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first_imgForward Jones displays his new Club jersey after officially signing a three-year professional development contractImage: JLSFC-Liberia.Following four months of negotiations, Junior Lone Star FC-Liberia (JLSFC-Liberia) has announced the signing of forward Willie Jones from Samira FC. According to a release from JLSFC-Liberia, the 19-year-old over the weekend signed a three-year professional contract with the team.The deal means the forward will remain at the club until 2021. The transfer was approved by the Central Monrovia Sub-Committee and the Liberia Football Association.“I am so excited to have joined Junior Lone Star FC-Liberia. I had some wonderful years at Samira FC, and I just want to thank the Board, coaches, and the teammates during my time there. The chance to play for Junior Lone Star FC-Liberia, and work with coach Solomon Freeman was something I could not turn down, because it has always been my dream to play for the club in the USA. I can’t wait to start my journey with the Stars here, and show our fans around the world why this club fought tooth and nail to sign me,” the release quotes forward Jones.He also lauded several individuals, including  Konah Mitchell, Notel Jolo, Kara Smith, Milton Suah, Arnold Kennedy, Ansu Dolley, M’bemba Kawah, Mohammed Sheriff and others who have been instrumental in his football career. “I can’t wait to make you all proud,” he added.Commenting on the signing of the forward, head coach Solomon Freeman said forward Jones will be a great asset to the team as they enter the new LFA third division league season. “Jones is one of the best young strikers in Liberia, and I strongly believe that he will be a great asset to our young and talented squad,” he said. Jones is expected to feature for the club in their opening match against Brewerville United today at the A.T.S.The club founder Bobby Ali said, “we have been following Jones for the past three years due to his exploits with Grand Bassa County in the County Meet as well as in the third division league with his former club, and he’s someone the coach wants to build the team. We are happy he’s now a JLSFC-Liberia player, and we hope his drive and ambition will make the team stronger.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgWorld Record to be Attempted at the 2009 Fort St. John International Air ShowThe Fort St. John International Air Show Society in partnership with the City of Fort St. John will be hosting the Fort St. John International Air Show this summer on Sunday, July 19, 2009.  – Advertisement -The Committee is excited to announce a set of new performers to this year’s already full line-up of performers, Jurassic Attack and Maniac.  These monster trucks are huge 4×4’s that destroy everything in their way. The machines weigh about 10,000 pounds, are 12 feet high, 12 feet wide and have motors that close in on 2,000 horse power.  Maniac is coming to the 2009 Fort St. John International Air Show to attempt a new World Record, for the world’s longest wheelie.  “This is an exciting new set of performers for the Air Show this year” Said Darlene Hamre, Show Producer, “Not only are two monster trucks coming to perform, but they will attempt a World Record which is very exciting, especially if they accomplish what they came here to do.”Jurassic Attack and Maniac are no strangers to Air Shows.  During their previous tours of Canada and the U.S., they have stopped at many air shows including the Lethbridge International Air Show where they say the pilots had just as much fun in the monster truck cockpits as they did in the planes. Tickets are on sale at Petron Communications, Quality Inn Northern Grand, Fort St. John’s Visitor Centre and online at www.fsjairshow.com.  You can also see the show for free if you volunteer to help with the show.  To apply as a volunteer, please visit www.fsjairshow.com to sign up online or call (250) 787-7100.  Free shuttle busses will help move people from the North Peace Arena to the Airport starting at 11am on Sunday July 19th.  Parking will cost $15 at the airport with proceeds going to North Peace Search and Rescue.Advertisement With 2009 marking the 100th Anniversary of Powered Flight in Canada, we are expecting the F-86 Sabre “Hawk One” which has been restored and painted to mark this great achievement plus great acts like the Canadian Forces Snowbirds, the Skyhawks and much more!  The last Air Show in Fort St. John was held in July of 2007 and over 8,000 people attended the evening show and thousands of dollars was donated to local charities and non-profit societies in the North Peace.  