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first_img SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=a7617b59&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=128&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=a7617b59&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> Alex Buttigieg / Motorsports Events PhotographyAlex Buttigieg / Motorsports Events Photography More than 80 drag racing cars, motorcycles and dragsters competed in the second round of the Enemed National Drag Racing Championship organised by the Malta Drag Racing Association at their raceway in Ħal Far between Friday 3rd and Sunday 5th May.Most drivers who did not have accidents or damage to their vehicles improved their personal best time.Among the many success stories, Chantelle Zammit did a 10.82-second run in her Escort MK1 Pinto powered car prepared by Mark Farrugia. Farrugia Renald on his Mitsubishi FTO broke a world record at 8.422 seconds at speeds of 177.33 miles per hour, a record for a Mitsubishi FTO without wheelie bar.Matthew Carabott, a driver of Mr Whippy Racing team ran the quarter-mile strip in 5.84 seconds at a speed of 234 miles per hour. This round also served as training for the Mr Whippy racing team, as at the end of the month they will debut at Santa Pod Raceway in London.The Bracket classes were won by Mario Camenzuli, Semira Galea, Lesley Portelli, Michael Caruana, Emilio Vassallo, Godfrey Mallia, Clinton Degiorgio, Glenn Caruana, Marvic Galea, Jesmond Mallia and Paul Ciantar. Index Classes have been won by Clive Zammit, Michael Caruana and Semira Galea.The Motorcycle SS1 class and Open Class were won by Luke Farrugia and Briegel Micallef respectively. Open Class 1, 2 and 3 were won by Paul Fenech, George Zarb and Patrick Scerri. D4 and D5 classes were won by Reuben Scicluna and Antoine Schembri. Open Front Wheel Drive and Front Wheel Drive Outlaw were won by Marvic Galea and Farrugia Renald. Garry Camilleri won the Extreme 2 Class. Louis Vella won the Open 6 Class while Christian Pace won Escort Class 2 and Escort Class 3.The next round – the 3rd round of the Enemed National Drag Racing Championship – will be held on the nights of the 11th, 12th and 13th July, at the Ħal Far Raceway.WhatsApplast_img read more

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first_imgShareNEWS RELEASEDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduThe birth of ‘infrastructural citizenship’ in the United StatesHOUSTON – (Nov. 2, 2015) – In one of the first case studies to examine how neighborhoods with different racial and economic makeups dealt with similar, unpopular highway construction projects in the 1970s, a researcher at Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research found that affluent whites and working class blacks in two Houston neighborhoods used remarkably similar methods of political activism to lobby against the proposed changes to their communities.Workers rebuild gates in Courtlandt with the highway spur in the background. Image courtesy Houston Metropolitan Research Center“There was a specific and recognizable brand of activism that developed independently in these diverse communities that I identify as ‘infrastructural citizenship,’” said study author Kyle Shelton, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Kinder Institute. “This brand of 1970s activism was encouraged by federal environmental laws, public meeting requirements, political representation and a growing interest in how cities could be shaped to facilitate new forms of urban living.”The paper, “Building a Better Houston: Highways, Neighborhoods and Infrastructural Citizenship,” was published in the Journal of Urban History. Shelton looked closely at how the white and wealthy residents of Courtlandt Place in Houston’s Montrose area and the predominately black and mostly lower-income residents of the city’s Third Ward responded to two disruptive highway projects in the 1970s.“The negative impacts of highway construction, particularly for African-American communities, in many American cities have been well-established,” Shelton said. “What I wanted to do was add to that by also showing how other communities within central cities dealt with infrastructure and how residents of different racial and economic backgrounds dealt with and thought about either protesting or attempting to change the infrastructural outcomes that were occurring.”Courtlandt Place was confronted with the construction of the 527 Highway Spur and the transition from a once elite, single-family neighborhood to a community dotted with multifamily dwellings and commercialization. The Third Ward had to deal with the widening of Interstate 45. The initial construction of I-45 had already damaged a segment of the community. In the 1970s the highway department aimed to widen the road to ease suburban commutes.“The scale and nature of the threats to the two communities were different, but the actions of residents were strikingly similar,” Shelton said. “To resist highway construction and its aftereffects, residents from both communities embraced a rhetoric and set of actions that turned their homes and streets into political tools.”During the infrastructural debates, residents staged protests, wrote letters and attended countless public meetings, according to Shelton. They organized historic preservation campaigns, lobbied city officials and paid for independent planning efforts. They argued that their homes and local streets should be held in the same esteem as regional roadways and downtown redevelopments. With each action, the residents used infrastructural debates to assert their rights as citizens and worked to change the civic decision-making process.“The scale and nature of the threats to the two communities were different, but the actions of residents were strikingly similar,” Shelton said.While the two sets of Houstonian neighborhoods shared a common desire to protect their communities and followed common strategies, Courtlandters and Third-Warders experienced far different starting points and results.“It is undeniable that the efficacy of activism was inherently circumscribed by the class and race of those who employed it,” Shelton said. “The residents of Courtlandt Place, who were wealthy, politically connected and white, had an easier time of broadcasting and implementing demands than the poorer, black residents of Houston’s Third Ward.”Shelton points out the construction problems Courtlandt residents faced were far less disruptive than those confronting the Third Ward.“While imbalances in racial and economic power of the two sets of actors involved definitively shaped the outcomes of the fights in the two neighborhoods, the common language and action residents claimed through assertions of infrastructural citizenship allowed them to attempt to protect their communities and to participate in the planning of the city’s future,” Shelton said.Ultimately, the Courtlandt residents possessed the economic means to purchase their street from the city of Houston and provide for its upkeep. They also possessed the time, expertise and resources that allowed them to successfully pursue the creation of a historic district. In the end, Courtlandters lost their front gate. In contrast, road construction disrupted the Third Ward twice within a decade, dispersing residents, sapping resources and disrupting community organization that might have fought the new roadway, which was built.“The omission of infrastructural debates from our shared political consciousness belies the importance of these fights to determining the shape of our cities,” Shelton said. “I challenge the notion that infrastructural debates are a minor aspect of urban politics and life. Instead, I argue that since World War II, opposition to the planning, construction and use of infrastructural networks has been among the more contentious and formative debates within our cities and will remain so as our cities continue to evolve.”Shelton has also written “How Communities Leverage the Power of ‘infrastructural citizenship’” for the Kinder Institute’s Urban Edge blog.For more information, receive the study or to schedule an interview with Shelton, contact David Ruth, director of national media relations, at 713-348-6327 or david@rice.edu.Rice University has a VideoLink ReadyCam TV interview studio. ReadyCam is capable of transmitting broadcast-quality standard-definition and high-definition video directly to all news media organizations around the world 24/7.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6.3-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here. AddThislast_img read more

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