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first_imgFor him Real Madrid it would not be anything strange to play at home in a stadium other than Santiago Bernabeu. The Whites have played six games exercising with local status in fields other than the Coliseum of the Castilian: two in the League and four others in European competitions. In the league we must go back to 1982 when the whites played against Las palmas (1-0, goal of Camacho) at Rico Pérez from Alicante. It was disputed there due to a series of incidents that had occurred on the occasion of a Classic: García de Loza, collegiate of the match, did not want to point out a clear penalty Gerardo to Isidro in the 7th minute. In addition, in the second half, he sent off the Real Madrid Bonet and Metgod. At the end of the match, a rain of pads fell on the field. After the game, the referee explained: “It was not a penalty. If you see that it was a penalty on television, I cut my head off.” And … Yes. Television showed that there had been maximum penalty. García de Loza tried to rectify saying that he could not call a penalty so early in such an important match: he went three months without refereeing …The second time was in 1994. It was the debut of Vicente del Bosque on the Madrid bench. It was on day 28 of the league championship 1993-94. The whites defeated the Lightning at Calderón 5-2 in one of the last exhibitions of Prosinecki. The white coliseum was closed for a meeting when it received an orange ball Francisco Álvarez de la Cruz, line judge, during a Madrid-Tenerife (0-3) of the Copa del Rey. Europe. However, it has been in European competitions where Madrid has had to play more matches at home in distant stadiums. The first time was in the European Cup 1976-77. The altercations that occurred before the Bayern in the 1976 semifinals (a spectator jumped and assaulted Müller and to the referee Linemayr) ended that Madrid should play two games away from the Bernabéu. This is how he played against Stal Mielec at Luis Casanova from Valencia (1-0, Pirri) and before the Witches Belgian in The Rose Garden (0-0).The third time was in 1987. The Whites had to play against him Port again in Valencia (2-1), due to incidents in the 1987 semifinals, where Pfaff, goal of the Bavarian team, suffered a rain of objects. UEFA sanctioned Madrid by playing an empty game (Naples) and another far from Madrid. The Portuguese were measured in the Valencian countryside.The last time was in Seville, and as champion of Europe in 1998. After the scandal of the fallen goal against the Dortmund, had to play a game away from Madrid. He traveled to the Seville capital, to Sánchez Pizjuán, where he beat Inter Milan (2-0).last_img read more

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first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt’s been just two wins, but University of Santo Tomas’ late season success is slowly changing the Golden Tigresses’ story in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament.UST had an abysmal stretch in the middle of its schedule when it lost five straight games, an unprecedented streak in the school’s history, that almost stripped the Golden Tigresses of their contender status.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims James scores 37, Cavs beat Nets for 5th straight win Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ The Golden Tigresses have corrected their mistakes and their four-set win over National University, 22-25, 25-23, 25-21, 25-9,on Sunday saw their record go up to 4-7 while keeping them in the hunt fort a Final Four spot.And with two consecutive wins, UST captain Cherry Rondina couldn’t help but wonder why they weren’t able to win games earlier in the season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“I was thinking earlier that why weren’t we able to do this in the first round,” said Rondina in Filipino. “Although this win over NU will really help us individually as we head on to face stronger opponents.”“I know that everything happens for a reason so we just have to deal with the earlier losses, it’s just sad that we’ve just experienced winning this late in the season.” MOST READ The Golden Tigresses are still in sixth place in the standings and are two games behind the 6-5 Lady Bulldogs but Rondina knows their win over NU didn’t just help them in the standings.“We know that we can beat the strong teams and we won’t ever underestimate ourselves because we can win against those teams that are better than us,” said Rondina, who had 25 points.“This win really helped with our confidence, I hope this continues.”ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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first_img“I think it’s a time in our culture when people love to pretend they’re offended.” That reaction by Simpsons creator Matt Groening’s to Hari Kondabalu’s 2017 documentary, The Problem With Apu, not only reduces a complicated conversation around representation and appropriation to a comically overused cliché, but also serves to invalidate any slight or stereotype that is part and parcel of the South Asian immigrant experience. As a resident Indian who spent his formative college years in the United States, I have difficulty empathizing with Groening, as my experiences mirror those voiced by Hari Kondabalu, Kal Penn and Aziz Ansari. From inviting guests over only to hear playful jabs about how the house smells like “curry,” to getting asked whether Halloween came early when dressing up for Diwali, cultural faux pas, whether intentional or