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first_imgDONEGALDAILY.COM has been given incredible new details on a scam in which dozens of Donegal people were conned.A number of investors are due to meet with our investigators later this morning – and we hope to give an up-to-date story to readers later this afternoon.The investigation relates to a foreign national and how he sucked dozens of local people into a bogus get-rich-quick scheme. He used well-known salespeople to trick unsuspecting investors out of MILLIONS OF EURO.The smooth-talking crook boasted about how he could beat the bankers by promising fantastic returns on cash deposits.He said his solution to low returns from the banks was to invest in liquidated stock and re-sell those stocks at huge profits.But it was all a scam – and now it’s being investigated by Gardai, the Criminal Assets Bureau and the Revenue Commissioners….as well as up to six other police forces. A new update will appear later today.* If you were an investor, contact us by email on info@donegaldaily.com in complete confidence.BREAKING NEWS: DONEGAL INVESTMENT SCAM UPDATE was last modified: December 15th, 2010 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgIn her inimitable way, Science reporter Elizabeth Pennisi has once again portrayed a scientific controversy undergoing active ferment.  This time it’s about the evolutionary origin of cell nuclei, which she terms “specialized, DNA-filled command centers.”1  At the conclusion, she gives prominence to a “provocative, but circumstantial and controversial” suggestion that viruses taught cells how to wrap their DNA in double membranes with controlled access.  Since the idea presupposes that viruses preceded all three domains of life – prokarya, eukarya and archaea – “If this is true, then we are all basically descended from viruses,” as a believer puts it.  The idea is unpalatable to some.  “I do not believe [it],” a German molecular biologist retorts.  “The idea of the viruses ‘inventing’ [eukaryotic cells] from scratch is hard for me to conceive.”    Pennisi treats the new viral theory as tentative at best.  What’s more revealing in her article are the problems with previously-popular ideas, and why.  According to her, the key insight at a meeting in France last month on the subject was: “They had underestimated the complexity of the eukaryotic cell’s 1.5-billion-year-old precursor.  The data presented indicated that this ancestral cell had more genes, more structures, and more diverse biochemical processes than previously imagined.”  For a glimpse why, look at Pennisi’s brief description of the nucleus:Each nucleus in a eukaryotic cell consists of a double lipid-based membrane punctuated by thousands of sophisticated protein complexes called nuclear pores, which control molecular traffic in and out of the organelle.  Inside, polymerases and other specialized enzymes transfer DNA’s protein-coding message to RNA.  Other proteins modify the strands of RNA to ensure that they bring an accurate message to the ribosomes outside the nucleus.  The nucleus also contains a nucleolus, a tightly packed jumble of RNA and proteins that are modified and shipped out of the nucleus to build ribosomes.(For more on the nuclear pore complex, see 06/17/2002 and 01/18/2002 headlines.)Eukaryotes are distinguished from bacteria by their double-membrane nuclei.  “The nuclear distinction between prokaryotes and eukaryotes shaped early speculation about the development of complex life,” Pennisi says about ideas floating around up to the 1970s.  Some thought eukaryotes were evolved prokaryotes, and others thought prokaryotes were degenerate eukaryotes.  But then Carl Woese created new woes by identifying bacteria-like cells that were distinct from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes: so different, in fact, to warrant classification in their own domain – archaea.  Others soon were surprised to find that eukaryotes appeared to have genes from both bacteria and archaea.    So another story was born, the endosymbiont or merger hypothesis.  This proposed that eukaryotes arose from “the ancient symbiotic partnership between bacteria and archaea.”  That theory came under fire from the discovery of faint but distinct nuclei in an unusual group of bacteria, named planctomycetes, that live in soil and fresh water.  Some of these planctomycetes have organelles and double-membraned sacs of DNA and RNA.  According to a critic of the merger model, these observations “turn the dogma that ‘prokaryotes have no internal membranes’ upside down”  Now, it seems no one is sure which way is up.    There’s more to cause vertigo for evolutionists: the complexity of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs).  “Explaining these structures has always posed a sticking point for nuclear evolution.”  For one thing, “without pores, the nucleus can’t function.”  