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first_imgMONACO (AP):A ninth Monte Carlo Masters title is getting closer for Rafael Nadal with most of his rivals out of the way – including Roger Federer, who again misses out on one of the few trophies not already in his glittering collection.But Federer – a four-time runner-up on the French Riviera – was not too disappointed, considering that his priority was to come back safely after more than two months out following knee surgery.Nadal beat Stan Wawrinka 6-1, 6-4 yesterday to set up a third semi-final here against Andy Murray. Federer lost 3-6, 6-2, 7-5 to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, despite being two points from victory when 5-4 up in the decider, with Tsonga 15-30 down on his serve.This was Federer’s first tournament play since arthroscopic surgery on his left knee for torn cartilage on February 3, and defeat was softened by relief at avoiding any relapse.”It was good to play back-to-back, yesterday and today, good to play 2 hours 10 (minutes) today,” Federer said. “It was nice to play an intense match. I’m happy how the body reacted.”With top-ranked Novak Djokovic and Wawrinka – the French Open champion – also out, Federer himself picked Nadal when asked about the favourite.Nadal leads Murray 16-6 in career meetings and 6-1 on clay. For the other two semi-finalists, Nadal is 11-2 up on Gael Monfils – 4-0 on clay – and 8-4 on Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, having beaten him here in the semi-finals three years ago. Nadal went on to lose the 2013 final to Djokovic, who was stunned in the second round this year by Czech Jiri Vesely, an unheralded Czech player ranked 55th.In a one-sided contest between former champions, Nadal broke Wawrinka four times and made the semi-finals for the 11th time.Murray took out Milos Raonic 6-2, 6-0 for the second time this year.The Briton thinks patience will be the key factor against the nine-time French Open champion.last_img read more

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first_imgIn a tortoise-and-hare kind of story, a team of geneticists figured out what happens when positive natural selection tries to outrun mutations: “mutation rate catastrophe.”  Publishing in PNAS,1 they described how beneficial mutations might become established in a population rapidly (that’s the hare).  Eventually (this is the tortoise), harmful mutations accumulate to the tipping point, and the population goes extinct.    The abstract begins with one of only two praises of natural selection (both qualified with reality checks):The intricate adjustment of organisms to their environment demonstrates the effectiveness of natural selection.  But Darwin himself recognized that certain biological features could limit this effectiveness, features that generally reduce the efficiency of natural selection or yield suboptimal adaptation.  Genetic linkage is known to be one such feature, and here we show theoretically that it can introduce a more sinister flaw: when there is complete linkage between loci affecting fitness and loci affecting mutation rate, positive natural selection and recurrent mutation can drive mutation rates in an adapting population to intolerable levels.The only other praise of natural selection was more of an insult.  Calling it robust does not help it jump the high hurdles their model revealed.  In a section called “How Genetic Linkage Can Subvert Natural Selection,” they spoke of it as a myopic fallen hero:Our theoretical findings indicate that mutator hitchhiking can set in motion a self-reinforcing loss of replication fidelity, but the question of how a process as robust as natural selection could allow this to happen remains.  The key fact is that natural selection, although eminently robust, is a short-sighted process that favors traits with immediate fitness benefits.  The fitness cost of mutator hitchhiking is generally not anticipated because of the slow accumulation of deleterious load.  When a mutator hitchhikes with a new beneficial mutation, a simple model shows that the increased deleterious load due to the mutator is in fact suppressed during the spread of the beneficial mutation.  Indeed, the full fitness cost of the mutator is only realized well after the beneficial mutation has stopped spreading…. A mutator may therefore enjoy the immediate benefit of producing a new beneficial mutation without anticipating the eventual increase in deleterious load.  Because of this delay in the accumulation of deleterious load, natural selection can drive mutation rate up to the point of no return….Indeed, their graphs all show that the temporary, wobbly rises of evolutionary progress under the best of conditions all come crashing down suddenly in the end.    This particular study involved asexual, one-celled organisms.  It was not purely theoretical, though.  They stated that it is known that bad mutations “hitchhike” on the same genes with rare beneficial mutations.  Fatal mutations, of course, kill the organism right off, but some bad mutations delay their harm, adding to the mutational load over time.  