Tag: 上海龙凤shlf最新地址

CATEGORIES:

first_img He considers both Hansle Parchment and Omar McLeod, who finished second and sixth, respectively, in the World Championships, as potential Olympic champions. “If he (McLeod) performs to his real technical excellence, I don’t see why he shouldn’t be up there among the medals,” said Blake in reference to McLeod, who was far from his best in Beijing. Regarding Parchment, Blake said, “He keeps getting better every time he performs in the big events.” “He should also be there,” concluded the JAAA President, “as a medal contender for the gold.” He welcomed the Government-funded athlete support programme and reported that his association is currently looking for sponsors to contribute to a feeding programme. “Right now, we’re looking sponsorship to put in a feeding programme, so that the clubs can optimise the performance of their athletes,” said Blake. Jamaica’s best-ever medal tally at an Olympic Games came in 2012 in London when 12 medals (four gold, four silver, four bronze) were secured, all in athletics. Potential champs Athletics chief Warren Blake believes that Jamaica can top the track and field medal table at this summer’s Olympic Games. Blake, president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), says the 110-metre hurdles and the men’s 4×400-metre relays are the events that could make the difference. The JAAA president is quietly confident about the prospects for the nation’s athletes for 2016. Reflecting on the seven gold-medal haul achieved by Jamaica at last year’s World Championships in Beijing, Blake stated: “If we had gotten another gold, and there are places where we could have gotten another gold but it just didn’t work out, we would have topped the medal table.” In Beijing, Jamaica won gold medals courtesy of Usain Bolt in the men’s 100 and 200 metres, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in the ladies’ 100m, Danielle Williams in the 100m hurdles, both 4×100 metres relays and the ladies’ 4×400 metres. However, Kenya edged Jamaica to top the table by one gold medal. Blake is, however, foreseeing a change for the better. “Strategically, we think that come the Olympics this year, we are really in a good position to top the athletics medal table,” Blake said. “If you look at the areas in which we did well in 2015, we are set to still do well in those areas and we have a good crop of 400m runners coming up,” he added. “Our hurdlers,” Blake continued, “both on the male and female sides, are expected to do well again this year, and, with a bit of luck, we can do better in the male hurdles.”last_img read more

Read More
CATEGORIES:

