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first_imgAround 100 countries send their heads of armed forces to UN Headquarters to discuss strengthening of UN peacekeeping. (Photo UN PhotoManuel Elias)Brigadier-General Prince C. Johnson III, the Armed Forces of Liberia’s (AFL) Deputy Chief of Staff (DCOS), has described the just-ended Chiefs of Defense Conference as a great learning experience for Liberia.The 2017 Chiefs of Defense Conference, which brought together heads of about 100 countries’ armed forces, and held under the theme, “Meeting the Challenges,” took place at the United Nations headquarters in New York from July 6–8, 2017.Brig/Gen. Johnson and AFL Chief of Operations – Headquarters, Colonel Daniel Holman, represented Liberia.The conference also included the participation of military representatives from the African Union (AU), the European Union (EU) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as the Force Commanders of the UN peacekeeping missions in Mali (MINUSMA), Central African Republic (MINUSCA), South Sudan (UNMISS) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO).According to a dispatch from Liberia’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations, the conference, among other things, discussed issues surrounding the rapid deployment of troops, training, soldiers’ conduct, discipline and the need to increase the number of female peacekeepers, which is placed at approximately six percent.Liberia is currently contributing a company strength of 75 peacekeepers, including eight female personnel, to MINUSMA following its service as a platoon under the African-led International Support Mission to Mali (AFISMA).“We went under AFISMA serving as a platoon with Nigeria and Togo in June 2013. AFISMA was transformed to MINUSMA; and as of February 2017, Liberia has company strength of 75 personnel operating independently,” DOS Johnson explained.Johnson said experiences shared by other contributors especially Uganda, who has an all-female platoon in the DRC, will help Liberia, who recently rejoined the peacekeeping efforts after nearly 60 years to strengthen its peacekeeping capacity.He added that on the margins of the conference, he used the time to negotiate on behalf of Liberia and secured a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the United Nations that details the number and types of military personnel as well as equipment and logistical services that will be provided by the country’s armed forces.The AFL Deputy Chief of Staff said that it is a standard procedure that every contributing country including Liberia funds the deployment and upkeep of its soldiers including the provision of major logistical support and services and gets reimbursed.“We are not alone. Based on the new regulations of the UN, some changes have been done. Other countries are also negotiating their MOU. The UN has two agreements – the ‘dry lease’ and ‘wet lease.’ Liberia’s deployment is under a ‘wet lease’ agreement where we go independent and take care of our troops and then the UN reimburses us,” Johnson explained.He added that when the MOU is completed, it will state how Liberia will be reimbursed for major equipment, maintenance, troop deployment and welfare.Meanwhile, Johnson disclosed that more AFL personnel are eager to serve peacekeeping missions in accordance with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s quest “to give back”; but cannot do so now due to the terms of the negotiated MOU.“The motivation is high; the soldiers are eager; we are hopeful that after the signing of the MOU, we will be requesting an increment to a full company size of 150 peacekeepers. The military is about service, and the soldiers are ready to serve. It is just that our MOU gives us a set number,” he noted.Meanwhile, Liberia’s permanent representative to the UN, Amb. Lewis G. Brown, met with Brig/Gen. Johnson during a visit to Liberia’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations on Tuesday, July 11, 2017. On behalf of his colleagues, Johnson thanked Amb. Brown and staff for all the support during the MOU negotiation process.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The Grande Prairie Municipal Traffic Unit conducted a traffic operation with a focus on distracted driving and occupant restraints.During a traffic operation on November 6, RCMP say a total of 30 charges were laid.According to RCMP, previously, the unit conducted similar operations on September 13 and October 1 both resulting in over 20 charges laid on each date.- Advertisement -Drivers are being reminded that the current specified penalty for a distracted driving offence is $287.00 in addition to three demerit points applied on the date of conviction.Current legislation dictates that 15 or more accumulated demerit points, or eight for a Novice/GDL driver, within a period of two years will result in a licence suspension.Grande Prairie RCMP are asking the public to contribute to safer roads in their community by modelling safe driving behaviours.Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – Three members of the WSVN family were nominated and honored at the CCNN Media Awards over the weekend.7News’ Lorena Estrada, Rebecca Vargas and Diana Diaz each received nominations for the award show, hosted by Christopher Columbus High School’s Emmy award-winning student news network and Our Lady of Lourdes Academy.Lorena and Diana took home wins for Best General Assignment Reporter and Best News Anchor.The event, in its fifth year, draws more than 300 guests to include TV personalities, media executives and Columbus alumni and family members.The student bodies of both Columbus and Lourdes Academy vote on the winners.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email By Michael AllenNov. 28, 2018 , 2:10 PM When a peacock catches the attention of a female, he doesn’t just turn her head—he makes it vibrate. That’s the surprising conclusion of a new study, which finds that a male peafowl’s tail feathers create low-frequency sounds that cause feathers on the females’ heads to quiver.The finding is “fascinating,” says Richard Prum, an evolutionary ornithologist at Yale University who was not involved with the work. As far as he knows, it’s the first demonstration that feathers respond to acoustic communication signals from other birds.Scientists have long known that a bird’s feathers can sense vibrations. Much like a rodent’s whiskers, they are coupled to vibration-sensitive nerve cells, allowing them to sense their surroundings. Feathers can, for example, detect changes in airflow during flight, and some seabirds even use feathers on their heads to feel their way through dark, underground crevices. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img When peacocks are ready to mate, they fan out their iridescent tail feathers (known as trains), before rushing at females, shaking those feathers to catch their attention.But when researchers discovered low-frequency sounds—which are inaudible to humans—coming from this “train rattle” several years back, no one knew how they worked. All they knew was that peahens perked up and paid attention to recordings of these “infrasounds,” even though they couldn’t see the males.To find out what was going on, Suzanne Kane, a biological physicist at Haverford College in Pennsylvania, and her colleagues decided to look at the feathered crest on top of the peafowls’ heads. During her previous research, she was struck by the resemblance between the short crest feathers—which form a sort of minifan—and the large peacock tail feathers.Kane and her colleagues gathered the intact head crests of 15 Indian peafowls (Pavo cristatus) and played recordings of the low-frequency sounds produced by the train rattle displays, along with white noise. Using high-speed cameras, they found that the train rattling infrasounds caused the head crests of both males and females to vibrate at their resonance frequency—the point at which they vibrate the strongest—whereas other sounds resulted in little to no movement.Peacocks also perform a wing-shaking display that Kane says isn’t particularly visually impressive—at least to humans—as it doesn’t involve the beautiful tail feathers. However, when the researchers used a mechanical arm to flap a peacock wing in a similar way near three head crests from female peafowl, they found that it caused measurable movements.“Every time there was a flap the crest vibrated,” Kane explains. This suggests the air flow generated by wing shaking could vibrate the feathers of nearby females, perhaps attracting their attention, the researchers report today in PLOS ONE.The team cautions that even with the new results, it still hasn’t looked at how female birds respond to these vibrations. Angela Freeman, a biologist at Cornell University who first discovered the low-frequency sounds, says her experiments showed recordings of these infrasounds cause both males and females to become alert and start walking and running, “presumably to locate the signal.”What scientists need to do next, she says, is figure out how the vibrations are coordinated with other parts of the mating display—and whether the sounds from the shaking tail feathers really do attract the females. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Watch a peacock get a female’s attention—by making her head vibratelast_img read more

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