‘Tremendous resilience’ observed among war-affected children

first_imgChildren traumatized by war can still go on to lead normal lives, according to Theresa Betancourt, associate professor of child health and human rights and director of the research program on children and global adversity at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.In an interview with DW.com published Aug. 21, 2016, Betancourt said that adult family members play an important role in helping children endure the trauma of living in a war zone. “The children see and experience war through the experiences of their parents,” she said, and they suffer when they see their parents suffering. But the soothing comfort provided by a parent can help them manage frightening events.Positive relationships with caregivers and community members, as well as access to school, can help protect children from developing post-traumatic stress disorder, according to Betancourt.While some children act out after experiencing trauma, Betancourt said that the majority do not. “In fact, there is often tremendous resilience observed among war-affected children, with many able to overcome trauma and lead a normal life,” she said. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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At Sundance, pandemic dramas unfold on screen and off

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic has transformed the annual Sundance Film Festival into a largely virtual event, but it has also reshaped many of the films that will unspool there. The wide majority of Sundance’s films were shot before the arrival of COVID-19. But there are numerous films that managed the seemingly impossible feat of making a movie through the crisis. Sundance will supply the fullest look yet of moviemaking under the pandemic. Even in an independent film world predicated on a can-do spirit, the results are often striking for their resourcefulness. The largely virtual Sundance Film Festival opened Thursday.last_img

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Man To Stand Trial For Attempted Murder, Assault In 2019 Shooting

first_imgImage via the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office.MAYVILLE – A man accused in a January 2019 drive-by shooting at the corner of North Main and Ninth Streets in Jamestown will stand trial next month.Jury selection in the trial against Rasul N. Bonds, a City of Jamestown resident, is scheduled to take place next Tuesday, a Chautauqua County Court Clerk told WNYNewsNow Monday.Bonds is charged with first-degree assault and three counts of second-degree attempted murder.Jamestown Police say one man was shot in the face and was seriously injured as he was walking with two other people. Bonds is in Chautauqua County Jail on $150,000 bond.A second Jamestown man, Corey M. Johnson, plead guilty to a reduced charge of first-degree attempted assault on Oct. 23 in connection with the shooting.Johnson was sentenced on Jan. 6 to a determinate term of five years in state prison, plus five years of post-release supervision. Three 12-year orders of protection were also executed.WNYNewsNow will continue to follow the case for updates. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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AGL Inductees

first_imgTwenty-five professionals, who represent a wide swath of Georgia’s agriculture and natural resource industries, have been chosen to participate in the 2019-2020 class of Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry (AGL).Organized by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, the purpose of AGL is to educate and empower Georgia’s agricultural leaders to become effective advocates for the largest economic drivers in Georgia — the state’s agriculture and forestry industries.“This class was chosen from 78 outstanding nominations,” said Lauren Griffeth, director of AGL. “These individuals represent a broad array of facets in agriculture, forestry and allied sectors and display a commitment to leadership in the field for their career.” The AGL program is designed to bring together leaders from all segments of the state’s agriculture, forestry, natural resources and allied industries. Over 16 months, participants will help one another grow through personalized leadership development training geared toward understanding themselves as leaders, analyzing issues facing their industries, and strengthening connections to become catalysts for positive change.AGL’s 2019-2020 inductees are:Daniel Atkins, area marketing manager, WeyerhaeuserToby Bowen, account manager, AGCOJason Bragg, vice president for government relations, Georgia EMCSam Brown, owner and CEO, Fiddleheads Garden CenterJordan Carter, director of sales and marketing, Leger & SonTR Clark, regional manager, F&W Forest ServicesHillery Culpepper, assistant director of development, FFA FoundationNicole Duvall, program coordinator, Commission for MilkDusty Engel, corporate precision ag manager, John DeereChan Flanders, forester, West FraserSusan Harrell, financial analyst and timberland ownerAaron Hemmer, regional lending manager, AgGeorgiaMatthew Hested, executive director of communications and strategy, Georgia Forestry AssociationJessica Jarvholhm, event coordinator, PineyWoods FarmBen Lancaster, sales manager, International Forest CompanyJason Little, director of valuation services, Forest Resource ConsultantsDavid Martin, president and CEO, Widget DevelopmentSamantha McLeod, executive director, Georgia Pecan Growers AssociationFrances Mitchell, field sales representative, BayerArren Moses, farmer, Edward Moses FarmsSarah Nerswick, agriculture education teacher and FFA advisor, Cambridge High SchoolErin Nessmith, Young Farmer and Rancher Program coordinator, Georgia Farm BureauBlake Poole, middle Georgia field representative, Office of Governor Brian KempEric Simpson, farmer and co-op organizer, West Georgia Farmer’s CooperativeKeaton Walker, marketing and sponsorship director, Georgia National Fairgrounds & AgricenterIn 1991, community and state leaders started participating in the original, agriculture-based leadership development program known as “Agri-Leaders,” which was sponsored by the Georgia Agri-Leaders Forum Foundation. Since that time, 399 Georgia business leaders, farmers, foresters, educators and other stakeholders have completed the program and become more effective leaders and advocates.Through AGL, participants will complete five in-state institutes, an advocacy institute in Washington, D.C., and an optional international experience in Chile. This will be the fourth class of AGL participants to experience transformational leadership development through the UGA program.Those seeking more information about AGL can visit www.agl.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Tesla’s Musk sees ‘gigantic’ potential in energy storage

