Infrastructure: Key to Quality of Life

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has said that the availability of quality infrastructure, which her government is endeavoring to provide for the Liberian people, is the key to quality livelihood for the people.President Sirleaf stressed that if basic infrastructure, including roads, electricity and water, that have been non-functional for decades as a result of the civil conflict, are rehabilitated, they will improve the quality of life of Liberians.She said these infrastructures will eventually improve other services such as education, quality healthcare, as well as boost agriculture which remains Liberia’s potential for investment and growth. Receiving the Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation of the Netherlands, Ms. Lilianne Ploumen and delegation at her Foreign Affairs Ministry office this week, President Sirleaf expressed appreciation for their visit.Ms. Ploumen, at the head of a high-level trade mission, including representatives of at least 30 Dutch companies, was in the country for a one-day Liberia-Netherlands Business and Investment Dialogue.President Sirleaf pointed out that Liberia is open for business, especially businesses that will foster inclusive economic growth. She used the occasion to appeal for investment in the country’s youthful population.She also assured Ms. Ploumen and delegation that their investment, would be “fully protected” under the laws of Liberia.President Sirleaf meanwhile recalled the strong ties subsisting between Liberia and the Netherlands beginning with the Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM) becoming one of the first international airlines to operate in Liberia after the construction of the Roberts International Airport (RIA).Minister Ploumen, in response, expressed appreciation to President Sirleaf for the opportunity afforded them to undertake, what she termed “This unique visit to Liberia.” She also assured Liberians of their interest to invest in Liberia, especially the country’s young population.She disclosed that the Dutch entrepreneurs see many opportunities in working with Liberia. Ms. Ploumen stated that the entrepreneurs have not come to Liberia for a “quick wins”; rather they were in Liberia for a long term commitment to the people and to invest in its economy.She then pledged to work with the Liberian government in attracting Dutch private investment saying, “We will work with our friends and private companies to invest in Liberia favorably.”She highlighted the upcoming financial conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia next week to boost economic growth and capacity building in the countries worst affected by Ebola, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.The delegation was accompanied to the office of the President by Liberia’s Ambassador to the European Union, Isaac W. Nyenabo. The delegation thereafter departed for Sierra Leone.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Family escapes harm from fallen tree

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Trees in the area are trimmed every three years, and they were due for their next pruning early next year. An arborist inspects the trees each year. The last inspection was in the spring, said Penny Hansen, of consultant Greenplace Landscape Management. “These trees get big,” Hansen said. “When they get big, the limbs get heavy and there’s always that risk.” Trees in the common areas in the Del Valle tract and two other nearby tracts are owned by the homeowners but maintained by the city, as part of a landscape maintenance district. Chris Palmieri, a project development coordinator who works with the city’s 33 landscape maintenance districts, said the city loses trees from this type of defect occasionally, but it is almost impossible to detect visually before a tree falls. He said the landscape maintenance district will pay to remove the fallen pine, which could run $3,000 to $5,000. The Wilsons said they reported the incident to their insurance company, and Palmieri said they can also file a claim with the city’s risk management department, which handles property damage claims. Several neighbors expressed concerns about the tall trees, noting other pines had fallen in recent years. “It’s a wake-up call,” said Sanjay Gupta. “I think they should check the big trees and if they see anything that should be taken care of they should do it prior to anything happening rather than later.” VALENCIA – A family looked on Monday morning as chain saw-wielding workers perched on their roof to help remove a 5-ton section of a pine tree that fell the day before. Arborists decided to remove the other two trunks from the 80-foot-tall, three-trunk Italian stone pine rooted in a common area uphill from the Avenida Frasca home. “We thought it was the big earthquake,” said homeowner Edna Wilson, whose 22-year-old daughter Sarah was asleep in the bedroom below. “It could have crashed through the roof and killed my daughter.” Arborist Edwin Vargas, whose tree-care company TruGreen LandCare contracts with the city, deduced the cause of the split was a weak attachment where the multiple trunks fused. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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