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first_imgMOST READ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Nambatac also believes that the lack of support from the substitutes has been one of the factors why the Knights are failing to close out games down the stretch.“That’s really our problem. We always lack the finishing kick. And the lack of support is a factor because our opponents know that they have to tire us out,” he said. “For me, it’s a big thing if we can get two or three bench guys who can step up and help us, where we can get at least three to four minutes to rest.”Despite Letran’s struggles, Nambatac is keeping a positive attitude moving forward, trusting that the team and coach Jeff Napa will find a way to address this glaring issue in the games to come.“I’m positive that we’ll find a way to fix that problem. We’re down, but that shouldn’t be a reason why we should lose focus on our season. We’re struggling, but we use this as a motivation to find a way to get through this. The season is still long, so we know we have to work and double the effort for us to get back up,” he said.Letran springs back into action next Tuesday against Arellano.ADVERTISEMENT Rey Nambatac. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netRey Nambatac has pleaded for help from Letran’s bench players after the Knights side lost three of their first four games in NCAA Season 93.The latest blow was an 81-74 81-74 defeat to fierce rival San Beda where only six players from Letran contributed in scoring.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Kawhi Leonard, Clippers rally to beat Pelicans 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano ‘I’m out!’: PewDiePie releases last video before taking break from YouTube Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite LeBron James scores 31 points, Lakers beat Rockets For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Indian national gunned down in Camarines Sur NBA: Chauncey Billups was aware of Irving’s trade request while in interview with Cavs Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend “The opponents know that our bench is shallow compared to the other teams, so it’s easy for them to scout us because they know who’s going to contribute,” the senior guard said in Filipino on Tuesday.Most of the Knights’ offensive load have come from Nambatac, Bong Quinto, Jerrick Balanza, and JP Calvo, with big men Jeo Ambohot and Lance Vacaro churning out a few good games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’But that hasn’t been enough for Letran so far and Nambatac knows the team has to address that issue sooner than later.“Hopefully, we get three or four players from our bench to step up because it’s going to be difficult for us go-to guys to play without getting any rest. Come second round or the crucial games, maybe that’s when we can’t help our team because of fatigue, so we really need our bench,” he said. View commentslast_img read more

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first_imgSEATTLE – Warehouse retailer Costco Wholesale Corp. said Thursday its fiscal second-quarter profit dropped 16 percent, hurt in part by costs associated with revamping its consumer electronics return policy. Net income for the quarter ended Feb. 18 fell to $249.5 million, or 54 cents per share, from $296.2 million, or 62 cents per share a year ago. Last week, Costco announced a new return policy for consumer electronics devices including televisions, computers, cameras, camcorders, digital music players and cell phones. In the past, the company gave customers unlimited time to return those items, but the new policy shortens that window to 90 days. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In a conference call with investors Thursday, Costco Chief Financial Officer Richard Galanti said the company conducted a detailed review of when customers were returning items such as televisions, which he said bring in about $2.5 billion in revenue each years.last_img read more

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first_imgSpending the morning at a spa is my idea of hell. No mobile phone or coffee and someone touching my feet must qualify as some sort of breach of human rights.Sitting in the softly-lit relaxation suite wearing an oversized robe and slippers, I was a phone-less jittery mess.Outside was a real world and inside was this haven of beautifully scented rooms, pampering and tranquility. I had no place here. This was the new Voya Spa at Redcastle Oceanfront, Golf & Spa Hotel in Redcastle.These organic beauty products are entirely seaweed based and utilise the natural nutrients and benefits of the sea.I was about to experience my first spa massage treatment.Truthfully, I had always viewed spa treatments as a whole lot of faff never-mind the mystery of ‘spa etiquette’. I also may have needed a beauty overhaul before being allowed anywhere near a spa.What the hell was I suppose to wear, if anything, under my squishy robe?I sipped at the glass of sparkling water and stretched out on the comfy bed-seat.I think I was starting to chill out.The Relaxation Suite is a sumptuous large room with dim-lighting, the soft tinkling of a water feature and a choice of refreshing drinks. Everything to induce a state of relaxation was right in this room. It worked. It could easily host large birthday groups, friends’ spa days or other celebrations as well as the perfect spot for ‘me time’.My therapist, Áine, brought me to a treatment room where some paper pants (mystery solved) had been left for me. She left the room to allow me to change and relax on the massage bed.I had opted for the Voya Organic Luscious Salt Glow body treatment. (60 mins, €65).This is an all-over course body scrub followed by a shower and a relaxing massage. The salt scrub is infused with Dead Sea salts and Fucus Serratus Seaweed oil and the aroma is deeply invigorating. The Spa also offers a medium course scrub treatment.