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first_imgLudlow Watts, manager of Jamaica’s team to the IAAF World Championships in Athletics, defended the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association’s (JAAA) selection of Rasheed Dwyer to the team, while explaining the exclusion of quarter-miler Ricardo Chambers.Watts explained that Dwyer, who finished fifth in the 200m final at the JAAA/Supreme Venture Limited National Senior Championships and out of the automatic qualifying spots for his pet event, was added as a member of the 4x100m pool as a replacement for Andrew Fisher, who effectively gave up his spot after defecting to Bahrain.Chambers, who had battled his way back from years of injuries and setbacks, crossed the line in third place in the men’s 400m final at the JAAA/Supreme Ventures National Senior Championships, which serves as the primary selection method for the World Championships.The athlete celebrated what seemed an automatic spot in the individual 400m, with the JAAA selection policy making provision for the top-three finishers with IAAF qualifying standards as representatives in individual events.However, Chambers was later disqualified for a lane violation, promoting Peter Matthews to the third and final automatic individual spot, with Edino Steele, Jonia McDonald and Dane Hyatt also promoted to the fourth – sixth positions.All three were, as a result, named as members of the 4x400m relay pool, with Chambers – who posted the third fastest time by a Jamaican this year (44.93) at the NACAC Championships recently – and a number of observers expressing surprise at his exclusion from the squad.Vacancy filled”In the case of (Rasheed) Dwyer, there was a clear vacancy because we had six places for the (4x100m) relay pool, but ended up with only five athletes because one person who had qualified in the top six at trials, (Andrew) Fisher, is looking to represent another country, so that left us with five athletes and a clear vacancy in the 4x100m,” Watts told Gleaner Athletics. “Based on the entry, you could not have gotten anyone else on the team unless it was someone for the relay pool.”He added: “In the case of (Ricardo) Chambers, there was no scope for him to get in because they already selected six athletes for the 4x400m pool, so he could only have been named to the squad if someone withdrew,” Watts explained.The JAAA selection policy states:”Athletes placing in the first four positions in the 100m and 400m will be named to the relay pool. The remaining members of the relay pool will be selected by the JAAA Selection Committee.”As mandated by the IAAF, athletes who are selected to run individual 100m/400m are automatic members of the relay pool.”Dwyer, who is coached by technical leader Maurice Wilson, also has wildcard considerations, having won the 200m at the just-concluded Area championships, the NACAC Open Champs in San JosÈ, Costa Rica.last_img read more

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first_img 11 11 11 11 11 6. Baba Rahman (left back) 24. Gary Cahill (centre back) 2. Branislav Ivanovic (centre back) – click the arrow above, right, to see the predicted Chelsea line up v Norwich 10. Eden Hazard (wide forward) 22. Willian (wide forward) 11 Following the win at Southampton, Chelsea visit Norwich looking to make it three wins on the bounce.The Blues are up to eleventh in the Premier League, but have to play relegation battlers Norwich without the injured Pedro, Radamel Falcao and Kurt Zouma. John Terry is reportedly on the verge of returning to the first team, but the captain may not be risked with Stoke visiting Stamford Bridge on Saturday before the Champions League second leg against PSG.Click the arrow above, right, to see the predicted Chelsea line up v Norwich and let us know if what changes you would make. 11 11 8. Oscar (central attacker) 11 13. Thibaut Courtois (goalkeeper) 11 4. Cesc Fabregas (central midfield) 19. Diego Costa (striker) 12. John Mikel Obi (central midfield) 11 28. Cesar Azpilicueta (right back)last_img read more

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first_imgMay 10 2018Over 65s say they would find technology to help them take their medications helpful, but need the technology to be familiar, accessible and easy to use, according to research by Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge. People who do not use smartphones said that they’d prefer to have smartwatches than smartphones for reminders to take their pills.Around one tenth of cardiovascular events are associated with poor medication adherence, but some patients could be helped through new technologies to aid them with tablet taking and monitor adherence.Some technologies include apps that allow patients to receive counseling about medications and reminders to improve and monitor tablet taking. There are also interactive text message reminders for tablet taking. And Ingestible sensor systems (ISSs) are a combination of wearable and ingestible sensors working in conjunction with smartphones, PCs and tablets to detect ingested medication.However, not much is known on whether over 65s might find it difficult to adopt these technologies, due to ethnic diversity, and age-related physical and mental impairments.The study, published in the Journal of International Medical Research, investigated opinions about available technologies in a focus group of patients aged over 65 taking cardiovascular medications.The over 65s in the study generally valued the opportunity to receive alerts to help with practical aspects of medicine taking, like forgetting and monitoring treatment: “I think it’s good because there’s some people who as time goes by lose certain of their faculties as time goes by, and memory beginning to fade and so on, so on, it could have been a short retention in memory can cause you to miss a [medicine]” “. . .you always need to remember these things, they do slip your mind, even if there’s days of the week printed on your tablets sometimes you think, “did I take it this morning?” “I mean it’s a similar thing with now that hospitals, they text you to remind you about your hospital appointment now.” People familiar with smartphones welcomed an intervention through smartphones. Some participants were not familiar with smartphones, but all used wristwatches and preferred interventions using this technology, such as smartwatches: “. . .watches, if we all had watches. . .If it’s simpler to use elderly would appreciate more, it’s something that they have on their hand, on their arm. . . It’s a continuation of what we’re familiar with instead of something that we’re not familiar.” “Everybody’s been used to wearing at some time or another is a watch. . .So I think that most of us would find this much better.” “The watch is good but the mobile phone, half the time old people don’t know where they’ve put the phone, it’s the same with glasses, they don’t know where they’ve put them so it wouldn’t be of no benefit, but that watch would.” “. . .a smartphone, well, I did have but I put it in the washing machine, I dropped it.” Related StoriesMarijuana isn’t a great choice for glaucoma treatment, says expertGut-boosting food may put an end to childhood malnutrition worldwideDon’t ignore diastolic blood pressure values, say researchersOther concerns included potential reduction in face-to-face communication, data security, becoming dependent on technology and worrying about the consequences of technological failures: “If they’re not going to remember to take their tablets they ain’t going to remember to charge their mobiles.” “If it’s got to be a smart phone rather than an ordinary phone the cost of providing these for all the elderly is going to be astronomical.” “Well I see [technology might cause] lack of communication between professionals and the very elderly. . .., I’m afraid that this is about cost-cutting.” “I remember there was, the National Health Service right, had invested billions into this high tech computer that was going to be doing all singing all dancing, and guess what, it never did work, so all the investment that they put into this main frame that would then take all the information, it had gone done, it had a bug, it had glitches and it never performed as fit for purpose, so I’m one of these guys who’s lost confidence in technology.” “Technology is useful but you can’t depend on it, you never can depend on it.”center_img Lead researcher Dr Anna De Simoni from Queen Mary University of London said: “These findings have highlighted that people over 65 on cardiovascular medications are willing to consider technology to help with practical aspects of their day-to-day medicine taking, such as getting reminder alerts and monitoring doses taken, either themselves or by carers and clinicians.”In clinical consultations about medicine taking, healthcare professionals can explore technologies familiar and easily accessible to patients as a way to ensure good adherence. To this end additionally checking on common concerns, like worries about data security, becoming dependent on technology and consequences of technological failures can be beneficial.” Source:https://www.qmul.ac.uk/last_img read more

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