ESG roundup: UK schemes challenged on climate risk action

first_imgA spokesman for ShareAction said at least 24 schemes had been contacted through the campaign, including public and corporate schemes, and both defined benefit and defined contribution funds.The oil and gas companies will this year hold three-year binding votes on pay policy.The letters argued that the pay policies Shell and BP were proposing did not incentivise business activity compatible with keeping global warming to less than 2°C, which could put shareholder value at risk in the long term.LGPS funds urged to up the ante on investment climate risk Separately, ClientEarth and ShareAction have analysed newly published ‘investment strategy statements’ (ISS) from local government pension scheme (LGPS) funds, and found that more than 80% did not mention climate risk.The analysis came after the organisations contacted The Pensions Regulator in February highlighting varying standards across the LGPS funds in terms of how they were assessing and managing climate risk in their decision-making. The two organisations argued that funds must address climate risk specifically in their investment strategies as climate change posed systemic risks likely to affect a fund’s whole portfolio. They said they would continue to monitor “laggard funds” and might take further regulatory action. Catherine Howarth, CEO of ShareAction, said many LGPS funds were “operating under a number of misconceptions, including legal ones”.“This is not fair on pension holders,” she said. “Members’ savings should be protected across the board from the very real and emergent risks of climate change.”Don’t relax on climate change action, investors urge leadersMore than 200 global institutional investors have called on the heads of state of major world economies to drive investment in low carbon assets and implement climate-related financial reporting frameworks.Overarching these demands was a call for the G7 and G20 leaders to stick with and swiftly implement their commitments to the Paris Agreement on climate change.G20 leaders failed to reference climate change, climate finance, and climate adaptation in an official statement following a meeting of these countries’ finance ministers in March this year. Pressure from the US was reportedly behind the omission of a stated commitment to climate action.In this week’s letter to G7 and G20 government leaders, investors urged global leaders to commit to supporting a doubling of global investment in low carbon assets in developed and developing countries by 2020 and to include carbon pricing in climate-energy action plans.On climate-related financial reporting frameworks, the investors called on political leaders to “clarify the purview of national financial regulators to explicitly mandate, enforce, and evaluate” the quality of climate-related financial disclosures in alignment with the recommendations from the Financial Stability Board (FSB) Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD).More specifically, national financial regulators should develop mechanisms to monitor whether company and investor disclosures, and national reporting rules, are aligned with the task force’s recommendations. National regulators should provide annual progress reports to the FSB, according to the investors.The letter was coordinated by several investor organisations, including the Institutional Investor Group on Climate Change (IIGCC) and the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI).Actiam cuts back on coal investmentsElsewhere, the €55bn Dutch asset manager Actiam has said it would divest from companies with a turnover of more than 15% derived from coal production.As a consequence, the manager – a subsidiary of Vivat/Anbang – said it would sell its holdings in 10 emerging market firms, adding that it would publish the companies’ names at a later stage.It said that its entire investment portfolio, including its index products, were subject to the exclusion decision.Actiam’s pension fund clients include the €20bn Vervoer, the sector scheme for private road transport in the Netherlands. UK pension savers have written to schemes such as The Pensions Trust and the Universities Superannuation Scheme urging them to engage with asset managers about voting against the remuneration policies of Royal Dutch Shell and BP.The letters were addressed to trustees and other relevant decision-makers and outline potential liability if they don’t take action.The letter writing campaign was supported by responsible investment campaign organisation ShareAction and environmental law charity ClientEarth.ClientEarth CEO James Thornton said: “ClientEarth is supporting these members to make full use of the law to protect their rights. We’ll be watching how pension funds vote on these remuneration policies, and will be ready to take action where necessary.”last_img read more