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk says the Tesla big battery in South Australia has been so successful it will likely pay for itself within a few years, and has prompted interest from other governments to install even bigger batteries as a substitute for dirty and expensive gas peaking plants.Musk, in comments accompanying the company’s latest quarterly results, which showed a small profit for a second consecutive quarter, said the company’s battery storage business is likely to double in 2019, and promised increased production would reduce waiting times for both Powerwall and Powerpack batteries.“(Energy storage) is going to be a gigantic business,” Musk told an analysts briefing later. The $96 million Tesla big battery in South Australia, officially known as the Hornsdale Power Reserve, and owned and operated by Neoen, has been a stunning success – not just with the speed, versatility and accuracy of its performance, but also its contribution to grid stability and reliability, and its ability to deliver significant savings and make money on its own account.“While the Hornsdale battery that we built in South Australia is still the largest battery in the world, we have recently received multiple requests to build significantly larger battery projects,” Musk said in the statement.Musk said that Tesla deployed 1.04GWh of battery storage in 2018, a three-fold increase over the previous year, and expects it to double again in 2019 as a new manufacturing line at Gigafactory 1 in Nevada boosts the output of both Powerwall and Powerpack modules.More: Musk says Tesla big battery to pay for itself within a few years, bigger ones on the way Tesla’s Musk sees ‘gigantic’ potential in energy storagelast_img read more

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U.S. Navy Presents New Weapons against Drug Trafficking

