world. In my view, this dynamic will only accelerate with the advent of 5G. By increasing the speed of data analysis, 5G will inevitably increase edge adoption while, on the other hand, businesses using edge computing will experience the full benefit of 5G networks. Over time, I believe that this combination will inspire a slew of new and exciting applications for both the business and consumer markets.Did you know that Dell Technologies offers a differentiated portfolio that is delivering hardware and software solutions from the edge, to the core, to the cloud? Come talk to us – we would love to help you take advantage of the value that Dell Technologies provides! And join the conversation – I’d love to hear your comments and questions.Learn more about Next Generation OEM & IoT Solutions from Dell Technologies.Join our LinkedIn OEM & IoT Solutions Showcase page.Follow us on Twitter @DellTechOEM and follow me @BryanEJones.last_img read more

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At Sundance, pandemic dramas unfold on screen and off

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic has transformed the annual Sundance Film Festival into a largely virtual event, but it has also reshaped many of the films that will unspool there. The wide majority of Sundance’s films were shot before the arrival of COVID-19. But there are numerous films that managed the seemingly impossible feat of making a movie through the crisis. Sundance will supply the fullest look yet of moviemaking under the pandemic. Even in an independent film world predicated on a can-do spirit, the results are often striking for their resourcefulness. The largely virtual Sundance Film Festival opened Thursday.last_img

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Official: Inmate transfer caused health disaster at prison

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A report by California’s inspector general says misguided attempts to protect inmates from the coronavirus at one prison “caused a public health disaster” at another. Outdated tests failed to detect that some of the transferred inmates were already infected, and two of them later died. Corrections officials reiterated Monday that they had the best intentions. The report says the transfer of those inmates from the California Institution for Men east of Los Angeles to San Quentin State Prison north of San Francisco at the end of May led to the deaths of 28 inmates and a correctional officer there, while infecting 75% of inmates.last_img

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