IRC says it has no control over rise in fuel surcharge

first_imgLocalNews IRC says it has no control over rise in fuel surcharge by: – May 4, 2012 Sharing is caring! 14 Views   no discussions Share Tweetcenter_img Share Share (L-R): IRC’s Chairman Eluid Williams, Lance McCaskey, IRC’s Public Consumer Relations Manager Mara Ettiene-Manley, IRC Commissioner Cassel, and Dr. Eisenhower Douglas The International Regulatory Commission (IRC) has said that it has no control over the increase in fuel surcharge on the island.The IRC met with the media on Thursday, to discuss the rise in the fuel surcharge currently being experienced.Executive Director of the IRC Lance McCaskey says the organization has been trying to minimize the surcharge which is particularly due to increases in fuel prices.He explained that because the world has been experiencing a steady rise in fuel prices in recent times, this has caused fuel prices paid by DOMLEC to move from $11.74 per gallon in January 2012 to $12.59 in April 2012.“Since Dominica is highly dependent on the use of fossil fuel for its electricity generation, these increases have been affecting us. The trouble is that DOMLEC as well as the IRC do not have control over these rises,” he explained.According to McCaskey, from January of 2012, the fuel surcharge that consumer have been paying have been increasing“Those who have their electricity bills would see that the fuel surcharge in January was $0.40/KWh that rose to $0.50/KWh in April. We have been working closely with DOMLEC all the time to see how we could minimize the impact of the rises in fuel prices. We have also been looking at the fuel system to ensure that the information of fuel used in generation in any one month is acceptable and correct,” he said.The IRC, he noted, has also been working with DOMLEC on improving the efficiency of their generators. “Last year and beginning the year before, we did a fuel audit and we recalibrated all the dip sticks that DOMLEC used to arrive at the fuel used every month. We also had them changed out their meters twice. They realized that the meters were not right; they advised us that they were not right and we worked with them to change those meters. They were changed, put in place by the end of January but they have not all been working properly. Eleven were changed, ten are working properly”.McCaskey also announced that Dominica is not the only Caribbean island facing increase fuel surcharge as in April 2012 three other islands rates were; St. Vincent 56.62 cents, Grenada 67.84 cents and Barbados 67 cents.He reassured the public however that the IRC remains committed to ensuring that the interests of electricity consumers are protected and that where possible, the impact of rising fuel prices will be kept to a minimum.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

Read more

Duterte offers P10-M reward to any Filipino who can invent COVID vaccine

first_img Roque added the President has also pledged a “substantial” grant to the laboratories of the University of the Philippines and the Philippine General Hospital (PGH) to boost efforts towards producing a cure for the deadly disease. President Rodrigo Duterte is offering a P10-million reward for any Filipino who can develop a vaccine against the coronavirus disease 2019, his spokesperson Harry Roque says. PCOO Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque made the announcement in a virtual press conference on Tuesday as the world has yet to discover a medicine that can cure the virus. “Dahil public enemy number one nga itong COVID-19, hindi lang dito sa Pilipinas kundi sa buong mundo, inanunsyo ng Pangulo na siya ay magbibigay ng pabuya na hanggang P10 milyon sa kahit sinong Pilipino na makakadiskubre ng vaccine laban sa COVID-19,” Roque said. Currently, PGH doctors have been trying an experimental plasma therapy for patients in critical condition. Scientists are checking if they can tap the antibodies developed by a recovered person to help a struggling patient combat the infection. MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte is offering a P10-million reward for any Filipino who can develop a vaccine against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).center_img COVID-19 is a disease caused by a coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2, which is related to the virus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome but not as deadly. The disease is spread through small droplets from the nose or mouth when people infected with the virus cough or sneeze./PN For this process, the plasma – or the liquid portion of the blood from someone who once battled the coronavirus – carries antibodies, which will be infused into a patient’s system with hopes to boost the chances of recovery. Outside of the Philippines, there are dozens of pharmaceutical firms racing against time in coming up with a viable treatment. Several drug companies in the United States and China have started clinical trials for potential cures.last_img read more

Read more

Area Basketball Scores (1-4)

first_imgArea Basketball ScoresThursday  (1-4)Boys ScoresRivertown ClassicSouth Dearborn  61     Switz. County  51Lawrenceburg  73     Rising Sun  56Girls ScoresNorth Decatur  56     South Decatur  44Austin  45     SW Hanover  32Greenwood Christian  44     Hauser  25Shawe Memorial  56     Rock Creek Academy  49Shelby County TourneyWaldron  43     Morristown  29Triton Central  53     SW Shelby  34last_img