But for another thing, Pennisi continues, the same planctomycetes, and possibly some other archaea and prokaryotes, apparently possess structures resembling these complex traffic-control gates.  “Bacteria with nuclear pores and internal membranes, features typically considered eukaryote-specific, suggest that the nucleus was born much earlier than traditionally thought.”    For some, that leaves as the leading contender the controversial theory that viruses first invented the nucleus.  This, however, only pushes the complexity of nuclei and their pores farther back in time, and foists a huge design problem on earth’s most primitive biological entities.  That is why the molecular biologist quoted earlier can’t believe that simple viruses created such complex structures from scratch.  Pennisi shares a few speculations, based on circumstantial evidence, how it might have happened.  But when she ends by pushing the answer to the future, it underscores the fact that no current theory accounts for the origin of the nucleus:Did a virus provide the first nucleus?  Or was it something an early bacterial cell evolved, either on its own or in partnership with an archaeum?  To resolve the origin of the nucleus, evolutionary biologists are exploring new techniques that enable them to determine relationships of microorganisms that go much further back in time….The biologists in France argued and discussed many ideas.  “But when it came to accounting for how the nucleus was born,” Pennisi admits, “no single hypothesis bubbled to the top.”  She quotes French molecular biologist Patrick Forterre who said, “It’s like a puzzle.  People try to put all the pieces together, but we don’t know who is right or if there is still some crucial piece of information missing.”1Elizabeth Pennisi, “Evolutionary Biology: The Birth of the Nucleus,” Science, Vol 305, Issue 5685, 766-768, 6 August 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.305.5685.766].The crucial piece of missing information is information itself.  Information: DNA, logic, codes, controlled access, complex systems of integrated parts: these are all indicators of intelligent design.  This would be obvious if the biologists at that meeting would only think outside the Darwinian box in which they have imprisoned themselves.  Look at what contortions they have to go through to account for such biological complexity by chance.  As usual, the answer is somewhere out there in the future.  Also as usual, the same trend is seen here as in everything else in biology, and even in paleontology and cosmology: more complexity, further back toward the beginning.    Poor Elizabeth.  She has reported on so many of these evolutionist hand-wringing sessions you would think she might have taken up gardening by now to maintain her sanity.  But that might not help.  Just looking at the soil and thinking about those planctomycetes, and looking at the leaves and thinking about those nuclear pore complexes, DNA decoders accurately translating messages into specialized enzymes, all those shipping and receiving docks, and all the other thousands of sophisticated complexes working together in those command centers called nuclei might bring the stress and anxiety right back again.  “Come unto Me,” said the Designer, “all you who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”(Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province: The luxury Didima holiday resort in the Drakensberg range of mountains.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal province:Sugarcane Fields in the north coast region.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goat on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image KwaZulu-Natal Midlands: Dairy goats on Swissland Cheese Farm. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res imageCOUNTRYSIDE 23: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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first_imgBrand South Africa’s Play Your Part initiative was one of 34 Gold award winners at the Loeries this year. Here’s more on the award-winning radio ad and the current campaigns of Play Your Part.Sithembile Ntombela (right), Brand South Africa’s general manager of marketing, is pleased with the Loerie Gold award won for the Play Your Part radio ad. Here she is with Thobile Mushwana, a Play Your Part ambassador. (Images: Mathiba Molefe)Melissa JavanBrand South Africa’s Play Your Part won a Gold award at the Loeries this year, held at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre in Durban. The Loeries awards ceremonies were held on 19 and 20 August 2017 during Loeries Creative Week Durban.The Loeries are the marketing and advertising industry’s awards. They are an opportunity for brands and marketers to view the very best work coming out of the region. All countries from Africa and the Middle East may enter all the categories, but entries from outside South Africa are judged separately.The