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first_img Mirko Pigliacelli 1 Premier League new boys Watford are eyeing promising Italian goalkeeper Mirko Pigliacelli.The 21-year-old currently plays for Serie B side Frosinone but has been attracting attention from other clubs after a fine season between the sticks.According to reports in Italy, Watford are one of the sides who have been keeping close tabs on him all year and could be about to make their move for him, having won promotion to the top flight.However, they will face competition from AEK Athens for his signature when the transfer window opens.last_img

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first_imgMembers of a local community action group has met with Donegal County Council and Traffic Infrastructure Ireland to discuss ongoing speeding issues at a local school.Parents and staff at Illistrin National School outside Letterkenny are concerned over speeding motorists outside the school.A recent meeting of parents and local public representatives heard concerns that it is only a matter of time that a serious accident takes place unless action is taken. Suggestions of a periodic speed limit being introduced outside the school received a general welcome.Members of the Illistrin Action group, including teachers and parents, yesterday met with the council and the TII to observe issues of concern.The groups spent up to an hour on site observing the ‘on the ground’ issues facing children and their parents at the school.The groups then gathered at the local council offices where they met with Councillors Ciaran Brogan, Gerry McMonagle and Michael McBride to discuss the issues. Cllr Brogan told Donegal Daily that he was pleased to be able to see the issues facing the school, children and parents as they were happening “on the ground.”He said he was hopeful that ‘periodic speed limit’ signs could be set up at the school in the New Year.And he said he hoped the role-out of the periodic speed limit at Illistrin school could become a model for other schools who did such measures across the county.“I think it is very important that parents and teachers see that the various bodies are on the ground and are taking this matter seriously.“I think the situation at Illistrin can serve as a role model for schools across the county in similar situations,” said councillor Brogan. Ilistrin Action group meets with council and TII over speeding issues was last modified: November 22nd, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgFollowing an internal investigation, figures show that over a five year period almost one million Garda breath tests recorded on the Pulse system did not happen.Over five years, 1,200 devices were in use across 108 Garda Districts with no central recording process.Nationwide between November 2011 and October 2016 , the MBRS recorded 1,058,157 breath tests – almost half of the alleged 1,996,365 breath tests that were lodged on the Pulse system. The breath test controversy was brought to light after The Irish Times published an article earlier this year outlining how the Medical Bureau of Road Safety (MBRS) noted that the number of tests being recorded on Pulse did not correlate with the amount of disposable mouth pieces being ordered.The discrepancies were so large in Cork and Kerry Garda stations, that a nationwide investigation was launched.“Some officers provided guestimates”An internal Garda investigation has been launched to investigate the inaccuracies, with assistant Garda commissioner Michael Sullivan expected to publish a report including recommendations for improvement next month. The Sunday Times report that the investigation involved interviewing Gardaí across the country in an attempt to determine why breath tests had inflated by 88% between November 2011 and October 2016.Made-up figures and mistakes made during administration and data input were blamed for the major discrepancies.A source with knowledge of the inquiry told journalist John Mooney that there are a number of reasons to explain how certain divisions appear to have “exaggerated their results”.“Some officers provided guestimates, some made up statistics while others provided information on how many cars they stopped as opposed to the number of drivers they breathalysed.”“A matter of grave disappointment”Speaking following the discovery of the major discrepancy, Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan said that the findings were a “grave disappointment” and says corrective action is to follow. She also promised to be completely open about the matter with the public, in order to “sustain public trust.”“What we’ve found thus far is totally unacceptable and not in keeping with the standards of a modern and professional police service,” she said. “The Policing Authority and Garda management are ad idem that this is a matter of individual and collective ethical behaviour and not one of occasional systems failure.“It is a matter of grave disappointment that this has apparently been happening for so long, unchallenged.“Every single member of the organisation must recognise that their individual actions, in all areas of policing, reflects on the organisation as a whole and impacts on the trust between ourselves and the communities we serve.“However, as evidenced this week, I am determined that where we identify problems in the organisation, we admit these issues publicly, take whatever corrective action is necessary and ensure they do not recur. That is what I expect of the organisation and what is demanded of us by the community. “In addition to correcting these issues, we must share that information, no matter how negative it is, not just with the Authority, but also with the public. Only through that openness can we sustain public trust,” concluded the Garda Commissioner.Gardaí also say that data recorded on Pulse for 2016 is accurate based on the data available to AGS from the Medical Bureau for Road Safety.Report shows that Gardaí “guestimated” one million breath test statistics was last modified: August 15th, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:breath testbreathalyserGardaiinvestigationnoirin o sullivanlast_img read more

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first_imgAn Indian-origin man was sentenced to 11 years and two months in jail for being part of a “prolific” dark web drug dealing group, according to the UK National Crime Agency (NCA). In total, five members of the group have been sentenced to a total of 56 years.London residents Basil Assaf, Elliot Hyams, Jaikishen Patel, all 26, and James Roden, 25 were students at the Manchester University when they began selling drugs on the notorious Silk Road website. Junior member Joshua Morgan, 28, of Manchester, was paid to package drugs for the group.The group was led by Assaf, who received 15 years and three months sentence. They moved the drug dealing operation on to Silk Road, a website modeled on sites such as eBay and Amazon, to sell a variety of illicit goods, in May 2011. Soon, they became one of the most successful businesses on Silk Road, which is part of the dark web.Under the brand name Ivory, they sent drugs, including LSD, ecstasy, 2CB, ketamine, and valium, to buyers around the world. The five people sent almost 17 kg of liquid ecstasy, equivalent to 240,000 tablets, through the post to buyers, in 6,305 sales.They also sent more than 1.2 kg of 2CB and more than 1.4 kg of ketamine.According to the NCA’s investigation, the group made at least $1.14 million (about £812,000), but the actual amount is unknown since they took cash or cryptocurrencies whenever possible.With their drug sales, the group funded a luxurious lifestyle for themselves, including holidays in the Bahamas and Jamaica, and weekends partying with suppliers in Amsterdam. Meanwhile, they also had instances of infighting when Hyams was sacked over his unreliability so he made off with a large quantity of drugs as compensation.Assaf then threatened Hyams, saying, “I won’t hesitate to ruin your life. Your mother will find out the truth.” He also followed through with the threat.The group came under the radar when the FBI shut down the Silk Road and seized its servers in October 2013. They shared the information with the NCA, which shortly arrested Assaf and Roden.The officers found four sets of scales, heat sealing devices, envelopes and jiffy bags, label printers, £4,500 in cash and more than 11,000 individual doses of LSD. Hyams was arrested the same day while officers arrested Patel, who worked with Assaf and Roden throughout, a year later.“These five men were interested only in making money,” Ian Glover, senior operations manager at the NCA, said. “They had no regard whatsoever for the harm these drugs could do to their users. The FBI’s excellent work shut the site down in 2013 in a globally significant operation and information they shared with us enabled us to identify, arrest and successfully build this case.” Related ItemsBritish Indiandrug crimemanchesterlast_img read more

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