Eventually, they catch up and, like the tortoise, win the race after the hare is pooped out.    Why don’t the beneficial mutations ever win?  After all, they can spread rapidly in a population.  The reason is that fitness is short-sighted.  Natural selection cannot see down the road or have a goal.  It can only act on the immediate consequences of a change.  Harmful mutations, by contrast, are not necessarily weeded out immediately.  Consider, for instance, a slightly damaged proofreading enzyme.  It may not kill the organism right off the bat.  Give it time, though, and the damage will add up – right after the beneficial mutation has reached equilibrium in the population.  Their model shows that the mutation rate actually accelerates over time.  Surprisingly, it is the very process of adaptation for fitness that accelerates the mutation rate – not just in bacteria, but in higher organisms, too:There is almost certainly no physiological barrier to such an effect in most organisms: the genomic mutation rate in organisms from viruses to eukaryotes is a quantitative trait affected by many mutations whose effects can readily cumulate to intolerable levels of error.  In what follows, we show that there need not be a selective barrier to this process either: because the full fitness effect of increased deleterious mutation takes some time to accumulate after a higher mutation rate has evolved, it is theoretically possible for a population to evolve a critically high mutation rate and subsequently go extinct.The team tweaked the parameters of their mathematical model in various ways to try to get natural selection to make some headway.  They used infinite populations and small populations.  They used large and small genome sizes.  All efforts yielded the same result: negative mutations eventually swamped any gains from positive natural selection.  In cases of sustained “arms races,” like bacterial invaders vs. the immune system in mammals, the antagonists may struggle back and forth till both fall off the cliff.2  Surprisingly, the beneficial mutation itself may trigger the catastrophe.  Under equilibrium conditions, mutations tend to accumulate slowly, especially if some error correction mechanism is present.  A new beneficial mutation changes the rules.  Now, the population is adapting to a new situation, and the model shows that mutation rate rises to the occasion.    In short, the population has no way to break even.  In a section called “Evolutionary Implications,” they wrote, “Our results suggest the possibility of a novel complement to existing explanations for why truly asexual populations are evolutionarily short-lived.”  Pick your poison: “Either an asexual population does not adapt and goes extinct as a result of the slow accumulation of deleterious mutations, as suggested by existing theory, or else it adapts and goes extinct as a result of the mutation-rate catastrophe.”    How, then, could these authors, being evolutionists, keep faith in neo-Darwinian theory, which relies on mutation and natural selection?  Since their study concerned only asexual organisms, they assumed that early one-celled organisms quickly learned about this problem and adapted ways to get around it.  Maybe they invented proofreading.  Maybe they tried recombination.  Eventually, the idea goes, sexual reproduction arrived and helped mask the effects of “mutation rate catastrophe.”  But they freely admit this is all just speculation:It is tempting to speculate that the mutation rate catastrophe phenomenon that we have observed here played a role in the early establishment of recombination in the most primitive life forms (41).  It seems probable that adaptation was continual in primordial populations and that only rudimentary mechanisms of genomic proofreading and repair had evolved, such that mutation rates were closer to intolerable values than they are in most present forms.  Under these circumstances, the mutation-rate catastrophe could have posed an imminent threat to any purely asexual population.Nevertheless, they did not offer any detailed models of how the catastrophe could be avoided.  Other studies have denied that sexual reproduction offers any resistance to mutational load (10/12/2000, 05/16/2004).  The origin of sex has been called the “queen of evolutionary problems” (04/14/2003).  With 20 competing theories about what it’s good for, it would seem a hard sell that claim sex came to the rescue to prevent error catastrophe.    These problems are not new.  Other evolutionists have written about “mutational meltdown” (12/14/2006).  Hermann Joseph Muller in 1932 described “Muller’s Ratchet,” a principle that shows mutations in asexual populations accumulate in an irreversible manner.  “Our findings depart from previous work, however,” they said, “by showing that such high mutation rates can be the catastrophic result of unfettered natural selection.”    Neo-Darwinian theory may suffer from this model, but there is one bright side for biomedical research.  