Read more

Tracy’s Karate holds 104th tournament

first_imgBUCKSPORT — Tracy’s Karate of Ellsworth recently held its 104th tournament at Bucksport High School.The event was a big draw with more than 200 competitors in attendance. Students from dojos in Ellsworth, on Mount Desert Island and in Deer Isle, Belfast, Bucksport, Bangor, Yarmouth, Houlton, Presque Isle and even parts of Canada came together to compete for trophies in both fighting and throwing.Immediately following the conclusion of the tournament, all black belts traveled to the main school in Ellsworth for testing. Twenty students were promoted to various degrees in the black belt ranks. Eight of those students were first-time black belts, and seven were classified as juniors (16 years old or younger).The 20 black belts promoted to higher ranks were (first degree) Natalie Jagels, Lillian Noyes, Erin Leonardi, Haley Leonardi, Carlina Leonardi, Camden Hatch, Robert Giles and Colton White; (second degree) Marleigh Richardson, Caroline Tracy, Andy Hartt, Charlotte Hartt, Sadie Hartt and Jonathan Robinson; (third degree) Chris Dyer, Nick Parlatore, Cameron Sarchi and Mitch Wheeler; (seventh degree) Dean Murphy; (eighth degree) Kristy Tracy-Dawes.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textTrophy winners were Owen DiDonato, Ryan Gross, Jordan Brouty, Ziva Marceill, Lillian Noyes, Lauryn Noyes, Elura Dorr, Bridget Kutny, Amy Santos, Dean Murphy, William Wilson, Shawn Murphy, John Baranowski, Tom Anderson, Colton White, Lance Kennedy, Piper Marceill, Natalie Jagels, Aiden Benner, Paige Trader and Steve Trader. Black belt grand champions were Kristy Tracy-Dawes, Eric Tracy, Linwood Bridges and Matthew Edgerly.Dennis and Karen Tracy oversaw the events with the help of Tracy-Dawes, their daughter. The family has owned Tracy’s Karate since opening it in 1971.Tracy’s Karate will be holding its next tournament at Bucksport High School on Oct. 27.last_img read more

Read more

COVID-19 made me realize life’s more than just cricket: Jemimah Rodrigues

first_imgNEW DELHI: The COVID-19-induced break served as a ‘blessing in disguise’ for me as it helped overcome the heart-wrenching defeat that India suffered in the women’s T20 World Cup final against Australia in March, India’s top-order batswoman Jemimah Rodrigues has revealed.On March 8, hosts Australia shattered India’s dream of winning their maiden World Cup in front of a record crowd at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. That match turned out to be the last women’s international this year. “It’s never easy coming back after the World Cup. We were in Australia for more than a month and a half. Also, losing the World Cup was also not easy, both mentally and emotionally,” Jemimah, 20, told IANS in an exclusive interview. “You need some time to recover and get back into the groove. So, the lockdown has been a blessing in disguise to get back to that emotional space that we normally like to be in. However, the break has been there for too long. We can’t just wait to get back on to the field and play cricket,” she said. In the last edition of the women’s T20 World Cup, Australia scripted their fifth triumph, defeating the Harmanpreet Kaur-led young Indian team by 85 runs in the final. And Jemimah feels it was the lack of execution that led to the team’s defeat. “It was the execution of the plan which according to me led to our defeat. Australia had a plan, they stuck to it, and executed it well. We also had a plan, but the execution couldn’t come from our side. So, I guess we lacked on the execution part.” The young player from Mumbai revealed the biggest lessons she has learned in the past six months, during the Covid-induced lockdown. “I realised how blessed we are. We travel to places and are playing cricket. But all of a sudden, everything came to a halt and I was able to spend some time with myself and with my family,” she said. “I realised life is more than just cricket. Cricket is a great sport and I love playing it and once I get back to the field, I will surely give my 100 per cent. But cricket is just a part of my life. There are many more things in my life such as family, friends which are equally important,” she emphasised. “During the lockdown I realised so many people are struggling to get their basic needs fulfilled. However, I was blessed to have a house, a family to be my side to take care of me, had food to eat, and water to drink — small-small things that we often take for granted.” After the pandemic impacted the entire world since early this year, the women’s World Cup, which was scheduled to be played in February next year in New Zealand, has been postponed until 2022. And Jemimah believes the postponement has allowed the team to prepare better for the prestigious tournament. IANS Also Watch: Special Trains from September 12: Here are the Detailslast_img read more

Read more

FOUR DONEGAL PEOPLE NAMED IN TAX DEFAULTERS LIST

first_imgTHE REVENUE Commissioners have announced €13.2 million in fines and back taxes issued against 72 people or businesses across the country.Four of those who have paid back taxes and/or paid fines are from County Donegal.They are: * Gerard Diver, Cashel, Gortahork, (builder), who paid more than €45k in taxes and more than €24k in penalties and interest. Total paid €70k.* John McConnell, Main Street, Ballybofey, (butcher) who paid more than €24k in taxes and more than €45k in penalties and interest. Total paid €69,888.* Rhona McLoughlin, 16 Upper Main Street, Buncrana (publican) who paid more than €35k in tax and more than €17k in penalties and interest. Total paid €52,323.* John McCrudden, 2 St Mary’s Road, Buncrana (plumber) who paid €77k in taxes and €31k in penalties and interest. Total paid to the Revenue was €108,359.The settlements were made between July and September this year and officially published by the Government. FOUR DONEGAL PEOPLE NAMED IN TAX DEFAULTERS LIST was last modified: December 6th, 2010 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read more