Keep track of the 2009 Fort St. John Air Show by visiting fsjairshow.comlast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Neil Armstrong’s words as he first stepped onto the surface of the moon — “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” — are some of the most memorable in history.But seven months earlier, the astronauts aboard NASA’s first manned mission to orbit the moon, Apollo 8, were at a loss for words.RELATED: 5 faith facts about the moon landing: Space Communion and a prayer league of its ownIn December 1968, James Lovell, Frank Borman and Bill Anders prepared to become the first humans to journey beyond Earth’s orbit, circling around the dark side of the moon. Just about everyone on the planet would be listening.What could they possibly say as they watched that pale blue dot rise over the moon’s horizon on Christmas Eve?“We wanted to do something significant, not so much religious as to give them sort of a shock in the psychological solar plexus, to help them remember Apollo 8 and humankind’s first venture from the earth,” Anders later told PBS.Before their mission, the astronauts had contacted a government public affairs specialist named Joseph Laitin for his advice, according to a 2018 Boston Globe report.It was Laitin’s wife, Christine, who reportedly suggested the trio read the creation account from Genesis 1, the foundation of a number of world religions.The passage begins with the words, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”Borman read last, ending the transmission with a holiday greeting.“And from the crew of Apollo 8, we close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas and God bless all of you — all of you on the good Earth,” he said.Atheist activist Madalyn Murray O’Hair later sued the U.S. government, alleging the Genesis reading was a violation of the separation of church and state. Her case was ultimately dismissed.But the crew members of Apollo 8 weren’t the last space travelers to bring religion with them into orbit. From NASA’s Apollo missions to SpaceIL’s recent moonshot, and from Christmas to Ramadan, humans have found ways to practice their beliefs while touching the heavens.This interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows Astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, Jr., during the lunar landing mission in July 1969. Photo by Neil A. Armstrong/NASA/Creative CommonsNot long after that Christmas Eve, astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became the first person to celebrate the Christian rite of Communion in space in the moments before he and Armstrong touched down on the surface of the moon 50 years ago this Saturday (July 20).Several others have since. Three Catholic astronauts received Communion aboard the space shuttle Endeavour in 1994, astronaut Tom Jones recalled in his memoir. So did astronaut Mike Hopkins aboard the International Space Station in 2013, according to Catholic News Service.“When you see the Earth from that vantage point and see all the natural beauty that exists, it’s hard not to sit there and realize there has to be a higher power that has made this,” Hopkins told Catholic News Service.RELATED: Bishops and astronauts gather in Washington to remember Apollo 8Religious rituals in space aren’t confined to Christianity, either.The first Israeli astronaut, Ilan Ramon, had written the Kiddush, the Jewish blessing for wine, into his diary so he could offer it aboard the space shuttle Columbia “during his space Sabbath which he read over the radio to Earth,” according to Wired.A page from the diary of Ilan Ramon with the Friday night Kiddush blessing. Photo courtesy of The Israel MuseumRamon, whose father had fled Nazi Germany and whose mother had survived the concentration camp at Auschwitz, was killed when Columbia disintegrated upon reentry in 2003, minutes before it was expected to land at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Only about 40% of the space shuttle and its contents has ever been recovered.Ramon’s is the only diary that was found, wet and crumpled in a field outside Palestine, Texas. Scientists and scholars spent four years restoring its pages before it was displayed in 2008 at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem — his handwritten Kiddush clearly readable on its pages.His wife, Rona, told Wired it was “a small miracle that needs to be shared.”Ramon also had carried a drawing of the Earth from the perspective of the moon by a Jewish boy killed at Auschwitz and a small Torah that had been smuggled into the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.RELATED: Tiny Torah travels from hell on earth into outer spaceThe first known Ramadan prayers offered from orbit came from Malaysia’s first astronaut, Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor, aboard the International Space Station in 2007.Shukor, an orthopedic surgeon selected as a crew member on the station’s 16th mission, would be in space during the tail end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Though the Muslim Shukor was intent on observing the associated rituals, fasting and praying while in space wasn’t a straightforward endeavor.The ISS orbits the Earth at around 17,500 mph (making it difficult to pray in the direction of Mecca, especially while floating in microgravity) and completes one revolution roughly every 90 