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first_imgAround 100 countries send their heads of armed forces to UN Headquarters to discuss strengthening of UN peacekeeping. (Photo UN PhotoManuel Elias)Brigadier-General Prince C. Johnson III, the Armed Forces of Liberia’s (AFL) Deputy Chief of Staff (DCOS), has described the just-ended Chiefs of Defense Conference as a great learning experience for Liberia.The 2017 Chiefs of Defense Conference, which brought together heads of about 100 countries’ armed forces, and held under the theme, “Meeting the Challenges,” took place at the United Nations headquarters in New York from July 6–8, 2017.Brig/Gen. Johnson and AFL Chief of Operations – Headquarters, Colonel Daniel Holman, represented Liberia.The conference also included the participation of military representatives from the African Union (AU), the European Union (EU) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as the Force Commanders of the UN peacekeeping missions in Mali (MINUSMA), Central African Republic (MINUSCA), South Sudan (UNMISS) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO).According to a dispatch from Liberia’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations, the conference, among other things, discussed issues surrounding the rapid deployment of troops, training, soldiers’ conduct, discipline and the need to increase the number of female peacekeepers, which is placed at approximately six percent.Liberia is currently contributing a company strength of 75 peacekeepers, including eight female personnel, to MINUSMA following its service as a platoon under the African-led International Support Mission to Mali (AFISMA).“We went under AFISMA serving as a platoon with Nigeria and Togo in June 2013. AFISMA was transformed to MINUSMA; and as of February 2017, Liberia has company strength of 75 personnel operating independently,” DOS Johnson explained.Johnson said experiences shared by other contributors especially Uganda, who has an all-female platoon in the DRC, will help Liberia, who recently rejoined the peacekeeping efforts after nearly 60 years to strengthen its peacekeeping capacity.He added that on the margins of the conference, he used the time to negotiate on behalf of Liberia and secured a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the United Nations that details the number and types of military personnel as well as equipment and logistical services that will be provided by the country’s armed forces.The AFL Deputy Chief of Staff said that it is a standard procedure that every contributing country including Liberia funds the deployment and upkeep of its soldiers including the provision of major logistical support and services and gets reimbursed.“We are not alone. Based on the new regulations of the UN, some changes have been done. Other countries are also negotiating their MOU. The UN has two agreements – the ‘dry lease’ and ‘wet lease.’ Liberia’s deployment is under a ‘wet lease’ agreement where we go independent and take care of our troops and then the UN reimburses us,” Johnson explained.He added that when the MOU is completed, it will state how Liberia will be reimbursed for major equipment, maintenance, troop deployment and welfare.Meanwhile, Johnson disclosed that more AFL personnel are eager to serve peacekeeping missions in accordance with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s quest “to give back”; but cannot do so now due to the terms of the negotiated MOU.“The motivation is high; the soldiers are eager; we are hopeful that after the signing of the MOU, we will be requesting an increment to a full company size of 150 peacekeepers. The military is about service, and the soldiers are ready to serve. It is just that our MOU gives us a set number,” he noted.Meanwhile, Liberia’s permanent representative to the UN, Amb. Lewis G. Brown, met with Brig/Gen. Johnson during a visit to Liberia’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations on Tuesday, July 11, 2017. On behalf of his colleagues, Johnson thanked Amb. Brown and staff for all the support during the MOU negotiation process.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgThe U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has extended the temporary suspension of premium processing of H-1B visas. It will also expand this temporary suspension to include certain additional H-1B petitions, the agency said.  The recent suspension period can last until Feb.19, 2019. This extension of suspension is meant to process long-pending petitions, filed for expedition of the H-1B visa process, the USCIS said on Aug.28. The temporary suspension can reduce overall H-1B processing time, it said.  The agency had announced in March that it will suspend premium processing for cap-subjected H-1B visa petitions till Sept.10, 2018. It has now extended this period of suspension up to Feb.19, 2019. The premium processing of H-1B visa requires submission of fee worth $1,225, in addition to all other filing fees required by the application.“During this temporary suspension, we will reject any Form I-907, Request for Premium Processing Service, filed with an FY 2019 cap-subject H-1B petition. If a petitioner submits one combined check for the fees for Form I-907 and Form I-129 (Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker), we will reject both forms. When we resume premium processing, petitioners may file a Form I-907 for FY 2019 cap-subject H-1B petitions that remain pending,” the USCIS said on its website. However, during the suspension of premium processing service, one can request to expedite an FY 2019 cap-subject H-1B petition, provided the petition meets the Expedite Criteria given on the USCIS website.   Premium Processing Service provides expedited processing for certain employment-based petitions and applications. Specifically, USCIS guarantees 15 calendar day processing to those petitioners or applicants who choose to use this service or USCIS will refund the Premium Processing Service fee. Guarantee of 15-calendar day processing means that USCIS will issue an approval notice, a denial notice, a notice of intent to deny, a request for evidence, or it will open an investigation for fraud or misrepresentation within the 15-day period to those who opt for this service. The H-1B visa is the most common visa for highly-skilled Indian IT professionals to work at companies in the United States, and has been at the center of U.S. President Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration. The visa is valid for three years, and can be renewed for another three years.  There was a 42 percent increase in the denial of H-1B petitions for India-born professionals from the third to the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2017, which started July 1, 2017, the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP) said in its report in July. Related ItemsH-1B visaUSCISlast_img read more

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