Read more

Drivers pre-entered for Super Nationals

first_imgBOONE, Iowa – The list of drivers pre-entered for the Sept. 4-9 IMCA Speedway Motors Super nationals fueled by Casey’s Sept. 4-9 at Boone Speedway includes:Modifieds: Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas; Coty Albers, Wellsburg; Mike Albertsen, Audubon; Ricky Alvarado, Delta, Colo.; Drew Armstrong, Alexander, Ark.; Robby Arnold, Marmaduke, Ark.; J.D. Auringer, Evansdale; Robert Avery, Des Moines; Trevor Baker, Omaha, Neb.; Josh Beaulieu, Be­midji, Minn.; Tommy Belmer, Evansdale; Dennis Betzer, Central City; Tanner Black, Great Bend, Kan.; Josh Blumer, Marysville, Kan.; Steven Bowers Jr., Topeka, Kan.; Jason Brinkman, DeWitt, Neb.; David Brown, Kellogg; Kyle Brown, Madrid; and Randy Brown, Chowchilla, Calif.Kenneth Buck, Canton, Pa.; Ronnie Burkhardt, Topeka, Kan.; Joel Bushore, Boone; Jeff Cardi­nale, Syracuse, N.Y.; Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa; Drew Christianson, Minot, N.D.; Chad Clancy, Polo, Mo.; Duane Cleveland, Olivehurst, Calif.; Curtis Cook, Conway, Ark.; Taylor Cook, Stanley, N.C.; Todd Cooney, Des Moines; Troy Cordes, Dunkerton; Kent Croskey, Fort Dodge; Bob Dan­iels, Des Moines; Cory Davis, Eunice, N.M.; Shane DeMey, Denison; Chris Derenne, Luxemburg. Wis.; Brenten DeYoung, Carson City, Mich.; and Myron DeYoung, Stanton, Mich.Russ Dickerson, Boone; Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif.; Scott Drake, Joplin, Mo.; Corey Dripps, Reinbeck; Tyler Droste, Waterloo; Darin Duffy, Urbana; Joe Duvall, Claremore, Okla.; Bruce Ege­land, Marshall, Minn.; Chase Ellington, Iowa Falls; Eric Elliott, Boone; Robert Fleshman, Merrill; Tyler Frye, Belleville, Kan.; Josh Gilman, Earlham; J.T. Goodson, Little Rock, Ark.; William Gould, Cal­era, Okla.; Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb.; Rik Gropp, Lincoln, Neb.; Matt Guillaume, Has­let, Texas; Jimmy Gustin, Marshalltown; and Garry Hall, Rochester, Minn.Larry Hall, Rochester, Minn.; Travis Hatcher, Honey Creek; Clint Hatlestad, Glencoe, Minn.; Colby Heishman, Brooklyn; Lloyd Henderson, Bouton; Shane Hiatt, Rising City, Neb.; Leland Hibdon, Pahrump, Neb.; Jason Hickingbottom, Ogden; Tony Hilgenberg, Waukee; Michael Hines, Van Buren, Ark.; Robby Hines, Mena, Ark.; Jesse Hoeft, Forest City; Scott Hogan, Vinton; Mat Hollerich, Good Thunder, Minn.; Racer Hulin, Laurel; Mitchell Hunt, Greenville, Mich.; Gavin Hun­yady, Fenton, Mich.; Todd Inman, Altoona; Vern Jackson, Waterloo; and Mike Jergens, Plover.Aaron Johnson, Brainerd, Minn.; Adam Johnson, Independence; Kody Johnson, Vestaburg, Mich.; Wayne Johnson, Minot, N.D.; Matthew Kiner, Aurora, Neb.; Trey Kline, Schleswig; Cody Knecht, Whittemore; Brian Knoell, Falun, Kan.; Corey Lagroon, Salina, Kan.; Keith Lamphere, Monroeton, Pa.; Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif.; Dennis LaVeine, West Burlington; Cody Leonard, Sinton, Texas; Gatlin Leytham, Toledo; Mike Lineberry, Fremont, Neb.; Kristopher Lloyd, Peach Orchard, Ark.; Daniel Loggins, Sioux City; and Brandon Long, Suamico, Wis.Josh Long, Little Suamico, Wis.; Trent Loverude, New Ulm, Minn.; Clint Luellen, Minburn; Jim Lynch, Bloomfield; Joe McBirnie, Boone; Mike McCarthy, Hutto, Texas; Randy McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif.; Ryan McDaniel, Olivehurst, Calif.; Raymond McSpadden, Buda, Texas; Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo.; Matthew Meinecke, Jamaica; Chad Melton, Mineral Wells, Texas; Dan Menk, Franklin, Minn.; R.J. Merchant, Sioux City; Nick Meyer, Whittemore; Rich Michael Jr., Is­chua, N.Y.; Chris Mills, Sioux City; and Jeremy Mills, Garner.Brett Moffitt, Mooresville, N.C.; Clay Money, Penokee, Kan.; Bob Moore, Sioux City; Josh Moulton, Rush City, Minn.; Richard Mueller, Jackson, Wyo.; Joe Mullins, Boulder, Colo.; Jason Murray, Hartford; Schuyler Nahre, Indianapolis, Ind.; Jordy Nelson, Marysville, Kan.; Jay Note­boom, Hinton; Justin O’Brien, West Union; Scott Olson, Blairsburg; Colton Osborn, Lexington, Neb.; Chris Palsrok, Sibley; John Parmeley, Phoenix, Ariz.; and Jeremy Payne, Tucson, Ariz.Jason Payton, Fort Smith, Ark.; Bobby Pearish, Oronogo, Mo.; Dave Pedersen, Brady, Neb.; James Peeler, Trimble, Mo.; Loren Pesicka Jr., Burt; Mike Petersilie, Hoisington, Kan.; Kurtis Pihl, Fa­lun, Kan.; Bill Pittaway, Corpus Christi, Texas; Ron Pope, Mason City; Chad Porter, Madison Lake, Minn.; Joey Price, Great Falls, Mont.; David Pries, Medaryville, Ind.; Tyler Prochaska, Iowa Falls; Dan Ratajczak, Luxemburg, Wis.; Alex Reetz, Dunlap; and Craig Reetz, Dunlap.Chett Reeves. Bakersfield, Calif.; Jimmy Reeves, Albert, Kan.; James Reichart, Des Moines; Terry Rentfro, Davenport; Jesse Richter, Great Bend, Kan.; Anthony Roth, Columbus, Neb.; Josh Ruby, Lakota; Joel Rust, Grundy Center; Ryan Ruter, Clear Lake; Jaxon Saathoff, Beatrice, Neb.; Johnny Saathoff, Beatrice, Neb.; Cory Sample, Winnemucca, Nev.; Cory Sauerman, Johnston; Ashley