minutes, meaning the sun rises and sets far more frequently than for stationary humans below. This makes it unclear when to break one’s daily Ramadan fast, which begins at sunrise and ends at nightfall.To address these concerns, Malaysia’s space agency convened 150 Islamic scientists and scholars, who ultimately produced a document outlining instructions for observing various rituals while in orbit, usually by establishing a list of preferred options “based on what is possible.”For example, the authors concluded that if it is too difficult to pray toward the Kaaba, the building at the center of the Great Mosque of Mecca, it would be permissible to simply pray toward Earth.The document was ultimately approved by Malaysia’s National Fatwa Council, and Shukor brought into space Malaysian satay — skewers of spicy meat — and cookies to give to others aboard the space station to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, the end of Ramadan.RELATED: The jubilee of the moon landing is a chance to assess technology’s promise (COMMENTARY)Beyond the rituals of the major faiths, tokens of religious devotion also have been part of many space flights.St. Seraphim of Sarov, one of the Russian Orthodox Church’s most revered saints, was an 18th-century monk known for his hermetic lifestyle, visions of the Virgin Mary and reported ability to perform miraculous healings.He’s also known for his 2017 spaceflight.The International Space Station as viewed from the Space Shuttle Atlantis on May 23, 2010. Photo by NASA/Creative CommonsRussian cosmonaut Sergei Ryzhikov carried a relic of the saint with him — a gift from a monastery — to the International Space Station, according to The Associated Press.“We always wait for some sort of miracle, but the fact that a piece of the relics traveled to the orbit and blesses everything onboard and outside, including our planet, is a big miracle in itself,” Ryzhikov told The Associated Press.Russian space travelers have taken relics of at least six Orthodox saints and a piece of the Holy Cross with them, according to The Associated Press. Roman Catholic astronauts have carried with them crucifixes, prayer cards, icons and religious items and other mementos from schools, parishes and friends, according to Catholic News Service reports.RELATED: For Israeli lunar lander, faith provides inspiration and challengesEarlier this year, an Israeli moonshot went back to the beginning.When the Israeli group SpaceIL began working with American aerospace company SpaceX to plan the launch of SpaceIL’s scrappy unmanned lunar lander, they quickly ran into an unexpected religious problem. SpaceIL planned on hitching a ride on a SpaceX rocket to get the project into space, but the U.S. company normally launches its rockets on Saturdays — traditionally a day of rest and religious observance for many on SpaceIL’s staff, some of whom are Orthodox Jews.A selfie taken by the Beresheet moon lander spacecraft while roughly 23,350 miles from Earth. Image courtesy of SpaceILSpaceIL and SpaceX eventually agreed to a Thursday launch, and the Israeli group’s Beresheet lander — whose name is a reference to the Hebrew word for “in the beginning” in Genesis — took its trip to the moon, carrying, in addition to scientific instruments, a massive digital library that included religious texts. The lander also toted along a separate virtual time capsule loaded with Israeli symbols, a Bible and a copy of the Jewish Wayfarer’s Prayer.Though the Space IL lander crashed into the lunar surface due to an engine glitch, the group has signed a partnership to share its technology with another U.S. company, Firefly Aerospace, which will embark on its own moonshot.The name for Firefly’s lander?Genesis. Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Israeli archaeologists discover signs of religion in 9,000-year-old city near Jerusale … Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Anti-extremism program won’t stop hate, say Muslims who’ve seen its flaws August 30, 2019 Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Scribes tried to blot her out. Now a scholar is trying to recover the real Mary Magdal … Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Opinion By their tweets you will know them: The Democrats’ continuing God gap August 30, 2019 Share This!center_img Tags5 faith facts Apollo 11 Apollo 8 Beresheet Christmas Five Faith Facts homepage featured Ilan Ramon International Space Station moon landing NASA Ramadan Sabbath Sergei Ryzhikov Shabbat space space shuttle Columbia Top Story,You may also like Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity. Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Share This! We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 News About the authorView All Posts By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Jack Jenkins Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Share This! By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

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