Maybe pharmacists can take advantage of this finding and help pathogens to mutate themselves to death: “Our results suggest the interesting and related possibility that the adaptive immune response itself could drive a purely clonal pathogen to mutation rate catastrophe and extinction within the host.”  Locked in an arms race, the pathogen and the immune system can drive the germs over the cliff like a big buffalo jump.  “This mechanism could, in theory, help to explain the spontaneous clearance of some viral infections and suggests that recombination, which prevents runaway increases in mutation rate, may be essential to the persistence of other viral infections that are not cleared.”  Now you know why your cold or flu eventually clears up on its own.    One final question: does recombination really prevent mutational catastrophe?  They did not discuss this “suggestion” in any detail.  They only assumed that it would.  Other studies reported here indicate that recombination, while it may stabilize the genome and aid genetic repair (07/18/2001, 07/31/2002), cannot add new genetic information (08/20/2003) and, at best, only delays the inevitable (10/19/2004, 12/14/2006)  Some recombinations, in fact, can be toxic (10/27/2005, bullet 3).  It would seem that adding another random influence in the mix would not overcome the “genetic entropy” of cumulative mutations.1Philip J. Gerrish, Alexandre Colato, Alan S. Perelson, and Paul D. Sniegowski, “Evolution: Complete genetic linkage can subvert natural selection,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0607280104, published online before print April 3, 2007.2See the “Red Queen Effect” – i.e., running and getting nowhere, 09/07/2006.  The authors modeled the Red Queen Effect in the context of pathogen-immune arms races.  Their graph shows an upward adaptational fight ending in sudden collapse.OK, how many times do we have to show that neo-Darwinism has been falsified for its disciples to throw in the towel?  (For a partial list, see 10/19/2004, 11/29/2004, and 12/14/2006).  Jason Wolf told us four years ago how indirect genetic effects produce “slippage on the treadmill” that hinders evolutionary progress (see 03/17/2003).  Now, this paper practically waxes the treadmill to a shiny, frictionless surface, complete with banana peel.  Think of it: neo-Darwinists have pinned their hopes on the rare, mythical “beneficial mutations” to generate novelty, and for natural selection to save every blessed tidbit in its sieve, leading to the wondrous variety of adapted life (wave the magic wand of millions of years here).  But now, their own mechanisms have turned on them.  Beneficial mutations (if there are such things) actually trigger a mutational arms race.  This subverts natural selection, begins a mutational meltdown, and sends the population off the cliff to extinction.  Charlie will never get endless forms most beautiful at this rate.    He who has ears to hear, let him hear (04/06/2007).  If you have placed your eternal hopes on Charlie’s natural selection tale to win the cosmic lottery without responsibility to your Maker, then have faith.  You’re going to need a lot of it.(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province:Sugarcane Fields in the north coast region.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goat on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res imageCOUNTRYSIDE 23: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jerry HagstromDTN Political CorrespondentWASHINGTON (DTN) — Following the defeat of two bills to address 2018 and 2019 disasters on the Senate floor Monday evening, Democrats offered a new plan to address Puerto Rico while Republicans criticized their colleagues for blocking urgently needed aid to other parts of the country.Senate Appropriations Committee Vice Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., on Tuesday introduced a substitute to the emergency disaster supplemental while the House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee addressed the issue at a hearing on the rural economy.Democrats want more aid for Puerto Rico than the Republicans have proposed. On Monday evening, neither a Republican proposal that contained $600 million in additional food stamp benefits for Puerto nor the House-passed bill that is more generous to Puerto Rico got the 60 votes needed to proceed.Meanwhile, Senate Republicans blamed Democrats for stopping both the aid to Puerto Rico that was in the Republican bill and aid to farmers.Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said, “Senate Democrats yesterday blocked a bill that provides much-needed funds for Puerto Rico’s nutrition program, also aid for the 2018 hurricane and wildfires, and thirdly assistance to Midwest states in the midst of a flood crisis.”“That includes at least Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, maybe other states,” Grassley said.“Now, the people that voted against it say it was because they care about Puerto Rico. But the bill they blocked takes care of the urgent funding shortfalls there in that commonwealth,” he said.