unintentional, have followed us wherever we go.As an ardent fan of The Simpsons, I have shared a love-and-hate relationship with the beloved, Bengal-born Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, relishing his importance to the show while simultaneously agonizing over the cultural tropes in much the same way that Kondabalu describes.Despite the seemingly endless Twitter wars over Apu’s relevance, the most interesting response to this controversy came from Soutik Biswas who recently penned a piece titled “Not all Indians think Apu is a racist stereotype” for the BBC. In it, Biswas takes us through the diverging responses to Apu’s character, but what strikes me most is the nebulous distinction he makes between Indian Americans and the residents of “Apu’s native land.” Indian fans of The Simpsons in the homeland, he argues, seem to have no problem with Apu’s character. While Indians and Indian Americans are not monoliths by any stretch of the imagination, there are notable differences in the ways in which the two diverse groups have responded to The Problem With Apu. Biswas quotes several prominent Indian elites, including the founder editor of the Wire, who feels Apu represents a unique element of the Indian American diaspora. A cursory glance through Indian Twitter demonstrates mainstream support for such views: “Are there actually Indian people who find #Apu offensive? The guy was the first Indian I saw on my TV set and one of the funniest in the show. #KeepApu.”When I broached this topic with friends and strangers in Delhi, the most common responses ranged from Groening’s “people love being offended” to “is this really what we should be arguing about?” In other words, Mr. Biswas is correct — there is very little outrage coming from the homeland.And yet, this is entirely predictable. There is nothing surprising about a muted reaction from Indians when compared to the online outrage of a vast section of Indian Americans. Remember Avril Lavigne’s Hello Kitty? The response among Japanese Americans to the video was virtually the polar opposite of folks residing in Japan. We cannot divorce the discourse around cultural representation or appropriation from the context in which it takes place. The context here is the Indian immigrant experience in America. Indian Americans constitute 1 percent of the U.S. population and are found at all levels of American society, from CEOs to astronauts, taxi drivers to restaurant owners. When such a heterogeneous population gets whittled down to a harmless, head-bobbing caricature and proud owner of a Kwik-E-Mart however, we suddenly reduce this vibrant diversity into a single stereotype.This isn’t readily apparent when you’re thousands of miles away and part of the majority culture. It was not till I landed in the land of the free and home of the brave that I became acutely aware of my identity as an Indian foreigner. It was not till I was escorted by an abrasive Customs and Border Patrol officer to a separate room for further questioning that I became aware of what it means to be brown in America.When I tried to have this conversation with friends back home however, I was usually met with “well, what did you expect” or “you’re being dramatic.” Perhaps, but this doesn’t change a few fundamental facts about the differences between the Indian and Indian American experiences.You are never going to be mocked for your head bob in India. You are never going to be ridiculed for the scent of dal tadka and jeera rice in your lunchbox in India. These VIP experiences are reserved for the privileged immigrants who manage to make it to America’s shores. We put up with it because we believe it is the price we have to pay for entry. As a minority, race underpins every encounter you have in America, even for the more privileged immigrant groups. Some are benign, while others may end up costing you your life. In this context, representation matters. What you see on screen can wield a powerful influence on how you perceive entire communities. Having Indian Americans such as Mindy Kaling, Kal Penn, Hari Kondabalu, and Hasan Minhaj get the screen time they deserve represents the breadth of the immigrant experience far better than a caricature ever could.So, with all due respect to Mr. Groening, asking for better representation at the drawing board, in the fictional and real world, is not simply a matter of being offended. It is about not only recognizing, but actively celebrating and embracing the diversity that constitutes America. It is about understanding that having a White man voice a caricature of an Indian can do real damage to some communities. Hank Azaria clearly understands this, judging by his call for better representation and an unprecedented offer to step aside. It is time for us to shift the conversation away from the fractures between groups fighting for proper representation and instead focus on creating a more inclusive media for everyone. The fact that some Indians residing in India do not find Apu offensive does not invalidate the grievances of those Indian immigrants who have experienced America’s wonders and flaws firsthand. As we continue the conversation in the media and beyond, I hope we can bid adieu to stereotyped depictions tolerated in the America of yore, and embrace a more inclusive and accurate depictions of the vast, messy, beautiful diversity around us. To my good friend Mr. Nahasapeemapetilon, I say “thank you, come again!” Related ItemscultureSimpsonstelevisionlast_img read more

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