Media Update reported that more than 3,000 entries were received, with 20% of them from outside South Africa. A total of 800 brands were represented by 400 agencies from 18 countries in Africa and the Middle East.The awardsThere were more than 240 Loeries awarded in 22 categories, including five Grand Prix, 34 Golds, 24 CraftGolds, 73 Silvers, and 102 Bronzes.The special awards included Nathan Reddy of Grid Worldwide, who was inducted into the Loeries Hall of Fame. He is the first designer to receive this honour.Brand South Africa was entered in the Radio Communication: South African Non-English Radio Station Commercials category. Its agency, The Odd Number, won the Gold for the After Tears radio ad for Play Your Part.Listen to the advert (or read the subtitles) here:In the same category, The Odd Number won a Silver for its BBC Lifestyle campaign, Hell’s Kitchen – Mama, Mfundisi, for the Hell’s Kitchen initiative.Joe Public won a Silver award for its Back to School campaign for Jet, called Hand-me-downs – Is’khaftini, Is’cathulo, Isokisi.Runners-up in the category were DDB, which won a Bronze for the Medal Paints Inkanyamba campaign, as did I See A Different You for the self-promotion campaign, Wa hamba Nathi.Communication for niche audiencesLoeries CEO Andrew Human told Campaign Middle East that the Loeries focused on being a regional specialist show. “In our judging, our judges are guided to look for regional excellence, to look for regional relevance.“Often you might find that niche work that may be overlooked in a global show, is what really comes out here and might get a strong award… We are looking for work in local languages that has a small cultural significance to the niche audience,” he said.“It doesn’t have to be a global campaign. It doesn’t have to make sense in London and in New York City. It can make sense in one city, in one country and region and we want to see how communication is being targeted to niche regional audiences.”The Q&APlay Your Part is a movement not a campaign, explained Sithembile Ntombela, Brand South Africa’s general manager of marketing. She was speaking at the media launch of the Play Your Part television series on 24 August 2017. “A campaign ends.“It is imperative to get South Africans to rally behind the Nation’s Brand. There are endless opportunities of getting involved and that is Play Your Part is a call to action programme that challenges every South African to play their part in their communities and contribute towards a positive social change.Sithembile NtombelaJournalist Melissa Javan spoke to Ntombela following the Gold Loerie win; she talked about what Play Your Part was currently doing:Melissa Javan: Congratulations on the Loerie win. How do you feel about it?Sithembile Ntombela: Ecstatic! Play Your Part was launched in 2011 with an objective of promoting active citizenship among citizens with a view that when we as a collective play our part, we will achieve what is set out in the country’s vision.After six years of hard work, receiving a gold award is a huge success and a key milestone for the organisation. This is also indicative of a hard working organisation, an organisation that continues to create a Nation Brand that inspires its people and is admired globally. Play Your Part affords us with a platform of bringing inspiration to life.MJ: What was the idea behind the radio ad?SN: The big idea was to show the reality of the consequences of driving after drinking alcohol. We believe that the number of road accidents continue to be on the rise and the campaign objective was really to activate the “rude awakening” of this reality.That is why the set of the ad is in heaven. If all citizens can play their part and promote responsible driving, the number of accidents can be reduced.MJ: Why was it specifically targeted at non-English speakers?SN: My view is that due to the lingo used, the ad lands itself naturally to a vernacular station. The plan is to get stakeholders to promote the ad and flight it on various platforms, including social media.MJ: Was it part of a campaign?SN: It was a tactical advert in support of the Arrive Alive campaign, which is often championed by the Department of Transport.MJ: How often does Brand South Africa do campaigns like these?SN: Brand South Africa works with and through various stakeholders and there are different collaborations that often take place. For example, there are the South African Premier Business Awards in collaboration with Proudly SA and the Department of Trade and Industry.However, this advert will be aired on different radio channels during the holiday season, with the objective of issuing a strong call to action.MJ: Can you name a few campaigns you are busy with now?SN: We are working with the Department of Trade and Industry on the South African Premier Business Awards. We are also busy with the Play Your Part TV series, which will start airing on 26 August 