“Playing politics with disaster aid does a disservice to the people of Puerto Rico and the people of states like Iowa that are suffering right now from these floods,” Grassley said. “Why would these senators want to come to campaign in Iowa when they don’t show sympathy for Iowans suffering from the floods with the vote that they cast last night?”At a House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee hearing on the rural economy Tuesday, Paxton Poitevint, the president and CEO of Southwest Georgia Farm Credit in Bainbridge, Georgia, said that while crop insurance, commodity programs and trade agreements are helping, the cotton and nut farmers whose crops were devastated by Hurricane Michael and timber growers in his area “need federal disaster assistance now.”House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., said at the hearing, “To be honest, I did not think we’d still be sitting here in April without a disaster aid package signed into law.”Bishop added that he is “extremely frustrated” and “hopeful it will happen soon.”Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., whose district has been devastated by floods, said that as bad as the agricultural losses are now, they “are going to mount.”Iowa officials estimate about $214 million in agricultural losses and more than $1.6 billion in total disaster losses. Nebraska officials estimate agricultural losses could top $1 billion because of as much as $500 million in livestock losses and $400 million in crop losses, as well as prevented planting challenges this spring. Nebraska officials estimate another $450 million just in road damages. Missouri officials have not released any estimates, but parts of northwest Missouri and southwest Iowa remain underwater.The Leahy/Schumer amendment totals $16.7 billion and includes $2.5 billion in new funding for disaster-stricken communities in the Southeast and Midwest and restores certain funding for Puerto Rico and other territories.Leahy and Schumer said, “We cannot pick and choose which American citizens to help in times of crisis. Democrats are ready to stand with all American communities affected by recent natural disasters. We hope Republican leadership will stand with us in this effort.”The amendment includes increased funding for Community Development Block Grants and grants to help rebuild damaged water systems in Puerto Rico. It also provides Medicaid funding for other territories and mandates that the Department of Housing and Urban Development speed up the release of billions in Community Development Block Grant funding the Trump administration has been withholding from disaster stricken communities.Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., whose constituents suffered from wildfires and forest fires in 2018, voted against the Republican bill and said, “In California, the scale of last year’s destruction was unprecedented. Wildfires killed 85 people, destroyed nearly 14,000 homes and burned more than 150,000 acres, including the entire town of Paradise. Recovery efforts are already underway and additional funding is needed to prevent any delay.”“Tragically, Californians aren’t the only Americans still trying to recover,” Feinstein said. “Victims of recent typhoons, volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes and hurricanes, including those that struck Puerto Rico two years ago, are also counting on Congress to approve this funding.“Congress used to set politics aside after major disasters and help victims in their time of need. Partisan infighting won’t rebuild a single home or school. It’s time we pass an emergency supplemental bill that includes funding for all disaster victims.”President Donald Trump has said he does not want to provide any aid to Puerto Rico beyond the money for food stamps. Trump called the leaders of Puerto “incompetent and corrupt” and made statements that are factually incorrect, The New York Times reported.Jerry Hagstrom can be reached at jhagstrom@njdc.comFollow him on Twitter @hagstromreport(CC/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgEarly "Badgers Badgers Badgers" viral video.badgers badgers badgers mushroom mushroomFriday morning, Wisconsin and Under Armour officially announced a 10-year contract worth $96 million. One of the apparel manufacturer’s biggest clients came up with a very cool way to welcome the Badgers to the family.Upon hearing the news, Notre Dame tweeted out a video of the famous viral “Badgers” clip with audio of House of Pain’s “Jump Around” – an ode to one of the best Wisconsin football traditions. Check it out:Welcome to #TeamUA, @UWBadgers. You know what to do… @UnderArmour pic.twitter.com/2SOcRLHzLG— The Fighting Irish (@FightingIrish) October 9, 2015Well played, Fighting Irish social media manager.last_img