Schaaf, Lincoln, Neb.; Troy Schaberg, Amity, Ark.; and Jason Schneiders, North Sioux City, S.D.Kody Scholpp, Estevan, Sask.; Jeff Schroyer, Elkhorn, Neb.; J.J. Scott, Iowa City; D.J. Shannon, Merced, Calif.; John Shoptaw, Mena, Ark.; Kelly Shryock, Fertile; Todd Shute, Des Moines; Scott Simatovich, State Center; Riley Simmons, Susanville, Calif.; Marvin Skinner, Mansfield, Texas; Andrew Smith, Rogersville, Mo.; Brad Smith, Horseheads, N.Y.; Dylan Smith, Osceola, Neb.; Jason Snyder, Dunkerton; Tony Snyder, Readlyn; Joe Spillman, Austin, Texas; Mat Stallbaumer, Tecumseh, Kan.; and Jay Steffens, North Platte, Neb.Ricky Stephan, South Sioux City, Neb.; Jeff Stephens, Arion; Todd Stinehart, Waseca, Minn.; Paul Stone, Winton, Calif.; Nicholas Stormzand, Lowell, Mich.; Jeff Streeter, Madera, Calif.; Ste­phen Streeter, Madera, Calif.; Mike Streigel, Hermitage, Mo.; Kyle Strickler, Mooresville, N.C.; Tyler Sutton, Beloit, Kan.; Tyler Sutton, Beloit, Kan.; Regan Tafoya, Farmington, N.M.; Peyton Taylor, Batesville, Ark.; Wade Taylor, Spring Creek, Nev.; Chad Ten Napel, Sioux City; and Ed Thomas, Waterloo.And Ricky Thornton Jr., Chandler, Ariz.; Andy Tiernan, Madrid; Eric Tomlinson, Robinson, Texas; Josh Truman, Indianola; Mike Van Genderen, Newton; Harvey Vande Weerd, Alton; Josh Vogt, Canton, Kan.; A.J. Ward, Ionia, Mich.; Billy Ward, Cobleskill, N.Y.; Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz.; Will Ward, Cobleskill, N.Y.; Tim Watts, Beloit, Kan.; Chad Wernette, Sheridan, Mich.; Brandon Wil­liams, Des Moines; Albert Wolfgram, Boone; Jason Wolla, Ray, N.D.; Cory Wray, Trenton, Mo.; Jerry Wren, Howard Lake, Minn.; and Jeremy Zorn, Russell, Kan.Stock Cars: Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas; Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas; Mike Al­bertsen, Audubon; Pete Alexander, Albert Lea, Minn.; Zachary Ankrum, Sioux City; Travis Baird, Sharon, Okla.; Kevin Balmer, Garwin; Travis Barker, Sioux City; Jayden Bears, Smithville, Mo.; Michael Bilyeu, Indianola; Brian Blessington, Breda; Randy Brands, Boyden; Josh Brauckman, Carroll; Tyler Brauckman, Carroll; Billy Briley, Midland, Texas; Kevin Bruck, Dunlap; John Bruegman, Elkhorn, Neb.; Shaun Bruns, Danube, Minn.; Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa; Bob Cha­lupa, McCook, Neb.; and Norman Chesmore, Rowley.Jeremy Christians, Horicon, Wis.; Ronnie Christopher, Forney, Texas; Tim Clonch, Quinlan, Texas; Brandon Conkwright, Wamego, Kan.; Caleb Crenshaw, Fort Worth, Texas; Larry Cro­check, Boone; Brandon Czarapata, Pulaski, Wis.; Russell Damme, Waterloo; Michael Dancer, North Platte, Neb.; Josh Daniels, Carlisle; Dan Day, Princeton, Texas; Paul Diefenthaler, Mani­towoc, Wis.; Mel Elsberry, Orange City; Robert Engelkes, Dike; Austin Evens, Independence; Kyle Everts, Holland; Marcus Fagan, Adair; Kevin Flock, Muskogee, Okla.; Tommy Fose, Del­phos, Kan.; Todd Gereau, Sioux City; Wayne Gifford, Boone; Joey Giles, Kaufman, Texas; and Mike Goodson, Overbrook, Okla.Craig Graham, Webster City; Derek Green, Granada, Minn.; Aaron Guillaume, Sioux City; Cody Gustoff, Scranton; Ryan Harris, Hubbard, Neb.; Ron Hartman, Ulysses, Kan.; John Heinz, Green Bay, Wis.; Robert Hoing, Overton, Neb.; Paul Holschuh; Mitch Hovden, Decorah; Abe Huls, Car­thage, Ill.; Todd Inman, Altoona; Troy Jerovetz, Webster City; Casey Jones, Sioux City; Ned Ka­lis, Wells, Minn.; Jeffrey Kaup, Woodward, Okla.; Reid Keller, Webster City; Greg Keuhn, Tren­ton, Mo.; Wayne Landheer, Thompson; Dustin Larson, Worthington, Minn.; Jerry Leary, Little Sua­mico, Wis.; Chad LeGere, Ankeny; Jake Ludeking, Decorah; Jesse Lund, Greenfield; Les Lundquist, Sioux City; and Mathias Lux, Hartley.Dalton Lynch, Bloomfield; Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg, Minn.; Kirk Martin, Weatherford, Texas; Dustin Matlock, Oklahoma City, Okla.; Keith Mattox, Ray, N.D.; Kevin Mattox, Ray, N.D.; Dave Mehmen, Baxter; Derek Moede, New Franken, Wis.; Angel Munoz, Lamar, Colo.; Michael Mur­phy, Jefferson; Trent Murphy, Jefferson; Damon Murty, Chelsea; Justin Nehring, Storm Lake; Jake Nelson, Williston, N.D.; Mike Nichols, Harlan; John Oliver Jr., Danville; Aaron Olson, Meki­nock, N.D.; Kevin Opheim, Mason City; Vernon Owens, Leander, Texas; Chad Palmer, Renwick; Donnie Pearson, Oskaloosa; Rich Pederson, Sioux City; Blake Peeler, Trimble, Mo.; Michael Pep­per, Lakin, Kan.; and Mike Petersilie, Hoisington, Kan.Tyler Pickett, Boxholm; Corey Piffer, Indianola; Brandon Pruitt, Stuart; Jason Purvis, Boone; Dustin Reeh, Council Bluffs; Scott Reinhardt, Baileys Harbor, Wis.; Todd Reitzler, Grinnell; Eric Rempel, Palmyra, Neb.; Ondre Rexford, Montezuma, Kan.; Rod Richards, Madrid; Bryan Rigsby, Topeka, Kan.; Anthony Ritterbush, Dunlap; Justin Roberts, Sachse, Texas; Jason Rogers, Sel­den, Kan.; Kevin Rogers, Mesquite, Texas; Kevin Rose, Waterloo; Matt Schauer, Arlington, Minn.; Jerry Schipper, Dike; Tony Schlei, Union Grove, Wis.; Allen Schmidt, Holstein; Jay