2017 on SABC 2, at 18h00.In addition, we are promoting the nation brand on international platforms through a partnership with CNN. We have an on-going media engagement to strengthen our relations with the media and get them to understand the nation brand performance.MJ: How important are the Loeries for South Africa?SN: Very important. They enhance the nation brand’s reputation and hopefully this can help in promoting the visibility of Brand South Africa. For me, the Loeries are a platform of celebrating creativity, talent and innovation. If a brand gets recognition at the Loeries, it enhances that brand’s reputation.MJ: Any final thoughts?SN: We will continue to work hard to ensure that the nation brand is recognised and that many South Africans can rally behind the brand and support Brand South Africa in advancing the long-term reputation and competitiveness of South Africa.Watch this year’s Loeries and the winners on its official site.Sources: Loeries, Campaign Middle East and Campaign Middle East, YouTube.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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first_imgAdvocate Barry Roux is representing Oscar Pistorius in his murder trial. (Image: Graphic by Mary Alexander. Background image courtesy of Jonny Ross, Flickr) • South Africa’s justice system • Oscar and the photo of the witness • Pistorius trial: open justice or trial by media? • A media guide to the Oscar Pistorius trial • The media and open justiceLucille DavieParalympian Oscar Pistorius, in court for allegedly murdering his girlfriend of four months, Reeva Steenkamp, on 14 February 2013, is represented by senior council Barry Roux.Roux, an advocate for more than 30 years, is a formidable legal eagle, known for wearing witnesses down. In Pistorius’s bail application in the weeks after the Steenkamp’s death, Roux grilled police detective, Hilton Botha, who cracked under relentless questioning, admitting that his facts were doubtful, and that Pistorius would not be a flight risk. Pistorius’s bail was secured at R1-million and Roux convinced the court to relax some of its strict bail conditions a month later.The first witness to be called in the Pistorius trial, Michelle Burger, took the stand for a day and a half, and withstood repeated grilling by Roux, bravely sticking to her story under pressure. Subsequent witnesses have endured his persistent questioning, with Pistorius’s former girlfriend, Samantha Taylor, breaking down in tears twice during her testimony, with the court having to have a recess to allow her to recover.Roux was admitted to the Bar in 1982. His practice comprises criminal, insurance, delictual, aviation, matrimonial, medical negligence, general contractual and liquidation work.He has had some high profile clients, defending South Africa-based businessman, Dave King, who had had the highest unpaid tax bill ever, at R2.3-billion. The bill was reduced to R700-million. Roux also represented Johannesburg Consolidated Investments chairman, Brett Kebble, now deceased, on charges of tax evasion. The charges were withdrawn in 2007.Mannie Witz, an advocate with the Bridge Group at the Johannesburg Bar, says of Roux: “He is a very experienced criminal lawyer, and quite a likeable fellow.” Witz says he has worked with Roux over the past 35 years. Roux has been a South African Police Services advocate for many years, and still takes on the bigger criminal cases for them. “He is very, very professional, and very competent,” adds Witz.Roux is a hardworking but private person, says Witz, and a gentleman and a family man. “He is always very well prepared, and a very decent guy.”Roux is a member of the Advocates Group 21, a professional body of 101 advocates who practise in the High Courts and other courts of South Africa and neighbouring countries.“Our members are committed to the highest standards of a professional and ethical legal practice, and are equally committed to transformation initiatives internally, and at the Johannesburg Bar, to ensure that the practice remains highly esteemed and legitimate,” indicates the organisation’s website.Members of the group practise in all the fields of law traditionally dealt with by advocates, including constitutional law and human rights, labour law, criminal law, matrimonial matters, banking law, company law, liquidations, aviation law and intellectual property. Services rendered include litigation, mediation and arbitration, attending enquiries and commissions, and appearing in all forums generally permitted by the rules of conduct set by the Bar, including as the presiding officials at hearings.“The Group has actively sought to transform the bar and to help redress the imbalances of the past. It has a dedicated fund aimed at ensuring that new and previously disadvantaged members get access to quality work and clients.”last_img read more

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