Áine deftly covered my body with this luscious concoction. It was a stimulating scrub and my skin was thoroughly but gently exfoliated. It is recommended for even the driest of skins.I then had a shower to remove the scrub. My skin texture was already incredibly soft and I hadn’t yet had the massage.Áine applied Voya body oil with a light pressure massage in sweeps and strokes along my body.This was a luxurious massage and very relaxing.I returned to the Relaxation Suite for a cooling drink before my Voya Express Organic Facial.My face was gently exfoliated followed by a double cleanse. Among the products Áine chose to use, were Maskerade, an anti-ageing face mask which helps to replenish skins moisture andMy Little Hero – Voya’s super serum.I left Redcastle with a great feeling of wellbeing and soft, velvety skin and a newfound appreciation that Spa treatment can be a little bit of heaven.Brenda O’Neill was a guest of the team at the Voya Spa at Redcastle Oceanfront, Golf & Spa Hotel.Redcastle Oceanfront, Golf & Spa HotelInishowen Peninsula, MovilleCounty DonegalTel: +353 (0) 74 938 5555Email: info@redcastlehotel.com Web: www.redcastlehoteldonegal.comwww.voya.ie , info@voya.ie and phone number +353 71 916 1872http://www.redcastlehoteldonegal.com/uploads/documents/Redcastle%20Hotel%20Spa%20Brochure%20Voya.pdfHEALTH & BEAUTY: A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN IN REDCASTLE was last modified: October 9th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Golf & Spa HotelInishowenredcastleRedcastle Oceanfrontspa dayVoyalast_img read more

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first_imgdave copeland 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App There’s trouble in CityVille. Six months after Zynga said it would decrease its reliance on Facebook for the bulk of its revenue, the publisher of the social network’s most popular games is still struggling. But Zynga’s problems run deeper than over-reliance on Facebook. For one thing, the two companies can’t even agree on the number of people playing games on the social network. Last month, Zynga told investors the tally shrank by 16% between April 1 and June 30. Facebook fired back, saying the number was keeping pace with overall user growth, jumping to 235 million in July, up from 205 million a year ago.There’s a bigger issue at play, however. Zynga still dominates the Facebook game market, having owned or developed six of the top 10 games in July. But those rankings mean nothing to Wall Street investors if Zynga can’t convert them into revenue growth.A lot has been made about Facebook’s move to diversify its own revenue stream by making easire for other developers to offer games. But some of Zynga’s biggest challenges cut to the core of the game maker itself. These are the most critical:(1) Zynga Needs Another HitIt’s telling that the standard description of Zynga in the business press refers to the company as “the maker of the popular Facebook game FarmVille.” Those journalists should be calling it the “once-popular Facebook game.”The number of monthly active Facebook users playing FarmVille peaked in June at 83 million. By the end of last year, it had plummeted to 33.9 million.(2) Facebook No Longer Promotes Games on Players’ WallsThat drop in monthly-active users is partly Facebook’s fault, according to William Volk, chief creative officer of the social media game developer PlayScreen. More than a year ago, Facebook changed the way apps could promote their offerings through posts made automatically to users’ walls.“While users may have disliked all the wall posts about the games, they made the cost of user acquisition lower than the lifetime value of users on that platform. Both Zynga and Facebook are feeling the after-effects of these changes,” Volk said. “It’s simply very expensive to promote Facebook games, even with the benefit of a large user base.”(3) Players Don’t PayZynga stuck with the freemium model when many other game makers went to the consumption model, making users pay for the time they spent playing. Volk doesn’t see the freemium model as a viable option going forward, and Zynga’s own numbers back him up: Fewer than 2% of players of all its games are paying customers.(4) Zynga Lacks an Effective Mobile StrategyBeing bigger won’t help Zynga as more eyeballs migrate to smartphones and tablets. Being small and nimble is often an advantage in the mobile game market, where some 250,000 games compete for attention.And Zynga’s one big chance to excel in mobile has become an afterthought. Zynga acquired the company that developed the mobile diversion Draw Something in April for $180 million, right when it peaked at 14.5 million daily users. Since then, Draw Something has steadily fallen in both popularity and potential. Related Posts 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…center_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Tags:#gaming#web 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