Schmidt, Tama; and Kellie Schmit, Britt.Jason Schoenberger, Russell, Kan.; Jason See, Albia; Chad Smith, Trimble, Mo.; David Smith, Lake City; Devin Smith, Lake City; Donavon Smith, Lake City; Mark Smith, Hennessey, Okla.; Michael Smith, Hennessey, Okla.; Joe Spillman, Austin, Texas; Dusty Springer, Colby, Kan.; Co­rey Stapleton, Denison; Mike Stapleton, Denison; Josh Steele, Platte City, Mo.; Robert Stofer, Jefferson; Stephen Streeter, Madera, Calif.; Buck Swanson, Waterloo; Stefan Sybesma, Sanborn; To­bie Talk, Hawley, Texas; Brad Te Grotenhuis, Orange City; Justin Temeyer, Independence; and Justin Thornton, Chandler, Ariz.And Christopher Toot, Albert Lea, Minn.; Darin Toot, Albert Lea, Minn.; Jeff Tubbs, Colby, Kan.; Heath Tulp, Britt; Mike Van Genderen, Newton; Dusty Van Horn, Atlantic; Travis Van Straten, Horton­ville, Wis.; Kyle Vanover, Beatrice, Neb.; Jason Vansickel, Webster City; Don Vis, State Center; Mike Vondrak, Galva; Billy Wade, San Angelo, Texas; Shawn Wagner, Lena, Wis.; Bar­rett Wagoner, Colby, Kan.; Mathew West, Kellerton; Brad Whitney, Trenton, Mo.; Nathan Wood, Sigourney; Brett Woznicki, Minot, N.D.; Jason York, Boone; Elijah Zevenbergen Ocheyedan; Al­len Zimmerman, Central City, Neb.; and Mark Zorn, Russell, Kan.Hobby Stocks: Gregg Anderson, Perry; Jeff Anderson, Atlantic; Shannon Anderson, Des Moines; Adam Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb.; Paul Atchison, Webster City; Daniel Ayers, Webster City; Jim Ball, Independence; Nathan Ballard, Marengo; Drew Barglof, Sioux Rapids; Charlie Bar­tels, Lincoln, Neb.; Tommy Beekman, Otho; Solomon Bennett, Minburn; Luke Bird, Winthrop; Ryan Boland, Fort Dodge; Andrew Borchardt, Plymouth; Alex Boyden, Harveyville, Kan.; Austin Brauner, Platte Center, Neb.; John Briggs, Cherokee; and Matt Brown, Dysart.Andrew Burg, Carlisle; and David Castellano Jr., Des Moines; Andrew Claus, Spencer; Craig Clift, Sioux City; Chris Cox, Boone; Eric Cross, Salina, Kan.; Kyle Davis, Hinton; Brian Derry, Collins; Kevin Derry, Madrid; Stephen Doss, Boone; Jacob Floyd, Cedar Rapids; Jason Fusselman, Shelby; Nathan Gegner, Morgan, Minn.; Devon Gonas, Midale, Sask.; Cole Hanshew, Minot, N.D.; Carl Hanson, Estevan, Sask.; and Tory Harazin, Redwood Falls, Minn.Jacob Harms, Beatrice, Neb.; Zach Hemmingsen, Marne; Sal Hernandez, Columbus, Neb.; Tyler Hinrichs, Americus, Kan.; Andy Hoffman, Sioux City; Chanse Hollatz, Clear Lake; Benji Irvine, Oelwein; Tyler Jackson, Lincoln, Neb.; Austin Jahnz, Lewisville, Minn.; Wes Jahnz, St. James, Minn.; Roger Jenniges, Echo, Minn.; Bryant Johnson, Graettinger; Darin Johnson, Dickens; Tan­ner Jones, Oqallala, Neb.; Jim Kimmel, Norfolk, Neb.; Eric Knutson, Slater; Jason Kohl, Missouri Valley; Marcus Kyle, Boone; and Parker Larson, Granada, Minn.Adam Lee, Salix; Chad Lonneman, Adrian, Minn.; Justin Luinenburg, Reading, Minn.; Dustin Lynch, Boone; David McQuiston, Van Meter; Corey Madden, Avoca; Dillon Magnussen, Newell; Ross Marshall, Johnston; Anthony Melcher, Monroe, Neb.; Paul Menard, Merrill; TeJay Mielke, Norfolk, Neb.; Brandon Nielsen, Spencer; Cody Nielsen, Spencer; Matt Olson, Franklin, Minn.; Tyson Overton, Carlisle; Gary Pesicka, Burt; Jordan Peters, Ankeny; and Jack Phillips, Mitch­ellville.Allison Pierce, Corning, N.Y.; Kelly Pihl, Lindsborg, Kan.; Austin Pinney, Laurens; Scott Pippert, Elberon; Riley Raynard, Lampman, Sask.; Justin Rezabek, Wilber, Neb.; David Rieks, Eldora; Kenny Roberts, Lincoln, Neb.; John Ross, Rushmore, Minn.; Aaron Rudolph, Grand Junction; Keeran Sampson, Worthington, Minn.; Malik Sampson, Worthington, Minn.; Danny Sassman, Fort Dodge; Jamie Schirm, Dexter; Allyn Shiveley, Lincoln, Neb.; Jay Sidles, Emmetsburg; Kyle Si­dles, Algona; David Simpson, Des Moines; Shawn Slezak, Milligan, Neb.; and Daniel Smith, Lake City.And Bryce Sommerfeld, Fort Dodge; Jamie Songer, Ankeny; Eric Stanton, Carlisle; Brian Stich, Topeka, Kan.; Jeremy Swanson, Strawberry Point; Adam Tiernan, Granger; Lenny Tucker, South Sioux City, Neb.; Brett Vanous, Quasqueton; Justin Wacha, Vinton; Matt Wahl, Norwalk; Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb.; Adam Watson, Martensdale; Daniel Wauters, Iowa City; Ryan Wells, Run­nells; Derek Willert, Rockford; Shaun Wirtz, Boone; and Leah Wroten, Independence.Northern SportMods: Justin Addison, Norfolk, Neb.; Nate Albrant, Thompson; Autum Anderson, Mason City; Paul Atchison, Webster City; Jeremy Baker, Nebraska City, Neb.; Austin Becerra, Bowen, Ill.; Kyle Bentley, Fairbank; Jimmy Berkevich Jr., Watertown, Wis.; Keith Blum, Betten­dorf; Adam Bohlman, Hinckley, Minn.; Alan Bohlman, Isanti, Minn.; Rich Bohlman, Tioga, N.D.; Lance Borgman, Beatrice, Neb.; Ethan Braaksma, Newton; and Nicholas Carpenter, Leaven­worth, Kan.Brayton Carter, Oskaloosa; Ben Chapman, Clarence; Doug Cook, Algona; Shawn Cooney, Des Moines; Brandon Dale, Arbela, Mo.; Bill Davis, Des Moines; Jeff Deal, Fort Dodge; Joe Docekal, Dysart; Robert