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first_imgLudlow Watts, manager of Jamaica’s team to the IAAF World Championships in Athletics, defended the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association’s (JAAA) selection of Rasheed Dwyer to the team, while explaining the exclusion of quarter-miler Ricardo Chambers.Watts explained that Dwyer, who finished fifth in the 200m final at the JAAA/Supreme Venture Limited National Senior Championships and out of the automatic qualifying spots for his pet event, was added as a member of the 4x100m pool as a replacement for Andrew Fisher, who effectively gave up his spot after defecting to Bahrain.Chambers, who had battled his way back from years of injuries and setbacks, crossed the line in third place in the men’s 400m final at the JAAA/Supreme Ventures National Senior Championships, which serves as the primary selection method for the World Championships.The athlete celebrated what seemed an automatic spot in the individual 400m, with the JAAA selection policy making provision for the top-three finishers with IAAF qualifying standards as representatives in individual events.However, Chambers was later disqualified for a lane violation, promoting Peter Matthews to the third and final automatic individual spot, with Edino Steele, Jonia McDonald and Dane Hyatt also promoted to the fourth – sixth positions.All three were, as a result, named as members of the 4x400m relay pool, with Chambers – who posted the third fastest time by a Jamaican this year (44.93) at the NACAC Championships recently – and a number of observers expressing surprise at his exclusion from the squad.Vacancy filled”In the case of (Rasheed) Dwyer, there was a clear vacancy because we had six places for the (4x100m) relay pool, but ended up with only five athletes because one person who had qualified in the top six at trials, (Andrew) Fisher, is looking to represent another country, so that left us with five athletes and a clear vacancy in the 4x100m,” Watts told Gleaner Athletics. “Based on the entry, you could not have gotten anyone else on the team unless it was someone for the relay pool.”He added: “In the case of (Ricardo) Chambers, there was no scope for him to get in because they already selected six athletes for the 4x400m pool, so he could only have been named to the squad if someone withdrew,” Watts explained.The JAAA selection policy states:”Athletes placing in the first four positions in the 100m and 400m will be named to the relay pool. The remaining members of the relay pool will be selected by the JAAA Selection Committee.”As mandated by the IAAF, athletes who are selected to run individual 100m/400m are automatic members of the relay pool.”Dwyer, who is coached by technical leader Maurice Wilson, also has wildcard considerations, having won the 200m at the just-concluded Area championships, the NACAC Open Champs in San JosÈ, Costa Rica.last_img read more

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first_imgIT WAS once part of life here in County Donegal, but it seems the humble pub is being hammered – with an incredible 41 fewer pubs in the county than three years ago.The shock figures were released by the Vintners Federation of Ireland (VFI), which said pubs in rural areas are being hit particularly hard by a combination of factors.VFI president Gerry Mellett claims below-cost selling by supermarkets, stricter drink-driving laws and the smoking ban has led to a major decline in trade. “The removal of restrictions on below-cost selling has really broken the back of the industry because they’re selling at prices that we can never compete with,” Mr Mellett said.“When you combine this with stricter drink-driving regulations and the smoking ban, we’re making it increasingly difficult for people to socialise. The authorities seem intent on over-regulating everything,”There were a total of 7,616 pub licences in 2010 in Ireland, according to the Revenue Commissioners, down from 8,922 in 2005.Opposition parties claim support for rural transport schemes for customers in isolated areas. “It is no exaggeration to say the closure of rural pubs in particular is having a devastating effect on the fabric of life in rural Ireland,” said Mr Mellett.“In many areas the pub functions as an important community focal point, and provides a great social hub for many people.“Pub closures have inhibited social lives, and have disrupted the community spirit and life of many neighbourhoods.”The federation said it was important that local businesses such as pubs, hotels and the farming community were supported and that better services were put in place in the regions to attract investment, create jobs and encourage people to live and spend locally.