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first_imgWhether it’s spending time with devil worshipers or the angelic Mr. Rogers, editor Aaron Wickenden always finds a haunting and lovely truth in his work.We had a chance to speak with editor Aaron Wickenden about the scope of his work, what he finds inspiring, and collaborating with directors.PremiumBeat: Did Hail Satan?  director, Penny Lane, come into the edit bay with a conclusion of any sort? Or did you both find the story as you put together the edit?Aaron Wickenden: Well, one of the joys of working with Penny is that she is also an incredibly skilled editor. So, when she first contacted me about collaborating on this film, she had a twenty-minute demo that she had cut herself. That piece articulated many of the themes that my co-editor Amy Foote and I would go on to develop in the film. Penny’s demo succeeded in capturing my interest because it didn’t spring forth from conclusions but, instead, posed so many provocative questions, such as What does it mean to call yourself a modern day Satanist? What type of conflicts arise when the Satanic Temple redefines Satanism around tenants that any reasonable person could get behind? Like One should strive to act with compassion and empathy toward all creatures in accordance with reason. And, on an even more basic level What is religion and what is its function?So, on a hot summer day last year, I joined Penny and her producer Gabriel Sedgwick, at Amy’s Brooklyn edit studio for bagels and our first group mind-meld. They had already begun the editorial process. The challenge was figuring out how to dramatically balance the unfolding of these many questions. As an editor of unscripted films, I’ve discovered — through trial and error — that you never want to be giving the audience answers to questions they don’t have or (god forbid) exposition they don’t need. So, the primary goal is to develop and maintain your audience’s curiosity. That curiosity creates participation and investment. It becomes the engine for your film. Luckily on Hail Satan?, we also had an amazingly straightforward narrative throughline to organize our questions around — which was showing how a few people originally performing a prank became a serious world-wide religious movement.I left Brooklyn with a heavy hard drive in my luggage and headed back to my home office in Chicago, where I’ve cut the last few films I worked on. So, Amy and I were editing simultaneously using Adobe Premiere Pro. And with some After Effects support, that workflow turned out to be really easy for both of us.Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (Focus Features).PB: I watched Won’t You Be My Neighbor directly after viewing Leaving Neverland and was so grateful to be in Fred Rogers’s world! There is genuineness in the edit that reflects the subject. Meaning, I never felt manipulated emotionally. Was there a particular scene you felt was the heart of the film and most representative of Fred Rogers?AW: One of my favorite scenes is the ending of the film, which is actually very different from the ending we had for a long time. When I started on Won’t You Be My Neighbor, my co-editor — the brilliant Jeff Malmberg — had already cut a powerful ending that focused in on the idea of personal responsibility. Our director Morgan Neville was really interested in amplifying the idea that Fred Rogers wasn’t a saint (i.e. a person we could not also be like), and how important and empowering it was to think about the difference we can each make in our communities. As one of our storytellers says, “The question isn’t what would Fred Rogers do? The question is what are you going to do?” That was a profound “walk out idea” for the audience. So we lived with it in the cut for some time, and then set about to work on other parts of the film.Meanwhile, Morgan had done this beautiful exercise with all of his interviews where he asked people to take a silent, private minute to reflect on someone who had made a profound difference in their lives. It was a mirror of an exercise that Fred would do when he gave speeches on college campuses. So, editorially, we had some very loose sense that this content might get explored earlier in the film. We didn’t really know what that content might become.It was with that openness to possibility that Morgan asked producer Nicolas Ma and I to watch that footage one day. We screened each moment of reflection in entirety, one after another, which didn’t take very long because each reflection was only a minute long. Nevertheless, for me it was hard not to cry because it was so moving to watch people as they meditate on