Draper, Valparaiso, Neb.; Brian Efkamp, Ankeny; Thomas Egenberger, Des Moines; Timothy Elias, Chowchilla, Calif.; Vince Engebregtsen, Algoma, Wis.; Dennis Engel­haupt, Page, Neb.; Jeramie Faber, Burt; and Daniel Fellows, KeokukAlec Fett, Thompson; Colby Fett, Algona; Eric Folstad, Glenburn, N.D.; Austin Frye, Taft, Calif.; Craig Garner, Clarinda; Joey Haase, Norfolk, Neb.; Jarred Hackler, Juniata, Neb.; Jacob Hage­mann, Fort Ripley, Minn.; Derek Hall, Lincoln, Neb.; Shawn Harker, Nebraska City, Neb.; Travis Hartman, Burlington; J.J. Hashbarger, Bonduel, Wis.; Kent Haugland, Wesley; Cory Hemphill, Yuma, Ariz.; Crystal Hemphill, Yuma, Ariz.; Jerry Hinton, Adel; and Lonnie Hodges, Boone.David Hoover, Boone; Andrew Hunter, Independence; Andrew Inman, Mason City; Tyler Inman, Altoona; Tim Judd, Wall Lake; Adam Kaltenbach, Strafford, Mo.; Dave Kennedy, Sioux Falls, S.D.; Ronald Kibbe, Mount Pleasant; Levi Kiefer, Bakersfield, Calif.; Ryan King, Montour; Brian Konz, LeMars; Lucas Lamberies, Clintonville, Wis.; Colby Langenberg, Norfolk, Neb.; Tom Lath­rop, Ottumwa; Erik Laudenschlager, Minot, N.D.; and Ryan Leeman, Randall.Mark Leiting, Lincoln, Neb.; Jesse Levin, Salina, Kan.; Matt Lizotte, Minot, N.D.; Jeff Lloyd, Le Center, Minn.; Johnathon Logue, Boone; Hunter Longnecker, Woodward; Matt Looft, Swea City; Austin Luellen, Minburn; Jake McBirnie, Boone; Sean Manning, Bennington, Neb.; Dusty Maso­lini, Des Moines; Shane Meeks, Abilene, Kan.; Brett Meyer, Lytton; Cameron Meyer, Pierce, Neb.; Josh Meyer, Fairmont, Minn.; and Rusty Montagne, North Sioux City, S.D.Ariel Mueller, Hinckley, Minn.; Nathan Mumm, Harlan; Taylor Musselman, Urbandale; Christopher Myhre, Burt; George Nordman, Mason City; Zech Norgaard, Spencer; Dallas Nutt, Armstrong; Jared Nytroe, Brandon, S.D.; Kyle Olson, Cedar Rapids; Tony Olson, Cedar Rapids; Anthony On­stot, Norwalk; Brandon Ostwald, Algona; Jason Overholt, Arlington, Neb.; Hunter Parsons, Green Bay, Wis.; Rodger Peck, Minneapolis, Kan.; and Cory Pestotnik, Boone.Dylan Petersen, Harlan; Gunnar Pike, South Bend, Neb.; Jeremy Pittsenbarger, Cameron, Mo.; Aaron Plum, Sioux City; Austin Price, Alton; Bryan Rigsby, Topeka, Kan.; Danny Roe, Turlock, Calif.; Darin Roepke, LeMars; Cory Rose, Boone; Robby Rosselli, Minot, N.D.; Trent Roth, Colum­bus, Neb.; Darin Rothfus, Jefferson; Chase Rudolf, Prole; Chad Ryerson, Wellsburg; Jake Sachau, Denison; Joe Schidler, Omaha, Neb.; and Arie Schouten, Blair, Neb.Austin Schrage, Cresco; Brian Schrage, Cresco; Dakoda Sellers, Waverly; Brandon Setser, Daven­port; Chad Shaw, Trimble, Mo.; Miles Shelman, Ames; Jesse Skalicky, Fargo, N.D.; Doug Smith, Lanesboro; Tyler Soppe, Sherrill; Dakota Sproul, Ellis, Kan.; Tom Stark, Egg Harbor, Wis.; Austin Svoboda, David City, Neb.; Mike Tanner, Smithville, Mo.; Robbie Thome, Spalding, Neb.; Cody Thompson, Sioux City; Cullen Thompson, Hermann, Mo.; and Shawn Umentum, Green Bay, Wis.And Colten Van Hierden, Waupun, Wis.; Cameron Vande Weerd, Hospers; Connor Vande We­erd, Alton; Carter VanDenBerg, Oskaloosa; Curtis Veber, Polk City; Nelson Vollbrecht, Stanton; Timothy Warner, Malone, Wis.; John Watson, Des Moines; Tyler Watts, Beloit, Kan.; Cole Way­man, Lincoln, Neb.; Bill Wears, Des Moines; Bill Wegner, Armstrong; Kyle Welch, Sioux City; Cody Werner, Clearfield; Jaylen Wettengel, Topeka, Kan.; and Nate Whitehurst, Mason City.Late Models: Todd Cooney, Des Moines; Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown; Mark Elliott, Webster City; Jason Hahne, Webster City; Kirby Schultz, Albia; and Curt Schroeder, Newton.Sport Compacts: Kimberly Abbott, Camp Point, Ill.; Josh Barnes, Keokuk; Jake Benischek, Du­rant; Mitchell Bielenberg, Charlotte; Zach Bohlmeyer, Beatrice, Neb.; Jason Bolte, Odin, Minn.; Matt Brehmer, Sobieski, Wis.; Michael Brehmer, Oconto Falls, Wis.; Bubba Brown, Jackson, Minn.; Ryan Bryant, Mason City; Daniel Campbell, Muscatine; Jerry Coopman, Mankato, Minn.; Nate Coopman, Mankato, Minn.; Richard Crow, Grand Island, Neb.; and Jay DeVries, Spencer.Kaytee DeVries, Spencer; Scott Ellis, Marshalltown; Brandon Esparza, Phoenix, Ariz.; R.J. Esqueda, Madelia, Minn.; Brooke Fluckiger, Columbus, Neb.; Neil Forsberg, Slayton, Minn.; Stepha­nie Forsberg, Mankato, Minn.; Chuck Fullenkamp, West Point; John Gill, Marshalltown; Jarad Gross, Spencer; Brad Havel, Iowa City; Brooklyn Henderson, Tama; Tim Hovick, Clearfield; Seth Keiser, Fruitland; Jeff Klinkefus, Golden, Colo.; and Brandon Lambert, Carthage, Ill.And Brett Marshall, Maquoketa; Corey Mehrwerth, St. Stephen, Minn.; Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb.; William Michel, Muscatine; Trent Orwig, Ottumwa; Riley Paysen, Wall Lake; Cory Peters, Spencer; Mark Riney, Des Moines; James Roose, Grandview; Travis Thelander, Blue Hill, Neb.; Lezley Tubbs, Colby, Kan.; Tanner Uehling, Norfolk, Neb.;  Joshua Uhl; Ryan Westman, Ormsby, Minn.; Brendon Yamry, Rice, Minn.; and Mike Zitzer, Sheboygan, Wis.last_img read more