first_img In addition, Rear Adm. Harris stated that according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, there are currently one million less cocaine users in the United States. “Can we do more? Should we do more? The answer to both questions is yes,” he said. Unlike the Puma, which is a radio-controlled aircraft with a 2.8-meter wingspan and weighs less than 15 pounds, the TIF-25K Aerostat is a 23-meter long helium-filled balloon. Surrounded by journalists, and before stepping aboard the Swift, a grey catamaran that has been docked for more than a week in Key West, at the extreme end of the Florida Peninsula, Harris addressed the recent cuts in the U.S. Military budget. He said that taking advantage of existing technologies to do more with less resources constitutes a way to demonstrate the strong commitment that the U.S. has in the fight against illicit trafficking. The recorded images also provide evidence that might help prevent legal cases from falling apart once they get to court, so that the criminals can be duely punished. These include the TIF-25K Tethered Aerostat blimp, and the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) Puma, both of which have already proven positive in the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, but are now being tested by the U.S. Navy to decide if in working together as one system, they can play a leading role in other missions. This commitment is headed by the Joint Interagency Task Force – South (JIATF-S), a component of the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). In January 2012, JIATF-S initiated a multinational operation against drug trafficking on the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of Central America, including efforts and resources from countries in the Western Hemisphere and Europe. After arriving from a trip to South America, Rear Adm. Harris said that the partner nations in the Western Hemisphere might also benefit from using these tools. “I just arrived from Colombia, one of our strongest partners in the fight against drug trafficking, and I mentioned to them what we are doing because I think it might be useful for them.” Early in 2013, U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly, SOUTHCOM commander, warned the U.S. Congress that the budget cuts would imply that the frigates USS Gary and USS Thach that were deployed at sea in support of Operation Martillo would cease plowing the Caribbean in search of go-fasts, aircraft and evasive semisubmersibles. Standing on the Swift’s platform, Rear Adm. Harris received instructions to launch the Puma. “It is very easy,” the flight instructor assured him, while trying to squeeze in a few minutes all his experience with hundreds of launches. Harris held the plane with both hands, took a step to build momentum and launched it with its tip pointing to the blue sky in the Florida Strait. Seeing through the eyes of the Puma also offers a clear advantage for the U.S. Coast Guard personnel on the Swift. “Mainly, what we like is that based on the images we receive, we can mitigate risks,” U.S. Coast Guard First Class Petty Officer Kenneth Christian stated. In coming days, the Swift will depart Key West on a three-week mission in support of Operation Martillo in Caribbean waters. The proposed “hunting grounds for illicit trafficking” would include Belize, Guatemala and northern Honduras. The catamaran will carry two new weapons against drug traffickers that will continue to be tested, this time in a real scenario. The U.S. Navy is planning to use the blimp and the UAV together to persistently cover an area much wider than the one covered by the Swift without support from a plane or helicopter. The goal? To catch more drug traffickers with fewer resources. center_img Tethered to the boat by a fiber optic cable, the impressive white blimp rises over the Swift’s flight deck. In better financial times, surveillance aircraft would land and take off on that same platform. And although at first glance it is a balloon like so many others, the modern radar that spins constantly below the Aerostat’s belly and its powerful built-in camera make it a key tool in detecting maritime targets. The Raven Vista 50 KW radar considerably widens the range to detect vessels that are beyond the horizon. That “vision” reaches its peak when the balloon is floating at 2,000 feet. Drug traffickers that prowl around in the waters of the Caribbean might soon be the target of two new weapons that the U.S Navy is testing to determine if their functionality as future platforms to conduct counter drug operations in the maritime and littoral environments. It also became known that the flight hours of P-3 Orion airplanes and surveillance helicopters, which are key during drug interdictions, might be drastically cut as well. “Necessity is the mother of invention,” Rear Admiral Sinclair Harris, U.S. Navy 4th Fleet commander, stated during a technology demonstration aboard the High Speed Vessel HSV 2 Swift. During the first year of Operation Martillo, drug trafficking received heavy blows when the transport of hundreds of tons of cocaine aimed at the U.S. market were interdicted followed by hundreds of arrests. “We know we have to attack the drug supply and demand at the same time. Last year, we were able to confiscate between 152 and 200 metric tons of cocaine in the sea,” he said, adding that over 67% of seizures were done with partner nations, a significant increase. And if the “eyes” of the steerable cannot provide a clear image of the suspicious vessel, the UAV Puma would come into action. At the end of the day, when journalists and other participants left the demonstration aboard the Swift, the crew started preparing for what will be their last military mission. By Dialogo May 02, 2013 I welcome everything that is done to help drug control, even though some authorities in the area don’t provide facilities for this work. Good for the USA, who are always the ones introducing innovations. It is obvious that, in order to control and decrease the illicit traffic of drugs and other wrongs that affect Central America, it is necessary to use the surprise effect of new technologies. I boarded the Swift in the summer of 2011 in the Guatemalan Pacific and it is without a doubt a ship of great efficiency, even when the technologies that we’re shown here are the ones on board of the Swift, regardless of its route on air and sea space. Congratulations on that attempt to minimize, with provable results, the problems affecting the region.last_img read more

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Long Island’s Pathetic Utility Preparation Always Leaves Us Powerless for the Next Bad Storm