the idea of love, and recall the people who made the biggest difference in their lives.At the time, our composer Jonathan Kirkscey had already sent us a few temp music tracks to edit with, and one of them was this evocative and wistful piece called Trolly Music. Using that music as a binding element, we started grouping moments of reflection together in a flow that came together intuitively. First, we see Fred’s collaborators in reflection and watch their faces while hearing Fred lead this exercise himself. The film’s audience is encouraged to participate, as Fred directs us to all think about the people who “Smiled you into smiling, talked you into talking, sung you into singing, loved you into loving.” After a few moments, we hear our storytellers honor the people who made that profound difference in their lives. A storyteller then turns the question back to the director, and asks who he was thinking about? Morgan shares that he was thinking about his own mother. The two of them sit with this and acknowledge each other as having this profound common bond of love. Then, after a moment, we show the people who Fred loved deeply. His two sons and his wife, Joanne Rogers. Joanne ended her reflection saying, “Thank you.”It was a thank you to Morgan for honoring the legacy of Fred Rogers, it was a thank you for the opportunity to reflect on love, and it was a thank you to the audience of the film for spending some time thinking about the loving energy that flows through everyone and unites all things. It felt like a moment of grace and became the ending of the film.Generation Wealth (photo by Lauren Greenfield).PB: Generation Wealth is a stunning documentary, unique in that the filmmaker is also a character in the film. The doc explores obsession with wealth and opulence, yet the edit is very down to earth and intimate. The sequence that really struck me was when you linger on a push into the eyes of Suzanne, a hedge fund executive, which was bookended by still shots and a clever use of voiceover. It was very effective. What was the process you and Lauren Greenfield took when working on the film?AW: Generation Wealth was probably the hardest edit I’ve ever participated in. Lauren and I both like to tell the story about my first day on the job. When I walked into her studio, the wall was lined floor to ceiling with 3×5 cards. Normally, on any other film, those cards would have topics or story beats listed on them (and there would be 1/8th as many). But in this case, the cards simply had names of people that Lauren had interviewed for countless projects over her career. The goal was to weave two and a half decades of work into a single epic narrative. I was gobsmacked, but also thrilled to be working with a master filmmaker who was willing to take a major creative risk entering into uncharted waters.As a guide for the edit, we had a proof of concept demo in hand that Chad Beck had cut with Lauren, as well as a stellar written treatment that Lauren had developed with Keven McAlester. In both of those pieces, it was established that Lauren would be the primary guide through her corpus. The film would use Lauren’s work and voice to create a cinematic meditation on how the values of the “American Dream” have mutated over time.Generation Wealth could offer a way to connect the dots, but the challenge of connecting them was like a four dimensional Rubik’s cube. We were repurposing work that had not been designed to fit together, and Lauren’s previous work typically was ethnographic, and thus, did not include her as a character.Very early on, we started on the adventure of developing Lauren’s voice as a narrator and guide through the conceptual landscape. We had a mic setup in the edit room and once things got cooking, we would be recording VO nearly every day. We were writing and rewriting as we went. This went on for months because the visual materials could be assembled in so many different configurations. So, as an editor, I had to be incredibly agile and develop the skill to both see the infinite possibilities in the material and be ready to completely shift the edit at any moment. That’s really challenging. I remember explaining the process a bit to Breaking Bad editor Skip McDonald at an ACE event. He responded by saying something like, “I have no idea what you’re talking about.”So, it became clear to me pretty early on that in order to grapple with this type of expansive and generative storytelling experiment — on a reasonable deadline — we needed to bring in more editorial firepower. Michelle Witten (who is an editing genius) joined the team as a co-editor. And then, in the home stretch of the edit, the team expanded to also include Lauren’s frequent collaborators Victor Livingston and Dan Marks. Ultimately, we all worked very hard to hold space for ideas to spark and evolve into sublime moments of connection, like the one you mentioned with Suzanne. As a document, it’s a totally unique time capsule and I’m excited to see what people think of it in 20 years . . . provided we all live that long.They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead (Netflix).PB: Living with a subject during the length of cutting a documentary must