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first_img Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Desmond McKenzie, is calling for the strengthening of the local government regime in the region. While here, the Mayor will visit the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM); meeting with the Mayors of Kingston and St. Ann’s Bay, and with representatives of the Social Development Commission (SDC). Mr. McKenzie told JIS News that he is hoping that the visit to Jamaica by Mayor Glen Ram, Chairman of the Mayaro Rio Claro Regional Corporation in Trinidad and Tobago, will help to rebuild the regional local government regime. Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Desmond McKenzie, is calling for the strengthening of the local government regime in the region.“There is a lack of a coordinated effort between countries in the region that actually practise local (governance). There are only a few countries that have such a system,” the Minister noted.Mr. McKenzie told JIS News that he is hoping that the visit to Jamaica by Mayor Glen Ram, Chairman of the Mayaro Rio Claro Regional Corporation in Trinidad and Tobago, will help to rebuild the regional local government regime.“We are hoping that out of this visit by Mayor Ram we can forge and develop a stronger local government fraternity in the region,” the Minister said.Mayor Ram arrived in Jamaica on August 9 for a five-day visit, as the guest of the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development, to observe the local government reform processes.While here, the Mayor will visit the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM); meeting with the Mayors of Kingston and St. Ann’s Bay, and with representatives of the Social Development Commission (SDC).For his part, Mayor Ram expressed gratitude to Mr. McKenzie and the Local Government Ministry for hosting him.He explained that the primary objective of his visit is geared towards strengthening local government practices in the region.Mayor Ram pointed out that there are many similarities between the two countries, in terms of local governance, and indicated that, currently, in Trinidad and Tobago there is an ongoing effort to strengthen the local government process, so the visit is indeedtimely. Story Highlightslast_img read more

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first_imgKarachi: A high-level security delegation of Sri Lanka Cricket Board, led by its secretary Mohan de Silva, will reach Karachi on Tuesday to find out if it is safe to send its team for a Test series against Pakistan later this year. The four-member delegation, which will also visit Lahore, will prepare a report on the basis of which the SLC will take a decision on whether to send its Test team to Pakistan in October. The other members of the delegation are Air Chief Marshal Roshan Goonetileke, SLC’s head of international cricket Chandima Mapatuna and assistant manager anti-corruption and security Mudiyanselage Palitha Seneviratne. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh They will be in Karachi till Wednesday and then proceed to Lahore on Thursday before flying back home on August 9. The delegation has been sent by SLC after the Pakistan Cricket Board requested them to play a two-match Test series of the ICC World Test Championship in Pakistan. The delegation will visit the match venues, team hotels and also meet PCB officials and top security and police officers during their three-day visit. Sri Lanka was the last team to play a Test in Pakistan in March 2009 when it came under terrorist attack in Lahore which eventually led to top Test teams refusing to tour Pakistan because of security concerns. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later Zakir Khan, who is the Director of International Cricket Operations in the PCB, said that Pakistan was confident that it would be able to host the two Tests in Karachi and Lahore. “But we can’t say anything for certain until the SLC security delegation returns home and submits its report to their board,” he said. Khan said the fact that the Sri Lankan board was sending a high-powered delegation to Pakistan showed they were seriously considering PCB’s request for the tour. The PCB is hoping that if Sri Lanka sends its team to Pakistan, it would become easier to convince the Bangladesh Cricket Board to also play Tests in Pakistan early next year. The PCB is also eagerly awaiting a visit by top officials of Cricket Australia and England and Wales Cricket Board to Lahore sometime in October.last_img read more

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first_imgImphal: The cabinet of Manipur Chief Minister N Biren Singh has declared a drought-like situation in the state owing to scant rain that have led to crop failures in over 70 blocks of the state, a government release said.The decision was taken on Saturday to seek relief from the Centre, the statement by N Geoffrey, secretary to the chief minister, said.”Rain deficit this year has affected crops in over 70 blocks of the state. Villages that have witnessed crop failures ranging between 33 per cent and more than 50 per cent have been categorised as moderately and severely affected,” it said.Prior to the cabinet meeting, the chief minister chaired a high-level emergency meeting with cabinet ministers, MLAs, top officials, deputy commissioners of 16 districts and representatives of agricultural institutes to discuss the situation, it said.last_img read more