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York With a thunderclap, Syosset residents awoke long before dawn to witness what looked like a strobe light outside as flashes of lightning illuminated the darkness. In East Northport, thunder rattled the windows—and the storm was just getting started. The weather system strengthened rapidly in its steady march across the North Shore, slamming into Stony Brook, St. James and the Three Village area.On Tuesday morning, Long Islanders saw scenes reminiscent of Superstorm Sandy. Large, old-growth trees blocked the streets, utility poles were snapped, Long Island Rail Road service was disrupted, and around 68,000 Long Islanders found themselves without power. By 5 p.m. the following day, an estimated 21,000 remained without power in the hardest hit areas as restoration efforts lasted well into the night.The Town of Brookhaven was slammed so badly—and the restoration effort handled so ineffectively—that Town Supervisor Ed Romaine issued a press release excoriating PSEG Long Island. He said the utility had promised to provide six repair crews but as of 4 p.m. he said that only two crews had been dispatched to the town.“Our residents deserve a quick response to this local disaster,” Romaine said.The powerful predawn thunderstorm exposed the glaring weakness of our region’s aging infrastructure. Once again, LI had a rude awakening. Our antiquated overhead wires, those pregnable pole-mounted transformers and a utility not up to the task of adequately serving the needs of our region.“The amount of damage and the widespread nature of such is not too common, and doesn’t happen too often,” said Michael Leona, a professional freelance meteorologist. “I believe this is the most widespread damage on Long Island since Sandy.”Prior to Tuesday’s destruction, he said that the most recent non-tropical storm damage was from a powerful nor’easter in March 2010 that affected southern Nassau County.Leona observed that severe thunderstorms packing what are called straight-line winds of 70-90 mph are not common here. He declined to suggest whether this system represented the “new normal” weather pattern but said that Long Islanders are certainly more attuned to what’s occurring in the air and on the ground thanks to social media and smartphones.“I don’t know if stronger storms are happening more often,” Leona told me, “but the public will know about it extensively and very quickly.”Leona touches upon an interesting trend. It seems that Long Islanders have more awareness of the weather, and thanks to bursts of severe occurrences—be they blizzards, nor’easters, thunderstorms or large-scale extreme events like hurricanes and tornadoes—more attention is being given to the impacts these storms have. On the regional level, storm preparation has spurred fortification of coastal areas, elevation of houses on the South Shore and even condemnation of properties on Fire Island to make way for protective dunes. Yet, despite these measures, our infrastructure, especially our power lines, remain vulnerable.For Long Islanders, it is an all-too-familiar scenario. A storm hits, trees topple and the lights go off, but it is too easy to place blame solely on PSEG Long Island, mainly because the Island’s storm vulnerability long predates their oversight of the grid. By continuing to expand and rebuild out antiquated method of power delivery, we shall continue to ensure that whenever the strong winds blow, darkness will result.Unfortunately, the solution to our electricity woes is both complex and very costly.According to News 12 Long Island, “An independent study commissioned by LIPA in 2005 found that burying wires on Long Island could cost $25 to $30 billion. The study says it would raise electricity rates by 150 percent over 25 years.”Long Islanders know all too well how utilities in the region handle large-scale projects and debt management, so the political will to move forward will be weak at best. But that doesn’t mean burying the lines isn’t necessary.A small, yet effective step easy to implement would be for local governments to mandate that new residential subdivisions place their power lines underground. While most of Nassau and western Suffolk counties is predominately built up, this requirement would at least ensure some resiliency from eastern Brookhaven to points eastward.This thunderstorm was rare, but it wreaked havoc on North Shore communities. Policymakers should look at the big picture. As devastating as Superstorm Sandy was for LI, it barely classified as a Category 1 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The September 1938 hurricane dubbed “The Long Island Express,” which carved out the Shinnecock Inlet and shattered the East End, was a Category 3.Yes, Sandy was weak by comparison, yet we’re still feeling its impacts. The recent thunderstorm was even weaker, and thousands of Long Islanders remained without power for two days afterwards.We need to start seriously exploring where, and why, our electrical grid is vulnerable against storms—and enact workable solutions. Additional tree-trimming and maintenance efforts, paired with new requirements for buried power lines, are a good place to start. Once the grid is adequately assessed, we can address the weakest points in the grid and ensure that when the next bad storm comes, the lights will stay on.What will it take for Long Island to be ready? Let’s not wait another day to find out.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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When motivation isn’t enough: Inspire employees to strive

first_img 33SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Have you ever called a “push-truck” to take your car to the mechanic?Probably not, and for good reason – in physics, when one object pushes another on a level surface the weight of the object pushes back and creates more friction. The result? More force has to be applied.Now, when you pull a heavy object, the pulling force is only working against the friction of the object itself, and therefore less force is needed; hence the “tow-truck.”What does an understanding of pushing and pulling have to do with leading organizations?More than you might think. How often have you heard leaders say, “We need to figure out what drives our employees,” or read blog titles proclaiming, “The 10 Drivers of Employee Engagement.” Motivation isn’t enough; you have to inspire your employees to strive. continue reading »last_img read more