Lockyer joins suit on field-lab cleanup

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant Department of Energy project manager Mike Lopez said he couldn’t comment because of the ongoing lawsuit. In the past, DOE officials have said they are following all state and federal safety laws and have rejected charges that the site will be dangerous. Also, the agency was concerned that the lawsuit would slow down the lab cleanup. Lockyer joins the Natural Resources Defense Council, the city of Los Angeles and longtime lab watchdog group Committee to Bridge the Gap, which sued the DOE in 2004 over the lab decontamination. “The California Attorney General’s Office understands this is an issue of statewide importance,” said James Birkelund, senior project attorney at the NRDC. “If the Bush administration can ignore the law here then they can get away with it at other sites across the country.” The 2,800-acre field lab sits in the Simi Hills in Ventura County, near the Los Angeles city line. From the 1940s through 1988, the federal government conducted nuclear energy testing on a 90-acre section of the lab called the Energy Technology Engineering Center. Concerned that too much radioactive and toxic contamination could be left in the Simi Hills, state Attorney General Bill Lockyer has filed a legal brief in support of a lawsuit challenging the cleanup of the Santa Susana Field Lab’s former nuclear research area. Lockyer’s involvement pressures the U.S. Department of Energy to re-evaluate its plan to decontaminate the site. Critics charge that the DOE has broken promises to thoroughly clean the site and say the federal agency’s plan would leave 99 percent of the tainted soil on hilltop property. Lockyer spokeswoman Teresa Schilling said the attorney general decided to get involved and push for a more thorough environmental study because the DOE plans to release the site for unrestricted use, which could include building houses on the land. “If ever there was a case to push for a full environmental analysis, this is one,” Schilling said. “It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know you have to do a full environmental analysis on a site that has had nuclear activity before you turn it over to another use.” ETEC was home to 10 nuclear reactors, one of which experienced a partial meltdown in 1959. Nuclear research ended and the Energy Department began its self-regulated decontamination in 1988. Kerry Cavanaugh, (818) 713-3746 kerry.cavanaugh@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read more

Women’s Basketball Falls To Green Bay

first_img Box Score (PDF) Story Links William Penn 12/11/2015 – 11:00 AM Box Score (HMTL) Full Schedule Roster Next Game: Photo Gallery Preview Buy Tickets Live Stats ESPN 1350 The Valley On ESPN 3 Listen Live Watch Live DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University women’s basketball team fell to a hot-shooting Green Bay team, 86-61, Sunday afternoon at the Knapp Center. Green Bay (4-2) was led by a career game from Allie LeClaire, who had 30 points on 9-of-13 shooting, including knocking down eight three pointers. Drake (6-2), who came into the game averaging over 80.0 points a game, was held to its season-low in points. “They [Green Bay] are a tough defensive team,” said Drake head coach Jennie Baranczyk. “We had too many break downs, where we had some uncharacteristic turnovers during this game. Our mindset is going to be to get better every day moving forward and get ready for Friday.” Freshman Sara Rhine (Eldon, Mo.) scored a career-high 22 points along with pulling down a game-high nine rebounds for the Bulldogs. Junior Lizzy Wendell (Blue Springs, Mo.) followed with 15 points.As a team, the Bulldogs finished at 82.4 percent from the free-throw line (14-of-17) and had 25 points from their bench. However, Drake made just 3-of-26 from beyond the arc and 22-of-55 from the floor. Green Bay finished with 12 team three-pointers. “We just weren’t all there tonight,” said Wendell of her team’s second consecutive loss. “I think our mindset is to get better, but we have to take it possession by possession. It’s something we need to get back to this week moving forward and be ready to go Friday.” The Bulldogs will take on William Penn on Friday, Dec. 11 for their annual “Pack the Knapp” contest. Tipoff is scheduled for 11 a.m. at the Knapp Center and the game will be broadcast online on The Valley On ESPN3. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Read more