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first_imgThe Government of Liberia through the Ministry of Internal Affairs, in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has jointly signed a contribution agreement of Euro 4.5 million with the European Commission (EC) to promote decentralization in Liberia.The signing ceremony took place Monday at the Internal Affairs Ministry in Monrovia.The agreement targets decentralization, which is central to governance reforms, peace building and reconciliation as well as poverty reduction in line with Liberia’s National Policy on Decentralization and Local Governance and the Liberia Decentralization Implementation Plan (LDIP).The contribution from the European Union is part of Liberia’s five-year Decentralization Support Program (LDSP), funded by the Government of Liberia, EU, UNDP, and the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA).Speaking at the signing ceremony, Internal Affairs Minister Morris Dukuly said the amount will be used for decentralization in all parts of the country, describing it as service delivery.“This support came at the right time and it’s good because it represents a good start to the country’s development but the bad side about it is that so many of our people are dying from this deadly disease Ebola,” Minister Dukuly said.Minister Dukuly made it clear that the issue of the deadly disease Ebola would not stop the decentralization process in the country. He thanked the European Commission and other partners for their contributions in helping to develop the country.“I, therefore, hope that the pillars of decentralization will  be established expeditiously in all of the regions,” he said.Discussing the deadly disease Ebola, which is leaving several dead, he said the Liberian government is doing all it can to fight Ebola, especially by avoiding the traditional practices of burying dead bodies.At the same time Ambassador Attilio Pacifici, head of EU Delegation to Liberia, said the EU support to the Liberia’s decentralization Support programme is geared toward contributing to the development of Liberia so that all Liberians will have access to services and benefits from inclusive economic growth and participation in the political life of the country.The decentralization program focuses on administrative and fiscal governance by ensuring responsive, capable and countable local governments as well as developing and strengthening local level planning and monitoring and management capacity.Discussing the issue of Ebola in the country, Ambassador Pacifici said he is afraid that with all of the other support coming in for development, Ebola has also begun another challenge for Liberia.“Ebola will not change this country right now but we will change the country with all we can do to move this country forward,” he said.Ambassador Pacifici said the European Union is prepared to work together with the Liberian government through the decentralization and help fight Ebola in the country.For his part, Mr. Antonio Vigilante, UNDP Resident Representative, said the Euro 4.5 million is 50 percent of what the Liberian government needs to carry on its decentralization.He pledged his support to the Liberian government in terms of development and the fight against Ebola. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgHe was loved at Arsenal and dazzled everyone else, picking up the Football Writers award in 2002 and being named in three PFA teams of the year.“It’s difficult to pick out one or two highlights but he was superb in our double-winning season during the 2001/02 campaign and contributed hugely to our unbeaten season with 19 goals,” Wenger said of him.However, his time finished in disappointing fashion when the club lost the 2006 Champions League final and he was replaced after 20 minutes because of Jens Lehmann’s red card. At 32, Arsenal offered him a one year contract extension when he wanted more and he eventually joined Villarreal in 2006.REVEALED: The 25 greatest Premier League players everMore Arsenal Transfer GoldArsenal sign Torino striker in club record dealWhen Arsenal appalled the FA to sign striker for a transfer recordWhen Arsenal manager interrupted Celtic striker’s holiday to try and sign him Arsenal sign Robert Pires on 4 July, 2000 2 On 4 July, 2000, Arsenal spent £5m on Marseille’s Robert Pires and it was one of the best transfers the club have ever completed.Having arrived as World Cup and European Championship winner, his collection of medals continued to grow in north London during his six glorious years. He played 284 times, scored 84 goals and won the Premier League twice in addition to three FA Cups.But it could have been so different for the creative Ligue 1 star.“I would have preferred to have played for Real Madrid, but the words of Wenger gave me more security,” Pires explained upon his signing.The Spanish club were heavily linked with him, but the player was wary of not playing regularly in LaLiga and had seen what happened to compatriot Nicolas Anelka following his £22m move in 1999.“Nico was a signing of the president and did not fit in with the plans of the coach. My decision to sign for Arsenal was not just about money but also the opportunity to play,” he said, adding that he never actually spoke with Madrid boss Vicente Del Bosque, whereas he had been in constant communication with Wenger since December.He also revealed his admiration for what Wenger did for the careers of international team-mates, Thierry Henry, Patrick Vieira, Emmanuel Petit as well as Anelka. 2last_img read more