Read more

Blatter hails Fergie’s achievements

first_img Ferguson has had a career the likes of which will never be seen again. He won his 49th trophy in United’s 20th league championship. Blatter, who gave Ferguson with a lifetime achievement award last year, said on Twitter: “Just heard Sir Alex Ferguson is retiring at end of season. His achievements in the game place him without doubt as one of the ‘greats’.” UEFA president Michel Platini hailed Ferguson as “a true visionary”, and added: “Sir Alex has made a massive contribution to football, not only in Scotland and in England, but across Europe and beyond. “His dedication, his attention to detail and his unique eye for talent, as both the manager of Manchester United FC and Aberdeen FC, has brought rich rewards over a 30-year period. His CV is almost unique in a results-based profession that normally focuses on short-term solutions rather than long-term vision. “He is a true visionary and I hope that, having helped us in the past through various coaching initiatives, he will continue to collaborate with UEFA to share his fantastic knowledge with the next generation of up-and-coming European coaches who all wish to emulate his achievements in the sport.” Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore said Ferguson’s “drive, ambition, skill, passion and vision” have forever altered the landscape of football, and he said: “The Premier League has had the privilege to witness many great players, managers and teams. No one has made as great a contribution to the Premier League than Sir Alex Ferguson. “His drive, ambition, skill, passion and vision have not only shaped Manchester United, but in many ways the game of football as we now know it. Sir Alex and his teams during the Premier League era have set the pace others have had to follow; 13 titles out of 21 seasons is a phenomenal achievement.” Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA) chief executive Gordon Taylor told Press Association Sport: “The game of football will be a lot poorer place without him. He has been quite simply the best. “He followed in Sir Matt Busby’s footsteps and even surpassed him. He will be also be the toughest act to follow.” FIFA president Sepp Blatter hailed Sir Alex Ferguson as one of football’s “greats” after the Manchester United manager announced he would retire at the end of the season.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Read more

Serbian footballer Aleksander Prijovic arrested for violating curfew

first_imgBelgrade: Serbian striker Aleksander Prijovic was arrested for violating the country’s coronavirus curfew. Serbia’s national police director Vladimir Rebic said that he and several other people were found drinking in a Belgrade hotel after the 5 p.m. deadline. “Prijovic was arrested along with several other people and they’ve been summoned to the prosecutor’s office,” Rebic told Serbia’s state-run RTS television broadcaster.”They violated the curfew as they were having drinks in the restaurant lobby of a Belgrade hotel after the 5 p.m. deadline and there were more than five people present in total.”Rebic said that the police also holds the hotel responsible as the “measures also prohibit serving food and drinks… except if home delivery is feasible.” IANSAlso Read: Assam Police arrested seven people for provocative content about COVID-19Also Watch: Sellers take advantage of helplessness of panic stricken citizens by overpricing commoditieslast_img read more

Read more

Allegations hurting USC image

first_imgIn light of the pending NCAA investigation into the USC football and basketball programs, the question on everyone’s mind has been, “How?”How could this have slipped through the cracks of one of the most prestigious athletic and academic universities in the country? And, if true, how could something that seems so overwhelmingly wrong have been allowed to occur?Long gone · Former men’s basketball coach Tim Floyd resigned from the team in June amid allegations that he gave cash to a confidant of O.J. Mayo’s. The public relations storm around the university has been fierce. – Nathaniel Gonzalez | Daily TrojanControversies such as those facing USC are a dime a dozen these days, as the media uncovers deeper information at increasingly lower levels and smaller institutions. Most recently, Michigan’s football program was accused of exceeding practice time limits. Last week, Memphis’s basketball program was forced to vacate all 38 of its wins from the 2007-08 season because of an SAT violation likely involving former guard Derrick Rose.The public relations impact from the accusation of violations — even if they are only accusations — are nightmarish for universities. In the Trojans’ case, doubt has entered the minds of those who hoped USC would be a pillar in these dark times for college athletics.The allegations levied against USC involving improper allowances and recruiting violations regarding former USC guard O.J. Mayo surfaced last year. The allegations against former running back Reggie Bush broke nearly three years ago.Despite the fact that no decision has come from the NCAA regarding alleged USC infractions, round-the-clock media coverage has hurt the reputation of the university.Michael L. Jackson, vice president for Student Affairs, knows all too well the impact of the claims and the deep-seated impact of the reports.“There are a couple of things we know — [these accusations are] not what the president wants, that’s not what the trustees want, that’s not what you or I want,” Jackson said in an interview this summer. “Some individuals do stupid things, and it definitely sullies the reputation of the university.”The public relations impact has been felt everywhere, from the highest university officials to the average student, whose own reputation sometimes rests upon that of the university they have chosen to attend.“I love the team so much, and I love the school so much, but at the same time, it’s disappointing to me that this kind of stuff happens, because it makes us look bad,” said David Johnson, a sophomore majoring in biomedical engineering.Many students who have seen the effects of the scandal wreak havoc on the credibility of the school remain conflicted about what they should be feeling.“You don’t want your school to look bad because your school is supposed to be a representation of you,” Johnson said.Daniel Weidlein, a sophomore majoring in jazz studies, also finds fault in the scandals, but wants to stay optimistic.“Whenever there is a scandal, I want to believe that the person is innocent,” Weidlein said. “I try to find other ways to rationalize it, like, ‘Oh, I’m sure every other school is doing it because USC is under such a spotlight.’”Weidlein also sees a visible decrease in not only his own interest in the basketball team, but in others’ interests as well.“I feel like I hardly want to go to basketball games this season,” Weidlein said. “Among people who care about sports, interest has definitely decreased.”In the future lies a conclusion to the story — a way to remedy the public opinion of the university — but when or where that will come, even Jackson does not know.“You wish these things could be brought to a conclusion and I think nobody wants to bring it more to a conclusion than we do,” Jackson said. “But life goes on, and you just know that that’s hanging out there. Look at these things, they just drag on forever,”James Grant, executive director of USC public relations, sees the light at the end of the tunnel.“We’re all just monitoring the situation and we’re hoping for a good and fair outcome,” Grant said.The place where the university hurts most as a result of such allegations is in the eyes of the public, and, for the time being, university public relations are somewhat powerless to combat any of the rumors or allegations that have arisen until they are satisfied with their own investigation.“These kinds of things are always fodder for talk radio and personal opinion; those things will happen, but we will wait until the process is concluded,” Grant said.He recognizes that it is hard for the university to effect a large change in public opinion when the facts have not all come out.“In our pledging to get to the bottom of it and clarify what happened when, that’s our attempt to assure everybody that we do care about these things, and expect everyone that works here to adhere to the standards that are set,” Grant said.It may be some time until Grant and Jackson can see the investigation all the way through and begin the healing process that will likely be needed to remedy the hit the university has taken in the court of public opinion.last_img read more