“Action needs to be taken immediately to prevent more rural pub closures to stave off rural isolation,” the VFI said in a statement. LAST ORDERS CALLED ON 41 DONEGAL PUBS IN JUST THREE YEARS was last modified: January 3rd, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgAs a child in Raleigh, N.C., Priti Chitnis Gress yearned for the all-American burgers and pizzas instead of the traditional food being cooked in her home. She recalls, “My parents preferred very spicy, or ‘hot’ Indian dishes and they didn’t make exceptions for the children. My mother would sprinkle sugar over dal and rice in an attempt to get me to eat it, but it hardly worked.”  Today Gress, who is an editor, is an accomplished home cook and the author of Flavorful India: Treasured Recipes from a Gujarati Family (Hippocrene Books) – a tribute to her mother Suvashini’s Gujarati cooking.The Chitins family often entertained American friends and neighbors with home cooked food and Gress recalls, “Often dressed in a sari, my mother attracted attention from Americans at work or at church, and she introduced many native Southerners to Gujarati cooking. Her friends loved coming over to watch her cook and even better, enjoy a meal with us afterwards. For guests, she would often prepare chicken curry, rice, rotlis (chappati), and a great variety of vegetables. Southerners love fried okra, for example, and they raved about my mom’s bhinda.The book is a glimpse of Gujarati home cooking, something most Indian restaurants don’t serve and few Americans know anything about. “Gujarat cuisine offers so many delicious vegetarian options, and readers should know there is much more to Indian cooking than naan and tandoori chicken,” she says. One normally assumes Gujarati cooking to be all vegetarian, but in her book she also celebrates the non-vegetarian cooking of the Muslim and Christian Gujarati communities.Gress, who lives with husband Jay in Hoboken, NJ, definitely doesn’t cook a full Indian dinner very night, but a couple of times a week: “My cooking is a little different than my mom’s as I’ve been influenced by several years of New York City’s Indian take-out offerings. I tend to like dishes a little richer and creamier.” She believes that even novices can cook the dishes and shows how easy it is to shop for ingredients and cook Gujarati food in the US, even with work pressures: “I wanted to find that balance between slaving in the kitchen over a good meal and spending time enjoying it with my family.” Coconut-Cashew-Raisin Potato PattiesMakes 15 to 20 pattiesHere is another variation of these patties. Serve them with Tamarind Chutney(adding in dates)   · 4 medium-size potatoes, boiled, peeled and mashed       1 teaspoon sesame seeds       2 cups all-purpose flour        1 teaspoon sugar   · 1 tablespoon powdered coconut    · 6 to 9 cashew nuts, finely ground   · 1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated ginger    · 10 to 12 raisins, finely chopped   · 1/2 teaspoon finely minced green chili pepper    · 1 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro       1 teaspoon garam masala         1/2 cup oilDivide the mashed potatoes into 2 equal portions. Combine the first portion with 1 cup of the flour. Combine the second portion with the coconut, ginger,green chilli, garam masala, sesame seeds, sugar cashews, raisins, cilantro andlemon juice. Mix thoroughly.With the potato-flour mixture, make fifteen to twenty small balls. Flatten each ball with your hand or a rolling pin to make a patty. Place 1 tablespoon of the other potato mixture on each patty. Pull the edges of the patty around the“stuffing” to form a 1-to 2- inch ball. Oil your hands and flatten each ball into a2- to 3-inch patty with your palm.Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Coat each patty with the remainingFlour, shake off the excess, and pan-fry for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, or untilgolden brown.Tamarind ChutneyMakes 1/4 to 1/2 cup of chutneyTamarind Chutney is generally sweet but can be made spicier with the addition of more red pepper or minced green chili. Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for one to two weeks.· 2 tablespoons tamarind paste * 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper * 1/4 teaspoon salt · 1 teaspoon brown sugar Optional ingredients:1 tablespoon finely chopped golden raisins1 date, finely chopped1/2 to 1 green chili, stemmed and minced2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantroCombine all the ingredients, including any desired optional ingredients with 1tablespoon water. Mix well. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons additional water for a more liquid chutney. Related Itemslast_img read more

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