be an emotional journey. What subject of your projects surprised you the most? Which subject moved you the most deeply?AW: As an editor of unscripted documentary features, I’m drawn to this particular spot in the creative non-fiction landscape because I love witnessing and shaping the stories of people brave enough to make themselves emotionally vulnerable. When you’re working with a director who understands this, then the entire process of editing is one in which we’re very emotionally engaged. For me, that’s a feature of the job and not a flaw. It’s certainly not for everyone, and I know editors who have moved far away from documentary because they crave structure. For me, I’d rather be working with a small band of passionate, brilliant storytellers, who have a great sense humor, and are jumping into the unknown by making a documentary film. I’ve been cutting now for about two decades, so it’s hard to identify what surprised or moved me the most out of all the work. That said, when I’m cutting a difficult scene, and it suddenly starts to unlock itself and go from a pile of fragments to something that almost feels electric in its coherence and completeness — it’s an overwhelming feeling. Sometimes, I have to get up and take a walk in that moment because we’ve just captured lightning in a bottle. I’ve wondered recently if other editors feel this way, too. It might also just be that I’m drinking too much coffee.Finding Vivian Maier (photo by Vivian Maier/Maloof Collection).PB: We all know documentaries take considerable time to come together. There is numerous footage to view and so many ways the film can be imagined. How do you find your projects? And, given the enormous commitment of time and energy, what factors into your choice to work on a film?AW: Projects come my way from all sorts of places. Maybe someone will read this article and have the perfect collaboration in mind and drop me a line via my website. Who knows?The most random way a film came to me was probably Finding Vivian Maier. The producer sent me a private message via Facebook to see if I was interested in talking about the film. The message went into my junk folder, and I didn’t see it for months. When I finally wrote him back, I was surprised they were still looking for an editor. That edit was very homespun, with the core team being just a few people. And ultimately, the film really connected with audiences and went on to be nominated for a BAFTA and Academy Award. So, I try to keep a door open for these types of scrappy projects to still come my way. At the same time, I’ve now built out relationships with many incredible directors who have great projects and the resources to get them made. And I enjoy collaborating when there is support structure in place to allow for our work to be as strong as possible.What I’m looking for in choosing a film changes a bit from project to project. Right now, I’m cutting a film from my home in Chicago for a director in Australia, and I love that. It means I can spend time around the edges of my day hanging out with my dog. That said, this edit has been a bit isolating, so on my next film, I’m looking to work more directly within a community. At the core, I think I’m always looking to collaborate with directors who have a strong artistic voice and have been drawn to a topic that they are uniquely well-suited to rub up against. In that charged space of friction — between director and subject — I’m looking to help make the sparks fly.Aaron WickendenCover image via Hail Satan? (Magnolia Pictures).Looking for more industry interviews? Check these out.Industry Interview: DJ Stipsen, DP of “What We Do in the Shadows”The Sun is Also a Star Film Composer Herdís StefánsdóttirIndustry Interview: Miles Hankins — The Composer Behind “Long Shot”Industry Interview: CW Costume Designer Catherine AshtonIndustry Interview: “Whiplash” Production Designer Melanie Joneslast_img read more

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first_imgIndia’s Vijender Singh on Friday beat Uzbekistan’s Abbos Atoev to win the gold medal in the 75 kg boxing event at the Asian Games in Guangzhou. Vijender won the bout 7-0. Vijender’s feat got India its second gold medal in boxing and 14th overall at Guangzhou.last_img

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first_imgPosted on August 31, 2010June 21, 2017By: Lorraine Thompson, Winner, Ashoka’s Maternal Health Blogging ContestClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On August 30 at 8:00am, the air was already hot and sticky as Ashoka’s Young Champions and Changemakers boarded an air-conditioned bus. After careening across Delhi’s bumpy streets, the young social entrepreneurs stepped into the bright light of downtown Delhi for their first day at the Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC).In the morning they attended the Conference’s inaugural ceremonies. After lunch they absorbed new facts, figures and findings at special conference sessions. Later that evening, I caught up with two Young Champions and a Changemaker to ask a question:What was your most important takeaway from today’s GMHC sessions? How will it impact your work?Onikepe Owolabi“At the first presentation today, I was struck by the obstetric epidemiologist from Aberdeen (Wendy J. Graham from Immpact at the Univeristy of Aberdeen). She kept mentioning context of research. And it struck me that when we look at studies to influence what we do, we should always try to find out about the culture of the people there. And the other things was her idea of ‘failing forward’: learning to maximize our failures—to make them into successes and leverage them for future successes.”