Read more

COLUMN: Obama’s departure is sad day for sports

first_imgYesterday was former President Barack Obama’s final day in office and — regardless of where you fall in the political spectrum — a sad day for sports fans across the country. Of the few presidencies I’ve lived through, no commander in chief has been as involved and as knowledgeable about the world of sports as Obama. Devout sports fans such as myself can tell almost immediately whether people in power — politicians, CEOs and celebrities — actually care about sports or are just trying to flub their way through a speech they didn’t write to cozy up to famous athletes (like San Francisco mayor Ed Lee calling Stephen Curry “Steve Curry” in 2013 when presenting the Golden State Warriors star a key to the city. That was cringe worthy).Through his eight years in office, I’ve watched Obama welcome championship teams and sports icons to the White House with casual jokes, references and remarks that make him feel more like a friend talking sports with you in a bar than the President of the United States making a speech. From making fun of Deflategate to calling Michael Jordan “more than just an internet meme,” Obama certainly has the sports jokes down. I’ve watched him fill out his bracket before the NCAA Tournament each year, explaining his picks and breaking down teams on ESPN, making more sense than some analysts the network somehow still employs (looking at you, Stephen A. Smith). In an interview with Grantland in 2012, Obama said he watches SportsCenter during his morning workouts, sneaks a peek at a ball game from time to time while reading briefings and even pays for NBA League Pass himself. GQ published an oral history this week describing Obama’s love of pickup basketball. He routinely played during both of his campaigns, including the day of both elections. It’s easy to say that all of this is pointless. Sports is unimportant in comparison to running a country. But can’t we all say that about our lives? Just because your team won a big game doesn’t mean you’ll get a promotion at work the next day. In this sense, Obama connected with us common folk who watch sports and use it as an escape from the stress of everyday life.There’s also something bigger about sports that Obama touched on beautifully on Monday, when he welcomed the World Series champions Chicago Cubs to the East Room for his final White House ceremony.“It is worth remembering — because sometimes people wonder, ‘Well, why are you spending time on sports? There’s other stuff going on’ — throughout our history, sports has had this power to bring us together, even when the country is divided,” he said. “Sports has changed attitudes and culture in ways that seem subtle but that ultimately made us think differently about ourselves and who we were. It is a game, and it is celebration, but there’s a direct line between Jackie Robinson and me standing here.”Robinson, of course, broke the color code in professional baseball, paving the way for the diverse world of sports we have now. In fact, black athletes make up the majority of players in both the NBA and NFL today, while minorities compose roughly 40 percent of MLB players. Sports are proof that no matter the political climate in the outside world, everyone on the playing field is one and the same, separated by their talents and abilities rather than race. It’s more than just the players: Anyone can be a sports fan. Go to a sporting event and you’ll see people across all walks of life cheering in unison for their team. “When you see this group of folks of different shades and different backgrounds coming from different communities and neighborhoods all across the country and then playing as one team and playing the right way and celebrating each other and being joyous in that, that tells us a little something about what America is and what America can be,” said Obama, describing Cubs players after their World Series victory. That is the true value of sports, which are so much more than simple objectives like putting a ball in a basket or running into an end zone. Obama understood that while Robinson was just a baseball player, he made it acceptable for people of color to participate in a league reserved for whites. That paved the way — more than half a century later — for a black man to lead the country, a position previously held solely by white men. And in the end, Obama was just as much a Chicago sports fan as he was the commander in chief. He cared about his March Madness brackets as much as the guy working a nine-to-five desk job, snuck in baseball games as much as the college student “multitasking” while studying, watched SportsCenter at the gym just like you or I would and shot hoops with his friends like any other dude. Say what you want about his politics or the legacy he leaves behind. But I’ll simply say this, from one sports fan to another: Thanks, Obama, for reminding us of what sports are all about and how they can make a tremendous impact on progress in society.Eric He is a sophomore studying print and digital journalism. He is also the associate managing editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Grinding Gears,” runs on Fridays.last_img read more