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first_imgMira Sorvino wrote an Op-Ed in the LA Times this week, covering how California has the potential to be the leader in sexual harassment protection.We now stand a year in from the publication of the fateful articles in the New York Times and the New Yorker that first exposed the predation of film world titan Harvey Weinstein,” she wrote. “I was one of the women interviewed by journalist Ronan Farrow, and I contributed my story because I wanted to make change in the world into which my daughters and sons will come of age.“To institute lasting change, and promote protection and equality under the law for everyone, we must enact legislation that reflects our newfound awareness. Since last winter, I have been championing a slate of bills in the California Legislature under the hashtag #TakeTheLead, which refers to the state’s opportunity to move to the forefront of protecting women’s and all workers’ rights. Co-sponsored by Equal Rights Advocates and the California Employment Lawyers Assn., this is the toughest slate of anti-sexual harassment bills in the nation.“Five critical bills concerning workplace harassment — AB 1870, SB 224, SB 1343, SB 1300 and AB 3080 — sit on the governor’s desk… Yet we in the survivor community hear that Brown is under intense lobbying pressure to veto at least one of the bills, SB 1300, which would do away with non-disparagement clauses that are slipped into routine paperwork employees must sign when they’re hired, offered a raised or given a bonus. The clauses can come with a hefty fine (up to $1 million) if employees do speak out — against, for example, an abusive boss — even if the statements are true and the conduct broke the law. Untold numbers of victims have been silenced this way, especially those who lack the financial resources for a long, drawn-out legal battle to fight the unfairness of the clause.“Gov. Brown has spoken out vehemently against corruption, dishonesty and abuse of power in government. Now we urge him to oppose corrupt corporate interests that seek to stifle survivors’ voices and protect illegal, inhuman behavior. We ask him to stand with the millions of people around the world who have raised their voices in a brave chorus of #MeToo and #TimesUp, and to add to his legacy the fearless protection of all working people. We count on him to sign all five bills, and to turn a dream of our movement into reality.”To read the full Op-Ed, click here.last_img read more

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first_imgFORT NELSON, B.C. – A refrigerated food truck slipped then tipped over in a ditch, north of Fort Nelson leaving its food available for residents to load up on before the contents of the truck spoiled.Friday, December 14th, a refrigerated truck carrying $150,000 of meat, produce and fruit became an unexpected gift to the community of Fort Nelson. The truck was headed to a grocery store in Alaska, unfortunately, it ended up in a ditch then tipping over. The driver of the truck was without injury yet the contents of the truck now tampered could not be delivered.Devan Boynton and Jenna Mickie Owners/ Operators of Archies Towing recovered the tipped over truck on Saturday, December 15th and were able to get the refrigeration on the truck running to protect the food and not to spoil the produce because of the cold temperatures outside. With the truck parked in the work yard and the permission of the company owner to give away the food. Boynton and Mickie were ready to share. “The food was perfectly packaged and sealed it was in good condition to be given away,” said Boynton who welcomed the community to his towing business’s property so the contents of the truck could be removed and accessed by the community.Sunday, December 16th word had made its way to the FB Group, ‘Rants and Raves Fort Nelson’ via several live videos posted by Lisa Gustafson.  The videos showed a loader removing pallets of food from the truck as smiling happy people urge one another to take food before it spoils from the cold.Close to 500 people came to Archie’s towing, all the food was salvaged and nothing went to waste, residents used boxes, crates and recycle bags as they shared and took food they would use. Packages of meat were wrapped and ready to be sold as they even had price tags, there were hams. pork, chicken, produce included cucumbers, carrots, tomatoes and lettuce. There was even fruit, such as strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and grapes.Boynton and his business partner/wife Jenna Mickie were very happy, “We felt really good,” said Boynton “We thank the town for helping us and it was nice to welcome the community to see our new location.”last_img read more

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