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first_img Source:https://www.dzne.de/en/news/public-relations/press-releases/press/alzheimers-in-mini-format-a-novel-tool-to-study-disease-mechanisms-and-possible-remedies/ Jul 3 2018Scientists in Dresden, Germany, have been successful in mimicking mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease in a novel, stem cell-based model system that reproduces features of human brain tissue. This experimental tool can be used to study mechanisms of pathology and help to find new therapeutic approaches, the researchers say. Their results, published in the journal Developmental Cell, indicate that modulating the immune system can trigger neuronal repair processes and thus possibly help the brain to better cope with Alzheimer’s. The study involved the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (IPF), the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden at the TU Dresden (CRTD) and further institutions from Germany and abroad.By using the new disease model, the researchers discovered an approach to instruct so-called stem cells to produce neurons. This kick-started repair processes. Experts call this phenomenon ‘neuronal regeneration’.”Neural stem cells are the progenitors of neurons. They occur naturally in the brain and as such they constitute a reservoir for new neurons. However, in Alzheimer’s neural stem cells lose this ability and therefore cannot replace neurons lost due to the disease,” explains Dr. Caghan Kizil, head of the current study and research group leader at the DZNE and the CRTD. “Our results suggest that modulating the immune system can unlock the potential of neural stem cells to build new neurons. These new cells foster regeneration and could possibly help the brain to better cope with the disease. This points to a potential approach to therapy, which we intend to further explore. If it will work out in humans, we cannot say at this stage. At present, this is still fundamental research.”Three-dimensional networksThe new disease model is based on human stem cells that are embedded in a polymer hydrogels. This soft and transparent biomaterial consists of the glycosaminoglycan heparin, the synthetic polymer poly(ethylene glycol) and various functional peptide units. The cell cultures are then grown in small culture wells of less than one milliliter volume. “The tunable polymer system allowed to combine effective molecular and physical signals that direct the cells to generate three-dimensional networks reminiscent of the neuronal webs of the human brain,” emphasizes Carsten Werner, director of the biomaterials program at IPF and professor of Biofunctional Polymer Materials at the CRTD. He points out that the current setup could be further miniaturized: “The size of the culture environment is hardly relevant. In principle, we could work with considerably smaller volumes.”Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predisposition”Other disease models based on human stem cells already exist. However, they are not suitable to address questions of our research on neuronal regeneration,” Kizil explains. “We are confident, that our system is unprecedented in several aspects such as the ability of stem cells to behave in a similar way as they do in the brain.”Thus, Kizil sees various applications: “Because of these properties, our model could be of use not only to study disease processes. I also see use in the pharmaceutical industry. Here, it could be applied in the early phase of drug development for the testing of chemical compounds.”Replication of pathological featuresWhen cells grown according to this culture method were exposed to ‘Amyloid-beta’, which are proteins involved in Alzheimer’s disease, typical pathological features developed. This included Amyloid-beta aggregates: the notorious ‘plaques’. Furthermore, the researchers observed deposits of Tau proteins within neurons, which are another hallmark of Alzheimer’s. Moreover, they found massive neuronal and synaptic damage. Yet, application of the immune system molecule ‘Interleukin-4’ induced neural stem cells to produce new neurons. This mitigated the detrimental effects triggered by Amyloid-beta.Basis for new therapies?”In the human brain, the immune response has diverse effects – both detrimental and beneficial. However, our results suggest that by modulating these mechanisms, we may combat Alzheimer’s disease,” Kizil says. “Interestingly, besides showing the beneficial effects of Interleukin-4, our data also indicate that this benefit is related to regulation of a metabolic product called Kynurenic acid. This is significant, because levels of Kynurenic acid are known to be elevated in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s. Thus, our model offers clues on how different players that are relevant for Alzheimer’s interact. In light of this, our model might help to pave the way for therapies based on neuronal regeneration.”last_img read more

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