Read more

What to know about the constantly changing status of Syracuse fall sports

first_imgHere’s what you need to know about SU’s COVID-19 response strategy SU Greek life during COVID-19: No parties, social events at chapter houses The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.After the NCAA canceled spring championships on March 12, universities across the country embarked on a long path toward fall sports. Conferences had nearly six months to unify, develop concrete plans and ensure safe participation in football and other Olympic sports.As the Atlantic Coast Conference’s revised fall schedule nears, with seasons set to open the week of Sept. 7, numerous uncertainties still exist. Any uniformity and overarching NCAA power has evaporated as individual conferences prepare to take their own routes toward the fall season.Two Power 5 conferences — the Big Ten and Pac-12 — have already canceled seasons. Football Championship Subdivision teams scratched fall competitions altogether. Others, such as the ACC and SEC, have kept anticipated start dates.“‘Here’s the path to play in the fall,’” Director of Athletics John Wildhack said on July 30. “That trumped everything else … So we just want to get the chance to play.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse finds itself balancing hope for college football with the reality that the NCAA canceled championships for six of its fall sports on Thursday. “It’s been quite an adventure,” Wildhack said, but it’s one that could ultimately end with the cancellation of Olympic sports seasons while football marches ahead.Here’s what you need to know about the path to fall Olympic sports, as schedules, although many are unknown, begin in two weeks.The shutdownWhen the Orange strolled off the Greensboro Coliseum’s court following an 81-53 victory over North Carolina in the ACC men’s basketball tournament, it was the final game for a Syracuse team for five months. It was March 11, and the Orange’s quarterfinal against Louisville in less than 24 hours was uncertain. So were the NCAA and NIT postseason tournaments that following week.The next day, conferences started canceling their respective tournaments and spring programs postponed their seasons. March Madness went from limited fans to fan-less to canceled outright, and spring teams began cleaning out their lockers after partway through the season.For men’s lacrosse, that meant abandoning an undefeated start and No. 1 ranking. For softball, that meant not even playing a home game. If fall sports were postponed until the spring, NCAA president Mark Emmert said Thursday night, winter and spring sports would be the primary concern because their championships were canceled last season.The delayEven before the ACC released its modified football schedule on July 29, fall Olympic sports had already been altered. Three weeks earlier, the conference delayed Olympic sports games and competitions until Sept. 1, which impacted volleyball, men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s cross country and field hockey.While schedules for those teams hadn’t been released yet, Syracuse had 14 games or exhibitions in August last year. Under the new ACC scheduling guidelines, those Olympic programs were limited to playing the minimum number of conference games mandated by the NCAA. For volleyball, that’s 10 matches. For soccer and field hockey, it’s just six games.Schools can add other conference and nonconference opponents to their schedule as long as those schools’ medical guidelines and protocols align with the ACC’s, though those games won’t count toward ACC standings. Budgets for Olympic sports will likely be trimmed at all universities — at least for this season, if not longer.Those six SU teams joined football in a gradual return to campus for voluntary offseason workouts starting in early June. As of July 30, all but cross country had returned to campus in some capacity, Wildhack said. Individual schools put together plans to bring back athletes for voluntary offseason workouts.Upon returning to Syracuse, players were immediately tested and isolated until a negative COVID-19 test result returned. Masks were required in workout spaces, as was social distancing, and SU has been able to continue its workouts throughout the summer.Protocols for football focused on ensuring training camp could begin on Aug. 6 and ultimately a full season could begin in mid-September while providing Syracuse the necessary amount of time for season preparations. But for Olympic sports, their seasons won’t look anywhere near their normal length — if they happen at all.Where from here?Over the next few weeks, several votes will take place that affect the fall sports seasons for Syracuse. By Aug. 21, the NCAA board of directors is expected to approve eligibility protections for fall athletes who had their seasons cut short or canceled altogether. It’s a similar step to what the NCAA took in March when it granted spring athletes an extra year of eligibility.With that protection, more fall athletes will likely opt-out, especially Olympic sports players with drastically reduced seasons. So far, Syracuse defensive lineman Cooper Dawson is the only SU player to opt out of the 2020 season, but football head coach Dino Babers has said that more are “pending.”The ACC could still vote to cancel fall sports all together, although that seems unlikely according to national reports.“I’m particularly pleased for our student-athletes who have a clear path toward competing this fall,” Wildhack said in a statement after the ACC announced its updated football schedule. “It is incumbent upon all of us in the Syracuse Athletics Department to strictly adhere to the protocols we and the ACC have in place.” MORE FROM ORIENTATION GUIDE 2020: Storylines to follow as Syracuse football gears up for an unusual season In a season without the Carrier Dome, SU student runs Otto’s Army virtually Comments Published on August 17, 2020 at 1:13 am Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read more

Enyimba, Rivers United in Goalless Thriller in Calabar

first_imgNigeria Professional Football League (NPFL) heavyweights, Enyimba and Rivers United on Tuesday played out an entertaining 0-0 draw in a high-profile pre-season friendly match in Calabar.United started on the front foot at the UJ Esuene Stadium and should have opened the scoring in the third minute but Emeka Ogbugh failed to reach Bolaji Sakin’s cross on the far side.Emeka Atoloma also had a clear sight of goal but failed to score in the 19th minute following impressive work by Nzube Anaezemba and Lukman Mohammed who combind delightfully to carve open the Enyimba defence. ‘The Pride of Rivers’ were the dominant side in the first half and were extremely unfortunate not to finally get off the mark in the 35th minute when Anaezemba missed an open goal with a right-footed drive which flew marginally wide.The visitors continued to enjoy the better of the goal scoring opportunities in a frenetic half with Ogbugh fluffing his lines twice within a minute as the first period came to an end.Enyimba also had their moments too, most notably in the 36th minute when Joseph Osadiaye’s fierce long range drive failed to trouble Sunday Rotimi in the United goal.If the first half belonged to United, the second was pretty much all about the People’s Elephants as they pinned the Port Harcourt side to their half for most parts.Osadiaye, Ifegwu Ojukwu, Stephen Chukwude, Ikechukwu Ibenegbu and Mfon Udoh all came close to scoring for the two-time African champions in a second half that ebbed and flowed.Ibrahim Mustapha missed the best chance of the game, four minutes after the restart as he managed to plant a free header wide from two yards after he was played in by captain, Udoh on the right.It was a good workout for both sides with just days to the start of the 2016/17 NPFL season and the Enyimba trainer, Gbenga Ogunbote voiced his sentiments to the Rivers United official website, www.riversunitedfc.com.ng after the game.“I am still not completely satisfied (with the state of my team) but it is still a team in the making.“We should have scored some goals in the game and we need to work on correcting those mistakes.“Even if we had won (against Rivers United), we still would have had a few things that we need to perfect,” he said.The United technical manager, Stanley Eguma also spoke to the media afterwards.“It was a good game and Enyimba played well.“We had scoring chances but failed to convert them and that is something that we really need to work on.“All the same, that is why these sort of matches are played; to help us identify and correct mistakes,” he said.Rivers United and Enyimba will both open their respective league campaigns with tricky home fixtures on Sunday.Enyimba will face Sunshine Stars while United welcome El Kanemi Warriors to the Yakubu Gowon Stadium, Port Harcourt.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Read more