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Sweden tops EU for new cases but says virus is slowing

first_imgSweden, whose softer approach to fighting the novel coronavirus drew global attention, has one of the EU’s highest rates of new cases but authorities say the spread is slowing.In the last two weeks, Sweden was only second to Luxembourg in the EU in terms of new cases per capita with new infections more than six times the European Union average.Unlike most European nations, Sweden never imposed a lockdown and made headlines for its high death toll. In May, Sweden was testing roughly 30,000 people a week but throughout June that was scaled up and in July the figure had more than doubled.On May 31, the country had recorded a total of 39,160 cases. On July 16, the number had almost doubled at 76,877, but deaths had only increased by just over 20 percent to 5,593. Row with WHO In late June, the rising number of cases led the World Health Organization’s European branch to put Sweden on a list of 11 countries witnessing an “accelerated transmission.”But Sweden’s state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell lashed out, calling it a “total misinterpretation” of data.Sweden’s Public Health Agency instead has repeatedly stressed that the large increase is mostly made up of milder cases, which would have gone unnoticed previously.US President Donald Trump has similarly said that the surges in cases around the US are related to increased testing.But unlike the US, the rise in cases in Sweden has not been accompanied by an increase in intensive care unit admissions.Karin Tegmark Wisell, head of microbiology at the Public Health Agency, told AFP that the decline in serious cases is also likely a product of barrier gestures.”People have learnt how to relate to the disease, to keep distance. We have become better at protecting the risk groups,” Tegmark Wisell said.Sweden’s high mortality has often been traced to the disease hitting retirement homes. Nearly half of all Swedish COVID-19 deaths are from care homes. It has kept schools for under-16s open and has not shuttered cafes, bars, restaurants and most businesses. Masks have been recommended only for healthcare personnel.Over the past 60 days, Sweden has seen a drastic increase in the number of new cases, but authorities stress that serious COVID-19 cases and associated deaths have declined.”If you increase testing you will find more cases,” deputy state epidemiologist Anders Wallensten told AFP. “But the more serious cases, those who become sick and need hospital care have rather decreased,” Wallensten added.center_img Topics : Missing component Peaking at over 600 deaths a week at retirement homes alone in early April, the numbers have progressively gone down.Emma Spak, head of healthcare at the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, said healthcare has improved after many health workers were caught off guard when the virus first struck.”It’s not only elderly care that’s got better at handling COVID-19 during these months, but all healthcare,” Spak said.Swedish officials have argued that lockdowns only work temporarily and that drastic short-term measures are too ineffective to justify their impact.Antoine Flahault, a professor of public health at the University of Geneva, said Sweden’s mistake was not the no-lockdown policy but late mass testing.”What is really sad for Sweden is that it did not combine the ambitious policy with massive testing,” Flahault told AFP.Flahault, while stressing that the current number of deaths was still significant, said the high mortality rate was more due to shortfalls in testing than not shuttering schools, bars or restaurants.Testing milder cases, he said, allows these people to self-isolate for fear of “contaminating their families,” he said.last_img read more

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Wilma Mulford, 88

first_imgWilma Mulford, 88, of Dillsboro passed away Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at the Christ Hospital in Cincinnati. She was born in Elrod on July 21st, 1928, the daughter of Harley and Effie Rahe May. She was married to Jim Mulford on December 6, 1964 at Green Chapel Church in Elrod. Survivors include her husband, one son; Gary (Bonnie) Miller of Vernon, Indiana, one daughter; Bonnie Cole of Milan, one grandson; Jim (Sandy) Cole of Dillsboro and four great grandchildren; Chris, Brandi, Jamie and T.J. She was preceded in death by her parents. She was a former employee of the Big Wheel, Colonial Cottage and Deutsch Pride. Wilma also attended Washington Baptist Church. Funeral services for Wilma will be held on Saturday, January 28th at 10:30am at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with Jack Bible officiating. Burial will be in the Washington Cemetery in Elrod. Visitation will be Friday from 5pm to 7pm. Memorials may be given to the Margaret Mary Hospice in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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