“In the afternoon, I attended a session on the social and economic impacts on maternal health. There was a young man who spoke about a qualitative study done in Nepal. Because of what I heard in the morning, I was a lot more open to qualitative research. Sometimes people think it’s not as scientific as quantitative data collection. He spoke about the cultural things that stopped women from accessing healthcare. He kind of sparked a thought in my heart—that culture is an integral part of people’s lives.”“I think the aim of our Young Champion projects should be to eliminate the harmful practices of culture. But maybe we will get women to access healthcare better if we can incorporate some good parts of culture. From my cultural context, many people use traditional birth attendants because they want the love, the prayers and the social support. So maybe if we could somehow incorporate those spiritual rituals into hospital birthing and institutional deliveries, women would be more open to using them—as against just insisting that they come to the hospital.”Seth Cochran“The partner I work with in Uganda uses these birth kits. She goes around to different women in the villages and shows them a little backpack filled with things that will make a pregnancy safer. Really basic stuff. Like soap to wash your hands. A razor to cut the cord—a sterile razor. A clean blanket.”“Originally I thought, it was a great idea. But it turns out it’s a pretty controversial idea. A lot of people worry that if you give a woman this kit of clean stuff, it’s going to tell her it’s okay to give birth at home. And that’s not what the institutional players want. They want the women having their babies in hospitals. Which I think is ideal—but in a lot of cases not realistic.”“Since the Women Deliver Conference, I’ve been thinking I need to better understand this discussion. So today I went to a session on birth kits. It was structured almost like a debate. Like, Here are some of the facts: What do you think?”“And it became very clear to me what I want to do. With these birth kits, there are all these possibilities, right? It doesn’t have to be a facility birth. If you manage it properly, not only can it make a woman want to go to the hospital, it can help the hospital more effectively treat her. It’s a packaged set of commodities—and the facility may be short of commodities.”At the hospital, they know, if they’ve been trained, how to receive this woman: The woman comes with a little package, they can immediately take every thing out, do the job quicker, more effectively, make sure everything’s there.”“Today the debate made it very clear in my mind that I’m going to do this as a fundamental part of my program. The specifics of how—I’m not quite sure about yet. But my mind was boiling with possibilities: You could sell these things. You could sell vouchers for additional care. You could give them vouchers for local transport—negotiate with taxis. It’s a physical good, a package that’s not only sellable to the woman in Africa—or donate-able—but it’s also saleable to the donating public. Because it’s tangible. And it’s low cost—probably less than $10 or $15.”Dr. Minal Singh“I liked meeting people from the same field, with a similar cause. The best part was I’m coming away with the feeling that I’m not alone—I’m not facing different values in the field of maternal health. The values are shared by people all over the world. So it gives me lots of inspiration to work with new energy when I get back.”“There are so many synergies. Though we had little time to connect with all the partners, I’m sure we have their contact details and their organization names. Thanks to the World Wide Web, we’ll be able to connect again. I can see much potential—people from whom I can learn and partner.”“In the afternoon I attended a session on the social and economic and cultural implications of maternal health. It was a very nice talk. And this is actually the problem we are facing—the gap in India between the rural and the urban and also the economic gap. So I hope this will help me implement better.”Lorraine Thompson is the winner of the Ashoka’s Maternal Health Blogging Contest and is live blogging for the Change Summit and the Global Maternal health Conference. Stay up to date with the conference happenings! Follow the Maternal Health Task Force and EngenderHealth on Twitter: @MHTF and @EngenderHealth. The conference hashtag is #GMHC2010.For more posts about the Global Maternal Health Conference, click here.For the live stream schedule, click here.Check back soon for the archived videos of the conference presentations. Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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