first_imgThe SAT-3 cable emerges from the watersat one of its landing points. SAT-3 snakes along the seabed onits way from South Africa to Portugal.(Both images: SAT-3/WASC/SAFE)Janine ErasmusA new study by a US-based investment advisory firm suggests that Africa’s broadband market is set to quadruple by 2012, with the current 2.7-million users soaring to 12.7-million. Aimed at service providers, investors and infrastructure suppliers, the study was conducted in 33 African markets.Although based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the work of AfricaNext Investment Research is focused on Africa, specifically on that continent’s telecommunications, media and technology sectors. The company is interested not only in Africa’s largest economies, such as South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya, but also in emerging markets such as Ethiopia and the Central African Republic.With its report titled 3G, WiMAX, ADSL and the Future of African Broadband, the company aims to dispel the pessimism that has pervaded the broadband sector in recent years. AfricaNext attributes the low incidence of broadband penetration in Africa until now to a variety of factors such as expensive services, high prices for international bandwidth, dilapidated infrastructure, and restrictive regulatory frameworks.However, a number of new, more positive factors are coming into play at the same time, says the company, and suddenly the future of broadband in Africa is looking much brighter. In fact, the continent should prepare itself for a surge in broadband growth over the next four years.These factors are diverse and include, among others, last mile competition, international gateway licensing, new submarine cables, domestic fibre backbone developments, unified licences, improvements in radio spectral efficiency, increased internet usage from a younger population, and increased availability of capital.In spite of the traditionally gloomy outlook for mobile business models in Africa, AfricaNext argues that 2009 is likely to be the start of greater things for the telecommunications sector. Broadband operators, equipment suppliers and investors may well find that 2009 presents an excellent opportunity for returns.In fact, it may be the most significant opportunity since the recent mobile voice boom, where mobile subscribers mushroomed over nine years from 2-million in 2000 to 270-million. And the tipping point could be as little as 12 months away.Far East investmentThe report also singles out Huawei Technologies as a major influence on future developments. The networking and telecommunications equipment supplier is the largest such company in the People’s Republic of China. Huawei has spent the last decade making substantial investments in Africa and is now a next-generation communications equipment supplier to more than 30 countries on the continent.With more than 2 000 employees, over 50% of whom are recruited locally, Huawei has set up training centres in Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt, Tunisia, and most recently, South Africa. Located in Woodmead, Johannesburg, the newest training facility opened in August 2008. A sixth training centre is under construction in Angola.Underwater technologiesA slew of new submarine cable developments will bring faster internet access to areas in Africa that were formerly deprived. East Africa, particularly, is the only region in the world that has no link to international communication networks, except through satellite communication. Because this technology is expensive, it has hindered business growth as well as development in vital areas such as education.West Africa has high-speed connectivity through the SAT-3 cable but this, too, has been more expensive than necessary because the consortium that controls SAT-3 has kept prices high.The East African Submarine Cable System (Eassy), the SEA Cable System (Seacom), and the East Africa Marine System (Teams) are all currently under construction.Seacom is planning to launch its cable in June 2009, just in time for the Fifa Confederations Cup, while Eassy is on track for completion by the time the long-awaited 2010 Fifa World Cup kicks off. Countries from South Africa all the way up to Sudan, as well as a number of land-locked countries, will benefit from fast and cheap bandwidth once the cables come into operation.Alcatel-Lucent, who control the Teams cable, have announced that laying of the cable should be complete before mid-2009. Teams will link the port city of Mombasa in Kenya to Fujairah in the United Arab Emirates.Other submarine cable developments include the Middle East North Africa project that will connect Egypt and a number of Middle East and Mediterranean countries, as well as Main One, which will link Portugal to South Africa with landing points along the continent’s west coast. The latter project will be implemented in two phases, both of which are scheduled for completion in May 2010.The West Africa Cable System will link Cape Town to the UK via at least 10 other countries. It was scheduled for completion in 2010 but reports are now hinting at 2011.Cutting edgeThe emergence of cutting-edge wireless technologies such as EVDO and WiMAX have also opened up internet access where cable-laying is impractical, says AfricaNext.Evolution Data Only/Evolution Data Optimized is a technology that allows users to connect wirelessly to the internet without having to be near a hotspot. The EVDO card provides instant and direct access, wherever the user may be at the time.WiMAX, or Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a powerful wireless access standard that provides broadband speed without the need for direct line-of-sight to a base station. Since it offers high bandwidth at a low cost, experts predict that WiMAX will become the dominating wireless broadband access standard in the next few years.Data gathered by AfricaNext shows that there were about 2.7-million broadband subscriptions at the end of 2007. Of these, 90% were located in Egypt, South Africa, Morocco, Nigeria, Algeria and Angola. The company now estimates that by the end of 2012 the number of subscriptions will have increased fourfold to 12.7-million.In terms of general internet use, the African continent had between 45-million and 55-million users at the end of 2007. This represents just 3% of the world’s total and a 5% penetration of the population. AfricaNext projects that this number will reach over 100-million by 2012.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related storiesBetter broadband for AfricaEASSy undersea cable on trackUseful linksHuawei in AfricaAfricaNextTelkomNeotelEVDOWiMAXlast_img read more

Read More
CATEGORIES:

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The final week of the spring 2017 edition of Feeding Farmers took the Ohio Ag Net crew to far western Ohio to the Michaud Farm. Dale Minyo sits down with Jesse Michaud about the farm, his son’s roles, and an impressive collection of old signs from yesteryear. All that and more in this interview, courtesy of AgriGold.last_img

Read More
CATEGORIES:

first_imgAt this year’s SXSW Conference, the future of virtual reality and virtual cinema is on full display in “Beethoven’s Fifth.”All images via Beethoven’s Fifth.In 1977, the Voyager spacecraft departed for the deepest reaches of outer space, carrying two golden records that contained sounds and images representing the diversity of humanity’s greatest achievements. Now, 40 years later, we chat with Jessica Brillhart about her ambitious Virtual Cinema VR project, which combines the experience of Voyager’s journey with a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 as part of a collaboration between Google Daydream, the Philharmonia Orchestra in London, NASA, and NASA JPL.For those curious about the bold new frontiers of virtual reality (and virtual cinema), Brillhart shares how they’ve worked to push their VR project to new limits.Finding the Right RigIn terms of production, there’s a lot there! — so it all depends on what you’re going for. I started my career in VR being more focused on stereoscopic, cinematic VR, where the visitor to the experience remains stationary and she can look up, down, and all around her. This is a bit of your run-of-the-mill kind of VR content, and there are a lot of VR rigs out there that can do a decent job.Brillhart and her team used the GoPro Odyssey, which is part of the Google Jump ecosystem. Brillhart is a certified expert with the Jump, as she helped develop the system with Google. She is quick to note that “nothing is necessarily perfect though.” She’s found the most success when she can recognize limitations and then find creative workarounds for live-action VR rigs and headsets.Tilting the RigCreators in this space used to say it’s important to keep a VR rig completely level and flat relative to the ground. It turns out that’s not the case. You can tilt the VR rig, and it actually feels a lot better if you do, so as long as the rig is intercepting an eye-line between two objects or people.In the case of Beethoven’s Fifth, Brillhart had their rig set at an angle to get a good eye-line between the standing conductor and the seated orchestra member. “When you turn in the direction of the player,” Brillhart explains, “it’s as if you’re the conductor looking down. When you turn in the opposite direction to look at the conductor, it’s as if you are the player looking up.”Focus on the “How” Not the “What”Beethoven’s Fifth isn’t about Beethoven’s Fifth. It’s a bit of a throw, actually. We tend to focus so much on the thing instead of the experience of the thing, and as VR is an experiential medium, I wanted to push for that more. The experience became about hearing. How we hear, what happens to us when we can’t hear, what are other ways to use sound and audio to understand something?To stand out in a crowded (and very inspiring) SXSW Virtual Cinema lineup, projects like Brillhart’s need to bring something both experimental and experiential to the table. Beethoven’s Fifth, among many other things, also experimented with something Brillhart calls “movement parsing,” which is “a way that deaf people see the world, as the brain tends to reshape itself when one perceptual ability is lost.”Aim for an Immersive ExperienceThe worst thing that could happen when someone is floating in the depths of space in VR is to hear a cough, sneeze, laugh, or the general noisy buzz of the real world. We wanted to make sure we provided the best experience for folks coming into Beethoven’s Fifth. Should visitors need headphones, we’ve got the best ones for the job.“Immersive,” is another word often thrown around in the VR world. The Beethoven’s Fifth experience benefits from Bose noise-cancelling headphones, which Brillhart chose as the best way to combat the huge amount of room and crowd noise in a busy SXSW Conference lobby.Think Outside the HeadsetGetting into VR and out of it are both part of the overall experience. There’s an art to designing that kind of flow. Generally what we’ve seen is installs where visitors get strapped into a headset, put on a swivel chair, and asked to “immerse themselves.” Bit of a stretch, honestly.Perhaps the most notable aspect of Beethoven’s Fifth is their cylinder projection system, designed by Igloo Vision to provide a different kind of flow for an audience. The outside was designed to be a “contextual layer with images and writings about the Golden Record,” while the inside is a “staring state that provides context for the experience.”VR Is for EveryoneBeethoven was not in the best state when he wrote his Fifth Symphony, in large part because was going deaf at the time (if not already deep into deafness at that point). He had a very hard time hearing his own music. He’d rely on the vibrations of his “banging” on his piano in order to get a better sense of what it was he was writing. Apparently he went through quite a few pianos in the process.Beethoven’s Fifth really took a lot of inspiration from what its composer was going through, so Brillhart asked, “what could a VR experience do for Beethoven or those with similar afflictions?” The project is meant to transcend understanding and connect experiencers with something deeper, which is at the heart of virtual reality.Bring Content and Hardware TogetherThe Golden Record was part content and part hardware, both working together to accomplish a very large, seemingly impossible goal. Though that wasn’t the original intent, Beethoven’s Fifth became an homage to that, too. We have an array of hardware — from Daydream, Bose, Sub-Pac, Igloo, Mixed Immersion’s speaker system. We also have the Beethoven’s Fifth experience — an amazing performance by the Philharmonia Orchestra in London, Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting, a breathtaking visualization of moving into interstellar space, and an incredible sound mix that ties it all together.When talking about her project, Brillhart often mentions the many “layers” to the experience. It’s complicated to explain in an early phone interview; it’s just something that has to be experienced. Much like Voyager’s journey, or Beethoven’s masterpiece, true art is built to last and transcend, and for anyone working in the space, Beethoven’s Fifth is a great example of not only what that journey actually looks and sounds like but, more importantly, what it feels like.For SXSW coverage, check out some of these articles:SXSW Discussions: 7 Tips on How to Develop a Digital DocuseriesTips from SXSW: Filming with Your Camera in MotionSXSW Talks: The 7 Key Factors to Revamping Decades of Codelast_img read more

Read More